Jackie Dawson

Jackie Dawson
University of Ottawa · Department of Geography

PhD

About

133
Publications
54,960
Reads
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3,581
Citations
Citations since 2016
81 Research Items
2859 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
Additional affiliations
August 2011 - present
University of Ottawa
Position
  • Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in Environment, Society, and Policy
Description
  • I run a research group called the 'Environment, Society, and Policy Group' www.espg.ca and teach courses in Geography and Environmental Studies.
August 2011 - present
University of Ottawa
Position
  • Associate Director of Arctic Development
Education
September 2005 - April 2009
University of Waterloo
Field of study
  • Geography
February 2002 - February 2003
University of Otago
Field of study

Publications

Publications (133)
Article
Full-text available
The growth in polar travel has been matched in recent decades by an intensification of scholarly activity related to many aspects of polar tourism. This paper systematically reviews 262 journal articles published on polar tourism (1980–2016) and identifies key research phases and themes. The development of the polar tourism scholarly network is doc...
Article
Year-round shipping is becoming common in the Canadian Arctic, a region rich in increasingly accessible natural resources. Currently, an average of two round-trip winter voyages (four single transits) (January, February, March) are made annually through the Hudson Strait to service the Raglan nickel mine in Deception Bay, Quebec. During these winte...
Article
Full-text available
Collisions between vehicles and wildlife is a global conservation concern, and vessel strikes are a leading cause of serious injury and mortality for baleen whales. Yet vessel strikes have rarely been studied in the Arctic. Vessel traffic is increasing throughout the Arctic as sea ice is declining, leading to increased overlap between vessels and w...
Article
Full-text available
Arctic marine mammals face a multitude of challenges linked to climate change, including increasing anthropogenic noise from ship traffic. The beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas), a predominately Arctic endemic cetacean, relies heavily on acoustic communication, with documented overlap between their vocalizations and hearing range and ship noise....
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is impacting sea ice extent and thickness in the Canadian Arctic, creating an increase in maritime accessibility that may accentuate risks related to ship operations due to a related increase in sea ice mobility. The overall risk to ships operating in regions with mobile sea ice will vary significantly depending on the ice class (i.e...
Article
Full-text available
The Arctic is changing rapidly due to climate change, which is allowing unprecedented levels of vessel traffic to transit the region. Vessel traffic can negatively affect marine wildlife in a number of ways, particularly in areas where vessels overlap with high concentrations of ecologically important species, and the significance of these impacts...
Article
Full-text available
Discussions of Arctic sovereignty and security have traditionally centered on the interests of the state and how it impacts the nation. More recently, scholars have noted the importance of addressing the interests of other actors, in particular, Indigenous peoples. Indigenous peoples in the Arctic have long advocated for conceptualizing Arctic sove...
Article
There is limited data on marine tourism traffic (cruise ships and pleasure craft) and on-shore locations visited by cruise ships in the Canadian Arctic. Marine tourism vessels represent 11.8% of all vessel voyages transiting within the Canadian Arctic, which is significant as these vessels "go off the beaten path" seeking out natural and cultural e...
Article
Full-text available
As Inuit hunters living in Pond Inlet, Nunavut, we (Natasha Simonee and Jayko Alooloo) travel extensively on land, water, and sea ice. Climate change, including changing sea ice and increasingly unpredictable weather patterns, has made it riskier and harder for us to travel and hunt safely. Inuit knowledge supporting safe travel is also changing an...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change-driven reductions in sea ice have facilitated increased shipping traffic volumes across the Arctic. Here, we use climate model simulations to investigate changing navigability in the Canadian Arctic for major trade routes and coastal community resupply under 1, 2 and 4 °C of global warming above pre-industrial levels, on the basis of...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Tourist vessels present unique risks in terms of travel through the Canadian Arctic. The purpose of this type of travel is not simply to transit through, or to find the safest and fastest route, the purpose is adventure and exploration. This means that tourist vessels often travel to areas of the Canadian Arctic that are not necessarily well servic...
Article
There have been rapid recent reductions in sea ice age and extent in the Canadian Arctic, but little previous analysis of how this has impacted the navigability of Arctic shipping. In this study we analyze how navigability changed over the period 1972–2016 by converting Canadian Ice Service ice charts to shipping navigability charts for different h...
Article
Full-text available
Tallurutiup Imanga (TI) is a National Marine Conservation Area (NMCA) established in 2019 at the eastern entrance of the Northwest Passage in Lancaster Sound, Nunavut, Canada, to protect 110,000 square kilometres of core habitat for cetaceans. This study examines the potential impacts of underwater noise from increased ship traffic in TI NMCA on th...
