Jacek Radwan

Jacek Radwan
Adam Mickiewicz University | UAM · Evolutionary Biology Lab

About

223
Publications
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Publications

Publications (223)
Article
Full-text available
The amount and nature of genetic variation available to natural selection affect the rate, course and outcome of evolution. Consequently, the study of the genetic basis of adaptive evolutionary change has occupied biologists for decades, but progress has been hampered by the lack of resolution and the absence of a genome-level perspective. Technolo...
Article
The genic capture hypothesis offers a resolution to the question of how genetic variation in male sexually selected traits is maintained in the face of strong female preferences. The hypothesis is that male display traits are costly to produce and hence depend upon overall condition, which itself is dependent upon genes at many loci. Few attempts h...
Article
The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is crucial to the adaptive immune response of vertebrates and is among the most polymorphic gene families known. Its high diversity is usually attributed to selection imposed by fast-evolving pathogens. Pathogens are thought to evolve to escape recognition by common immune alleles, and, hence, novel MHC al...
Article
Full-text available
Failure of organisms to adapt to sudden environmental changes may lead to extinction. The type of mating system, by affecting fertility and the strength of sexual selection, may have a major impact on a population's chances to adapt and survive. Here, we use experimental evolution in bulb mites (Rhizoglyphus robini) to examine the effects of the ma...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding pest evolution in agricultural systems is crucial for developing effective and innovative pest control strategies. Types of cultivation, such as crop monocultures versus polycultures or crop rotation, may act as a selective pressure on pests’ capability to exploit the host’s resources. In this study, we examined the herbivorous mite A...
Article
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Female preferences for male ornamental traits can arise from indirect benefits, such as increased attractiveness or better viability of progeny, but empirical evidence for such benefits is inconsistent. Artificial selection offers a powerful way to investigate indirect effects of male ornaments. Here, we selected for the area of orange spots on mal...
Article
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Natural host populations differ in their susceptibility to infection by parasites, and these intra‐population differences are still an incompletely understood component of host‐parasite dynamics. In this study, we used controlled infection experiments with wild‐caught guppies (Poecilia reticulata) and their ectoparasite Gyrodactylus turnbulli to in...
Article
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A Correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41437-021-00407-y
Article
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Hybridization is one of the major factors contributing to the emergence of highly successful parasites. Hybrid vigor can play an important role in this process, but subsequent rounds of recombination in the hybrid population may dilute its effects. Increased fitness of hybrids can, however, be frozen by asexual reproduction. Here, we identify invas...
Article
Selection pressure from parasites is thought to be a major force shaping the extreme polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, but the modes and consequences of selection remain unclear. Here, we analyse MHC class II and microsatellite diversity in 16 guppy (Poecilia reticulata) populations from two islands (Trinidad and Tob...
Article
Gyrodactylids are ubiquitous ectoparasites of teleost fish, but our understanding of the host immune response against them is fragmentary. Here, we used RNA‐Seq to investigate genes involved in the primary response to infection with Gyrodactylus bullatarudis on the skin of guppies, Poecilia reticulata, an important evolutionary model, but also one...
Article
Sexual selection and conflict can act on genes with important metabolic functions, potentially shaping standing genetic variance in such genes, and thus evolutionary potential of populations. Here, using experimental evolution, we show how reproductive competition intensity and thermal environment affect selection on phosphogluconate dehydrogenase...
Article
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Elaborate sexually selected ornaments and armaments are costly but increase the reproductive success of their bearers (usually males). It has been postulated that high‐quality males can invest disproportionately more in such traits, making those traits honest signals of genetic quality. However, genes associated with such traits may have sexually a...
Preprint
Full-text available
Hybridization is one of the major factors contributing to the emergence of highly successful parasites. Hybrid vigor can play an important role in this process, but its contribution to the evolutionary success of parasites has not been demonstrated. Here, we identify an invasion of a 'frozen hybrid' genotype in natural populations of Gyrodactylus t...
Article
Determining the molecular basis of parasite adaptation to its host is an important component in understanding host‐parasite coevolution and the epidemiology of parasitic infections. Here, we investigate short‐ and long‐term adaptive evolution in the eukaryotic parasite, Gyrodactylus bullatarudis, infecting Caribbean guppies (Poecilia reticulata), b...
Article
Full-text available
MHC-based mating rules can evolve as a way to avoid inbreeding or to increase offspring immune competence. While the role of mating preference in the MHC diversity in vertebrates has been acknowledged, its impact on individual MHC diversity has not been considered. Here, we use computer simulations to investigate how simple mating rules favouring M...
Article
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Proteins encoded by the classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes incite the vertebrate adaptive immune response by presenting peptide antigens on the cell surface. Here, we review mechanisms explaining landmark features of these genes: extreme polymorphism, excess of nonsynonymous changes in peptide-binding domains, and long gene gene...
