Jack F. Murphy

Jack F. Murphy
Trinity College Dublin | TCD

About

4
Publications
374
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
112
Citations
Introduction
Currently, senior sophister at Trinity College Dublin studying biomedical engineering. Specifically interested in the fields of tissue engineering and cardiac regeneration.
Additional affiliations
September 2018 - present
Trinity College Dublin
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • • Used polarized light microscopy to image and analyze regions of interest around a silicone device. • Helped to implement a testing apparatus to determine if a scaffold propagates an electric pulse between tissue samples.
June 2017 - December 2017
Columbia University
Position
  • Lab Intern
Description
  • Exfoliated graphite to get monolayer graphene. Worked on creating a device with this graphene insulated by a layer of boron nitrite on either side to study superconductivity.
March 2017 - present
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Used 3-D human Engineered Cardiac Tissues fabricated from human induced pluripotent stem cells to evaluate the mechanisms by which cardiac progenitor cells and mesenchymal stem cells enhance cardiac function
Education
September 2018 - May 2022
Trinity College Dublin
Field of study
  • Biomedical Engineering

Publications

Publications (4)
Article
Background and Objective: The field of cardiac tissue engineering has provided valuable three-dimensional species-specific models of the human myocardium in the form of human Engineered Cardiac Tissues (hECTs) and similar constructs. However, hECT systems are bottlenecked by software that can only collect data from one tissue at a time, even in mul...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Delivery of stem cells to the failing heart is a promising therapeutic strategy. However, the improvement in cardiac function in animal studies has not fully translated to humans. To help bridge the gap between species, we investigated the effects of adult human cardiac stem cells (hCSCs) on contractile function of human engineered car...
Chapter
The lack of biomimetic in vitro models of the human heart has posed a critical barrier to progress in the field of modeling cardiac disease. Human engineered cardiac tissues (hECTs)—autonomous, beating structures that recapitulate key aspects of native cardiac muscle physiology—offer an attractive alternative to traditional in vitro models. Here we...
Article
Rationale: The promising clinical benefits of delivering human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) for treating heart disease warrant a better understanding of underlying mechanisms of action. hMSC exosomes increase myocardial contractility; however, the exosomal cargo responsible for these effects remains unresolved. Objective: This study aims to id...

Network

Cited By