Article
Full-text available
The Arctic has been a refuge from anthropogenic underwater noise; however, climate change has caused summer sea ice to diminish, allowing for unprecedented access and the potential for increased underwater noise. Baseline underwater sound levels must be quantified to monitor future changes and manage underwater noise in the Arctic. We analyzed 39 p...
Article
Full-text available
For over 50 years, Churchill, Manitoba has provided visitors an opportunity to see polar bears in their natural environment. Over the same time period, an increase in temperatures and related reductions in sea ice has negatively impacted the health of polar bears in the Western Hudson Bay. In 2008, the term ‘last chance tourism’ was coined, linking...
Data
This is the conference presentation given by William Halliday at the Acoustical Society of America meeting.
Article
Full-text available
Documenting Inuit and local knowledge is critical to its consideration within policy discussions around Arctic shipping; especially considering the rapid increase in ship traffic due to reductions in sea ice and climate change. We present our unique community-based research approach which incorporated youth training, participatory mapping, qualitat...
Article
In 2018, The International Maritime Organization, officially proposed consideration of a ban on heavy fuel oil (HFO) use by ships in the Arctic, because of the widely accepted understanding that HFO presents a threat to the marine environment. There is currently a lack of understanding of the scale and scope of HFO use by ships operating in Canadia...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Ship traffic in the Canadian Arctic nearly tripled between 1990 and 2015.1 The Government of Canada is developing a network of low-impact marine transportation corridors in the Arctic that encourages marine transportation traffic to use routes that pose less risk and minimize the impact on communities and the environment. The Low Impact Shipping Co...
Article
Full-text available
Ship traffic has nearly tripled in the Canadian Arctic over the past decade and additional growth is expected as climate change continues to increase navigability in the region. In response, the Canadian Government is developing Low Impact Shipping Corridors as an adaptation strategy that supports safety and sustainability under rapidly changing en...
Article
Environmental conditions in Polar Regions are becoming more dynamic due to climate change. As sea ice melts, the range of human activities in Polar Regions are projected to increase, while weather conditions are becoming more extreme and unpredictable. Provision and use of weather, water, ice and climate (WWIC) information plays a key role in ensur...
Article
The Polar Regions are undergoing rapid environmental change while simultaneously witnessing growth and diversification of human activity. These changes call for more responsive, detailed and specialized weather, water, ice and climate (WWIC) information services so that the risks related to human activities can be minimized. Drawn from an extensive...
Article
Full-text available
Facilitating research and enhancing community research capacity through a partnered approach in Inuit Nunangat (the Inuit homeland of Canada, located in Arctic Canada) presents learning opportunities and challenges for southern-based, non-Inuit researchers and community members alike. This article outlines lessons learned through the Arctic Corrido...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This discussion paper contains background information, including a definition of Low-Impact Shipping Corridors, an overview of Arctic shipping trends, potential Corridors models, Nunavut community members’ perspectives about the Corridors, and an introduction to the proposed Canadian Arctic Shipping and Transportation Network (CASTnet). It also out...
Chapter
In recent decades, melting of sea ice in the Arctic region has played an important role in the emergence of a cruise tourism industry in that region. Although the increase in Arctic cruise tourism has certainly been influenced by various forces of change such as global trends, commodity prices, demographics, and globalization, the ef-fects of clima...
Article
National parks in Canada operate under the dual mandate of conservation and visitor use, which involves balancing ecological integrity and nature-based tourism activities. Climate-induced environmental change may increase the existing tension between conservation and visitor use as major tourism resources located in protected areas are projected to...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Ship traffic in the Canadian Arctic nearly tripled between 1990 and 2015.Most of that increase happened in Nunavut waters. The average annual kilometres travelled within 50 km of Resolute Bay has decreased by 1,819 km when comparing the 1990-2000 and 2011-2015 averages; a decrease largely due to the 2002 closure of the Polaris zinc mine on nearby L...
Article
Full-text available
Communities across the global Arctic are experiencing growth in transiting, destination and domestic ship traffic. Environmental impacts resulting from Arctic shipping have been well documented, but little is known about how these impacts affect livelihoods in the local communities that are reliant on their natural landscapes. Given the heterogenei...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Polar Prediction Project (PPP) was conceived and initiated in 2012 by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), through its World Weather Research Programme (WWRP), in response to rapid environmental change in the Polar Regions. The primary goal of the PPP is to advance scientific knowledge such that society, both within and outside of the A...
