Jack Glaser

Jack Glaser
University of California, Berkeley | UCB · Richard and Rhoda Goldman School of Public Policy

PhD

About

47
Publications
23,593
Reads
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5,995
Citations
Citations since 2017
2 Research Items
2912 Citations
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Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (47)
Article
During a 29-year period studied by a government task force, 10 off-duty police officers were found to have been mistaken for civilians and fatally shot by another police officer. Eight of these officers were Black, one was Hispanic, and one was White. Given that at least 75% of U.S. police officers in this period were White, we estimate that there...
Article
In a time when racial prejudice is generally taboo and decision makers, including law enforcement officials, strenuously disavow the use of group-based stereotypes to make judgments that affect others, one might expect discriminatory outcomes to be unusual. However, research repeatedly indicates that discrimination is pervasive across many domains,...
Chapter
In this chapter, Kahn, Goff, and Glaser discuss how masculinity threat (perceived threat to manhood) and implicit racial bias (unconscious racial prejudice) may affect authority figures’ interactions with adolescents, which may lead to disproportionate discipline outcomes for non-White adolescents. The chapter details the theory and development of...
Article
Full-text available
This article draws on the behavioral science literature to offer empirically driven policy prescriptions that can reduce the effect of bias and ameliorate unequal treatment in policing, the criminal justice system, employment, and national security.
Research
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The following paper on drivers of racial disproportions is broken into two parts, representing distinct, but not mutually exclusive, causes: space and stereotypes. The first section, authored by Charles Crawford, describes theory and research to promote an understanding of the role that geographical space, particularly vis a vis racial/ethnic compo...
Article
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When anticipating the imposition of the death penalty, jurors may be less inclined to convict defendants. On the other hand, minority defendants have been shown to be treated more punitively, particularly in capital cases. Given that the influence of anticipated sentence severity on verdicts may vary as a function of defendant race, the goal of thi...
Article
Full-text available
When anticipating the imposition of the death penalty, jurors may be less inclined to convict defendants. On the other hand, minority defendants have been shown to be treated more punitively, particularly in capital cases. Given that the influence of anticipated sentence severity on verdicts may vary as a function of defendant race, the goal of thi...
Book
Full-text available
Until now, most discussion of racial profiling has given only fleeting consideration of its causes. Those causes are overwhelmingly psychological. In Suspect Race, social psychologist and public policy expert Jack Glaser leverages a century's worth of social psychological research to provide a clear understanding of how stereotypes, even those oper...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores psychological science on race bias and its implications in several domains of public policy, with special attention paid to biased policing as an illustrative example. Race bias arises from normal mental processes, many outside our conscious awareness and control. This research directly applies to public policy, especially whe...
Article
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A controlled experiment tested the possibility that racial profiling-disproportionate scrutiny of a minority racial group by sanctioned authorities-would have a "reverse deterrent" effect on the illicit behavior of members of a nonprofiled majority group. Research participants given a task involving extremely difficult anagrams were given the oppor...
Article
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The concept of automaticity, long central in cognitive psychology, has come to occupy an important place in social psychology as well. It appears that unconscious vigilance for bias can lead to corrective processes that also operate without conscious awareness or intent. This chapter argues that the unconscious, in addition to being a passive categ...
Article
American National Election Studies' (ANES) 2008 national survey data were used to explore the effects of pre-election emotional responses to candidates on presidential vote. Consistent with decades of election study findings, party identification was the most influential predictor of vote choice. Nevertheless, self-reported emotional responses to B...
Article
A controlled experiment tested the possibility that racial profiling – disproportionate scrutiny of minorities by sanctioned authorities – would have “reverse deterrent” effects on the illicit behavior of members of non-profiled groups (e.g., Whites). Research participants given a task involving extremely difficult anagrams were given the opportuni...
Article
Full-text available
In this article, we respond at length to recent critiques of research on implicit bias, especially studies using the Implicit Association Test (IAT). Tetlock and Mitchell (2009) claim that ''there is no evidence that the IAT reliably predicts class-wide discrimination on tangible outcomes in any setting,'' accuse their colleagues of violating ''the...
