Jaclyn Cravens

Jaclyn Cravens
Texas Tech University | TTU · Department of Community, Family, and Addiction Services

PhD in Marriage and Family Therapy

About

15
Publications
13,741
Reads
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393
Citations
Introduction
Jaclyn D. Cravens, Ph.D. is an assistant professor in the Community, Family and Addiction Services department at Texas Tech University. Her research focuses on the role the Internet and social networking sites play in intimate couple relationships. Currently, Dr. Cravens is working to enhance the field of Couple and Family Technology.
Additional affiliations
August 2013 - August 2014
Alliant International University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Technology devices are widely used today, creating opportunities to connect and communicate with distant others while also potentially disrupting communication and interactions between those who are physically present (i.e., technoference or phubbing). These disruptions in couple and coparenting relationships have the potential to negatively impact...
Article
Full-text available
Social media provides one route to behaviors that may be potentially harmful to romantic relationships, such as communicating with alternative partners, which can sometimes create relationship conflict, breakups, or divorce. Limited empirical evidence exists concerning social media infidelity-related behaviors and marital relationships. This study...
Conference Paper
The majority of U.S. adults now own and use cell phones, computers, tablets, and more. This abundance of technology likely results in brief interruptions in family interactions, which has been termed “technoference” (technology interference). Researchers who examine technoference in couple relationships have found that those who report greater tech...
Article
Full-text available
Although principles of nonviolence have been applied in sociopolitical arenas, they can also be helpful in understanding intimate partner relationships. This is because couples who handle conflict in a constructive way are often using techniques and ideas congruent with nonviolent philosophies. Relationships that handle conflict by becoming aggress...
Article
Full-text available
Discussions about diversity rarely focus on overweight, obesity, and bias about body size (i.e., weight bias). These discussions allow students to develop self-awareness about how their biases can affect their clinical work, as well as the challenges and subsequent bias clients may face in their everyday lives and from clinical providers. One conse...
Article
Full-text available
A common response to intimate partner violence is to ask victims why they stay in the abusive relationship. Unfortunately this can have the effect of blaming or holding the victim responsible for the abuser’s actions. Recently, social media brought attention to this issue following the highly publicized case of intimate partner violence (IPV) with...
Article
Full-text available
When couples fight, they tend to distort, using strategies like denial, rationalization, and deception. These are used to blame the other and minimize one’s role in the conflict. This dynamic almost always exists during conflict and is found in extreme forms when fighting turns abusive. This project involved using constructivist grounded theory met...
Article
Full-text available
This mixed-methods study used content analysis and logistic regression to explore how people interpret Facebook infidelity behaviors, its impact on offline relationships, and how Facebook infidelity compares to online and offline infidelity. Six hundred twenty-eight respondents participated in a story completion task where they finished a narrative...
Article
Discrimination based on an individual's weight has been observed in health care, education, retail, and other public sectors (Puhl & Huer, Obesity, 17, 941, 2007). Such inequity, known as "weight bias," generates negative short-term and long-term consequences for the individuals that experience it (Puhl & Brownell, Weight bias in health care settin...
Article
Full-text available
The Internet can enhance existing relationships or facilitate the development of new relationships, including illicit ones. Increased research in this area has predominately been on online sexual addiction and pornography, with few about social networking sites. Facebook, a popular social networking site boasting 1.15 billion active users. This art...
Article
Full-text available
The pervasive nature of technology has forced couples and families to rethink the role technology plays in their lives. Several notable areas emerging as challenging areas in couples’ lives include Internet infidelity, Internet pornography usage, and cybersex addiction. The increased prevalence of technology-related issues in therapy has challenged...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research has focused on the Internet and relationships; however, little attention has been given to the specific role of social networking sites in relationship betrayal. Exploring the processes related to discovery of Facebook infidelity behaviors adds another layer to understanding Internet infidelity and highlights the behaviors unique to...
Article
This pilot study examined the relationship between youth and care provider self-reports of depressive symptoms assessed through the Patient Health Questionnaire and reports of youth physical and psychosocial functioning assessed by PedsQL4.0 in a rural outpatient overweight pediatric population (N = 66 child and care provider pairs). The relationsh...