Article
Full-text available
Arctic climate change has the potential to affect access to semi-permanent trails on land, water and sea ice, which are the main forms of transport for communities in many circumpolar regions. Focusing on Inuit Nunangat (the Inuit homeland in northern Canada), trail access models were developed drawing upon a participatory process that connects Ind...
Article
With reference to virtue ethics and ethics of care, this paper discusses ethical challenges of tourism consumption and the last chance tourism marketplace. Survey results and a visitor segmentation of travellers to two climate threatened destinations show that most visitors are not willing to engage in carbon offsetting, and that willingness is rel...
Article
Transiting the Northwest Passage captured the imaginations of explorers and adventures for centuries. The idea of a shorter and more economical trade route through the frozen North resulted in hundreds of state and privately financed expeditions to the Canadian Arctic. Perhaps the most famous of the expeditions was the British-led Franklin voyage i...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Ship traffic in the Canadian Arctic nearly tripled between 1990 and 2015. Most of that increase happened in Nunavut waters. The average annual kilometres travelled within 50 km of Coral Harbour from 2011-2015 was the third lowest in Nunavut. However, when comparing the 1990-2000 and 2011-2015 averages, vessel traffic within 50 kilometres of Coral H...
Chapter
The Arctic is being influenced dramatically by climate change and new environmental conditions. As a result, there are increasing opportunities for local economic development and one of the sectors that is responding rapidly is marine tourism. In particular, Arctic cruise and yacht tourism has increased across all Arctic regions as sea ice declines...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Ship traffic in the Canadian Arctic nearly tripled between 1990 and 2015.1 The Government of Canada is developing a network of low-impact marine transportation corridors in the Arctic that encourages marine transportation traffic to use routes that pose less risk and minimize the impact on communities and the environment. The Low Impact Shipping Co...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Ship traffic in the Canadian Arctic nearly tripled between 1990 and 2015. The Government of Canada is developing a network of low-impact marine transportation corridors in the Arctic that encourages marine transportation traffic to use routes that pose less risk and minimize the impact on communities and the environment. The Low Impact Shipping Cor...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Ship traffic in the Canadian Arctic nearly tripled between 1990 and 2015. The Government of Canada is developing a network of low-impact marine transportation corridors in the Arctic that encourages marine transportation traffic to use routes that pose less risk and minimize the impact on communities and the environment. The Low Impact Shipping Cor...
Article
Full-text available
Pleasure craft are one of the fastest growing sectors of maritime transportation across the global Arctic and increasingly also in the Antarctic. The increase in interest among pleasure craft operators in traveling to polar regions presents a number of local economic development opportunities. However, current governance systems do not yet fully ad...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Ship traffic in the Canadian Arctic nearly tripled between 1990 and 2015. Corridors have been mapped in the Arctic Ocean as part of the Low Impact Shipping Corridors Initiative co-led by Transport Canada, the Canadian Coast Guard, and Canadian Hydrographic Service. Low impact shipping corridors are the current framework for governing shipping in th...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Ship traffic in the Canadian Arctic nearly tripled between 1990 and 2015. The Government of Canada is developing a network of low-impact marine transportation corridors in the Arctic that encourages marine transportation traffic to use routes that pose less risk and minimize the impact on communities and the environment. The Low Impact Shipping Cor...
Article
Vessel traffic has been increasing rapidly in the Arctic, and within the Canadian Arctic, tourist vessels are the fastest growing maritime sector. Vessel traffic can cause a variety of impacts on whales, including ship strikes and acoustic disturbance. Here, the overlap between tourist vessels (e.g., pleasure craft/yachts and passenger vessels/crui...
Presentation
Full-text available
Conducting research in and with remote communities in Arctic Canada presents opportunities and challenges. We used a community-based approach to document culturally significant marine areas, impacts of marine vessel traffic, and management options for low impact shipping corridors. Seeking practical solutions to real problems, we explored the impli...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report documents some Aklavik community members’ knowledge and extensive year-round use of important marine areas (ecological, socio-cultural, archaeological, and travel routes), the potential impacts of shipping on those areas and on community members, and recommendations for management of the Low Impact Shipping Corridors.
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report documents Cambridge Bay, Nunavut community members’ knowledge and extensive year-round use of important marine areas (ecological, socio-cultural, archaeological, and travel routes), the potential impacts of shipping on those areas and on community members, and recommendations for management of the Low Impact Shipping Corridors.
Presentation
Arctic Corridors and Northern Voices Research documents Canadian Arctic community members’ knowledge and extensive year-round use of important marine areas (ecological, socio-cultural, archaeological, and travel routes); the potential impacts of shipping on those areas and on community members; and recommendations for management of the Low Impact S...
