Jack Armitage

Jack Armitage
Queen Mary, University of London | QMUL · School of Engineering and Materials Science

Media and Arts Technologies

About

13
Publications
4,383
Reads
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36
Citations
Citations since 2016
12 Research Items
36 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022024681012
2016201720182019202020212022024681012
2016201720182019202020212022024681012
2016201720182019202020212022024681012
Additional affiliations
August 2017 - present
Georgia Institute of Technology
Position
  • Visiting Scholar
September 2015 - September 2020
Queen Mary, University of London
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2012 - June 2013
University of Leeds
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
September 2009 - July 2012
University of Leeds
Field of study
  • Music, Multimedia and Electronics

Publications

Publications (13)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In digital musical instrument design, different tools and methods offer a variety of approaches for constraining the exploration of musical gestures and sounds. Toolkits made of modular components usefully constrain exploration towards simple, quick and functional combinations, and methods such as sketching and model-making alternatively allow imag...
Article
Full-text available
Extensive training with a musical instrument results in the automatisation of the bodily operations needed to manipulate the instrument: the performer no longer has to consciously think about the instrument while playing. The ability of the performer to automate operations on the instrument is due to sensorimotor mechanisms that can predict changes...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Liveness is an important factor in live coding but frequently liveness focuses on high-level, textual environments. While these environments offer manifold abstraction capabilities, users of low-level dataflow programming environments could also benefit from increased liveness. In this work we introduce LiveCore: a macro library for the low-level d...
Conference Paper
Interaction design research typically differentiates processes involving hardware and software tools as being led by tinkering and play, versus engineering and conceptualisation. Increasingly however, embedded maker tools and platforms require hybridisation of these processes. In the domain of digital musical instrument (DMI) design, we were motiva...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper explores the process by which designers come to terms with an unfamiliar and ambiguous sensor material. Drawing on craft practice and material-driven interaction design, we developed a simple yet flexible sensor technology based on the movement of conductive elements within a magnetic field. Variations in materials and structure give ris...
Conference Paper
Despite digital lutherie’s goal of enabling liveness in performance, digital lutherie as a process often lacks liveness. The tools of digital lutherie, adapted from domains where liveness was neither feasible or important, can make craft process feel dull, blind and isolated. Understanding and supporting live craft process in digital lutherie is im...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
At first glance, the practice of musical live coding seems dis-tanced from the gestures and sense of embodiment common in musical performance, electronic or otherwise. This workshop seeks to explore the extent to which this assertion is justified, to reexamine notions of gesture and embodiment in musical live coding performance, to consider histori...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper explores the question of how live coding musicians can perform with musicians who are not using code (such as acoustic instrumentalists or those using graphical and tangible electronic interfaces). This paper investigates performance systems that facilitate improvisation where the musicians can interact not just by listening to each othe...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Though laptop live coders are known to use other devices and instruments and play with other musicians, laptop live coding generally shares the common physical interface of the QWERTY keyboard. This project seeks to provide a means to explore alternatives to the QWERTY keyboard as a physical interface to laptop live coding. We present a live coding...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Implementing an understandable, accessible and e↵ective user interface is a major challenge for many products in the microcontroller and embedded computing community. Bela, an embedded system for ultra-low latency audio and sensor processing, features a browser-based integrated development environment (IDE) using web technologies (Node.js, HTML5 an...
Poster
Full-text available
Many digital musical instrument design frameworks have been proposed that are well suited for analysis and comparison. However, not all provide applicable design suggestions, especially where subtle, important details are concerned. Using traditional lutherie as a model, we conducted a series of interviews to explore how violin makers “go beyond th...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This half-day workshop will explore the craft of digital musical instrument design. Craft practice is central to the working process of both acoustic and digital instrument builders. Unlike the higher-level NIME design frameworks and tax-onomies that appear in the literature, craft knowledge is often personal, subjective, and occasionally difficult...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Sound is an integral medium of communication in society. Despite its influence in everyday interaction, the fundamental features of sound and its impact are not commonly understood and often not considered. Advanced dissection and analysis of sound is often used to aid technology's understanding of its environment (e.g. in robotics and telecommunic...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The goal of this project is to gather papers that use Bela or describe the platform.
Project
Musical performers spend many years achieving proficiency on their instruments. Newly-created digital musical instruments (DMIs) face a significant barrier to adoption in that few performers are willing to repeat these years of training to develop expertise on an unknown instrument. Without expert players, evaluating the success of a DMI design is challenging, and establishing its place in a broader musical community is nearly impossible. As a result, while many digital instruments have been created over the past decade, few have achieved lasting impact beyond the first few performances. This fellowship proposes a new approach to DMI design which repurposes the existing skills and experience of trained musicians, providing them with a rapid path to virtuosity without years of retraining.