Article
Racial profiling-the use of race, ethnicity, or national origin by law enforcement officials to make judgments of criminal suspicion-is assessed in terms of its effect on targeted populations and on law enforcement efficiency. A mathematical simulation, comparing multiple profiling and non-profiling scenarios, is employed. This analysis indicates t...
Article
Full-text available
The role of Implicit Motivation to Control Prejudice (IMCP) in moderating the effect of resource depletion on spontaneous discriminatory behavior was examined. Cognitive resource depletion was manipulated by having participants solve either difficult or easy anagrams. A "Shooter Task" measuring unintended racial discriminatory behavior followed. Pa...
Article
Full-text available
This research draws on ideas about emotion-related appraisal tendencies to generate and test novel propositions about intergroup emotions. First, emotion elicited by outgroup category activation can be transferred to an unrelated stimulus (incidental emotion effects). Second, people predisposed toward an emotion are more prejudiced toward groups th...
Article
This research examines whether spontaneous, unintentional discriminatory behavior can be moderated by an implicit (nonconscious) motivation to control prejudice. We operationalize implicit motivation to control prejudice (IMCP) in terms of an implicit negative attitude toward prejudice (NAP) and an implicit belief that oneself is prejudiced (BOP)....
Article
Full-text available
Policy attitudes relating to group-based inequities are in many cases founded on tenuous legitimizing beliefs which are contradicted by empirical evidence. Policy issues, and their attendant legitimizing beliefs, are considered, including affirmative action, colorblindness/“racial privacy,” hate crime legislation, same-sex marriage, and, in greater...
Article
Full-text available
In an experiment, Republican and Democratic participants viewed a video clip of an ostensible congressional candidate labeled as Republican, Democratic, or not given a party label delivering the same speech in an emotionally expressive or unexpressive manner. When the candidate was labeled a Democrat, he was rated more positively by Democratic part...
Article
Analyzing political conservatism as motivated social cognition integrates theories of personality (authoritarianism, dogmatism-intolerance of ambiguity), epistemic and existential needs (for closure, regulatory focus, terror management), and ideological rationalization (social dominance, system justification). A meta-analysis (88 samples, 12 countr...
Article
A meta-analysis by J. T. Jost, J. Glaser, A. W. Kruglanski, and F. J. Sulloway (2003) concluded that political conservatism is partially motivated by the management of uncertainty and threat. In this reply to J. Greenberg and E. Jonas (2003), conceptual issues are clarified, numerous political anomalies are explained, and alleged counterexamples ar...
Article
Full-text available
We conducted semistructured interviews with 38 participants in White racist In-ternet chat rooms, examining the extent to which people would, in this unique environment, advocate interracial violence in response to purported economic and cultural threats. Capitalizing on the anonymity and candor of chat room interactions, this study provides an unu...
Article
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Responses to information were facilitated by the rapid prior presentation of evaluatively congruent material. This fundamental discovery (R. H. Fazio, D. M. Sanbonmatsu, M. C. Powell, & F. R. Kardes, 1986) marked a breakthrough in research on automatic information processing by demonstrating that evaluative meaning is grasped without conscious cont...
Article
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Trends in bigoted violence are often explained by reference to frustrations arising from macroeconomic downturns. Historical and recent time-series studies have turned up significant links between economic conditions and lynchings of Blacks in the pre-Depression South (e.g., Hepworth & West, 1988; Hovland & Sears, 1940). However, replicating the ti...
Article
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Recent U.S. history provides vivid illustrations of the importance of politicians' emotional displays in subsequent judgments of them. Yet, a review of empirical research on the role of affect (emotion, mood, and evaluation) in electoral politics reveals little work that has focused on the impact of candidates' emotional expression on voters' prefe...
Article
Prenatal alcohol exposure is associated with a variety of impairments in neonatal state regulatory systems. Since prenatal alcohol exposure causes thermoregulatory deficits in response to both heat and cold stress in rats, body temperature set-point might be altered in alcohol-exposed offspring. The effect of prenatal alcohol exposure on behavior i...
Article
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Well, I think that this might mark a bit of a change in gears. For one thing, I'm going to be focusing more on the behavior of the targets of evaluation — the candidates themselves, although really still in the service of understanding how their behavior affects voters' opinions of and behavior towards them, so we're still in that same ballpark. I...

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