Article
Full-text available
The limited availability of consistent, longitudinal data sources for marine traffic in Arctic Canada has presented significant challenges for researchers, policy makers, and planners. Temporally and spatially accurate shipping data that reveal historical and current traffic trends are vital to plan safe shipping corridors, develop infrastructure,...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report documents Pond Inlet community members’ knowledge and extensive year-round use of important marine areas (ecological, socio-cultural, archaeological, and travel routes), the potential impacts of shipping on those areas and on community members, and recommendations for management of the Low Impact Shipping Corridors.
Technical Report
Full-text available
Ship traffic in the Canadian Arctic nearly tripled between 1990 and 2015. During this time, there has been an increase in ship traffic in the Hudson Strait region.The community of Salluit experiences shipping near the community due to vessels delivering goods, as in many other northern towns, but has additional experience with shipping due to local...
Article
Rapid environmental change in vulnerable destinations has stimulated a new form of travel termed “last chance tourism” (LCT). Studies have examined the risks of LCT, while leaving potential opportunities within this new tourism market largely underexplored. Results of survey (n = 399) research in Jasper National Park, Canada reveal that a LCT motiv...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report documents Gjoa Haven, Nunavut community members’ knowledge and extensive year-round use of important marine areas (ecological, socio-cultural, archaeological, and travel routes), the potential impacts of shipping on those areas and on community members, and recommendations for management of the Low Impact Shipping Corridors.
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report documents Arviat, Nunavut community members’ knowledge and extensive year-round use of important marine areas (ecological, socio-cultural, archaeological, and travel routes), the potential impacts of shipping on those areas and on community members, and recommendations for management of the Low Impact Shipping Corridors.
Article
Marine tourism in Arctic Canada has grown substantially since 2005. Though there are social, economic and cultural opportunities associated with industry growth, climate change and a range of environmental risks and other problems present significant management challenges. This paper describes the growth in cruise tourism and pleasure craft travel...
Article
This paper investigates how Arctic expedition cruise operators ‘create’ tourism destinations and diversify tourism space through itinerary making. The study proposes a typology of perceived values of a tourism destination and explores what value dimensions are critical in deciding on cruising locations. The typology helps to explain why certain loc...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: Airbnb is a web-based peer-to-peer (P2P) service that enables potential hosts and guests to broker accommodations in private homes as an alternative to traditional hotels. The hospitality sector has increasingly gone smoke-free over the last decade. This study identified the availability and cost of smoking-permitted accommodations identi...
Conference Paper
Increased navigability of Arctic waters, as a result of climate change, is intersecting with a global appetite for untapped natural resources, increasing Arctic tourism, and growing traffic through the Northwest Passage. This situation is testing Nunavut’s safety and security, and is challenging communities. Corridors have been mapped in the Arctic...
Conference Paper
Ikaarvik: Barriers to Bridges is dedicated to creating stronger connections between Arctic communities and science. Ikaarvik has developed a community-directed research methodology that addresses local research priorities in the North by empowering youth to be the bridge between their communities and Arctic science. This approach begins with youth...
Article
Full-text available
Ridges in sea ice and the convergent forces that form them are a serious hazard to ships traveling in the Arctic, but few studies have examined ridge distribution at a basin level in the Canadian Arctic. The Hudson Strait, which connects Hudson Bay and the North Atlantic, is a site of ongoing winter shipping where vessels frequently encounter press...
Article
Full-text available
Significant attention has focused on the potential for increased shipping activity driven by recent observed declines in Arctic sea ice cover. In this study, we describe the first coupled spatial analysis between shipping activity and sea ice using observations in the Canadian Arctic over the 1990-2015 period. Shipping activity is measured using kn...
Presentation
Full-text available
Community-based research study was implemented with the participation of multi-disciplinary researchers. It explored local (Inuit and non-Inuit) knowledge about socio-cultural and ecological marine zones, their importance and sensitivity, barriers to community members’ continued use of them, and resulting impacts on community members’ well-being. M...
Article
Changing environmental conditions in the Canadian Arctic are associated with an increase in marine tourism. A substantial decline in the extent of ice coverage in the summer season has resulted in greater accessibility for all categories of ships, and the tourism sector has been quick to respond to new opportunities. This increase in vessel traffic...
Poster
Full-text available
Climate change and subsequent loss of sea ice cover has increased the navigability of Arctic waters and influenced an increase in shipping activity (Dawson et al. 2014, Pizzolato et al. 2014). The Northern Marine Transportation Corridors Initiative, co-led by the Canadian Coast Guard, provides a framework for ship traffic and decision-making and ai...