Article
The seemingly transparent wings of many insects have recently been found to display unexpected structural coloration. These structural colours (wing interference patterns: WIPs) may be involved in species recognition and mate choice, yet little is known about the evolutionary processes that shape them. Furthermore, to date investigations of WIPs ha...
Article
Full-text available
MHC genes, which code for proteins responsible for presenting pathogen-derived antigens to the host immune system, show remarkable copy-number variation both between and within species. However, the evolutionary forces driving this variation are poorly understood. Here, we use computer simulations to investigate whether evolution of the number of M...
Article
Full-text available
Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes encode proteins that initiate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of foreign antigens to T cells. The high polymorphism found at these genes, thought to be promoted and maintained by pathogen-mediated selection, contrasts with the limited number of MHC loci found in most vertebrates. Altho...
Article
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Males and females share most of their genome and develop many of the same traits. However, each sex frequently has different optimal values for these shared traits, creating intralocus sexual conflict. This conflict has been observed in wild and laboratory populations of insects and affects important evolutionary processes such as sexual selection,...
Preprint
Full-text available
The seemingly transparent wings of many insects have recently been found to display dramatic structural coloration. These structural colours (wing interference patterns: WIPs) may be involved in species recognition and mate choice, yet little is known about the evolutionary processes that shape them. Additionally, existing research has been restric...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The maintenance of considerable genetic variation in sexually selected traits (SSTs) is puzzling given directional selection expected to act on these traits. A possible explanation is the existence of a genotype-by-environment (GxE) interaction for fitness, by which elaborate SSTs are favored in some environments but selected against i...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, immune repertoire profiling with high-throughput sequencing (HTS) has advanced our understanding of adaptive immunity. However, fast progress in the field applied mostly to human and mouse research, with only few studies devoted to other model vertebrates. We present the first in-depth characterization of the T-cell receptor (TCR)...
Data
Fig. S1. Mean fecundity of females developed and maintained at 24°C or 28°C following mating with males maintained at 24°C (squares) or 28°C (circles).
Article
Full-text available
Selection for secondary sexual trait (SST) elaboration may increase intralocus sexual conflict over the optimal values of traits expressed from shared genomes. This conflict can reduce female fitness, and the resulting gender load can be exacerbated by environmental stress, with consequences for a population's ability to adapt to novel environments...
Article
Most cases of alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) are thought to represent conditional strategies, whereby high-status males express highly competitive phenotypes, whereas males below a certain status threshold resort to sneaky tactics. The underlying evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) model assumes that males of high competitive ability achi...
Article
Pathogens are one of the main forces driving the evolution and maintenance of the highly polymorphic genes of the vertebrate major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Although MHC proteins are crucial in pathogen recognition, it is still poorly understood how pathogen‐mediated selection promotes and maintains MHC diversity, and especially so in host...
Article
Mate-guarding strategies are known to evolve in response to changes in the environment, but little is known about the genetic and plastic components of this source of variation. Here, we investigated how risk associated with aggression shapes postcopulatory association time between mates in the bulb mite, Rhizoglyphus robini, a species in which agg...
Preprint
In recent years, immune repertoire profiling with high-throughput sequencing (HTS) has advanced our understanding of adaptive immunity. However, fast progress in the field applied mostly to human and mouse research, with only few studies devoted to other model vertebrates. We present the first in-depth characterization of the TCRβ repertoire in a n...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Recent work suggests that gene duplications may play an important role in the evolution of immunity genes. Passerine birds, and in particular Sylvioidea warblers, have highly duplicated major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, which are key in immunity, compared to other vertebrates. However, reasons for this high MHC gene copy num...
Article
The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a central role in the adaptive immune response and is the most polymorphic gene family in vertebrates. Although high-throughput sequencing has increasingly been used for genotyping families of co-amplifying MHC genes, its potential to facilitate early steps in the characterisation of MHC variation in...
Article
Full-text available
Hamilton’s theory of kin selection explains the evolution of costly traits that benefit other individuals by highlighting the fact that passing genes to offspring is not the only way of increasing the representation of those genes in subsequent generations: Genes are also shared with other classes of relatives. Consequently, any heritable trait tha...
Article
Full-text available
Background The number of partners that individuals mate with over their lifetime is a defining feature of mating systems, and variation in mate number is thought to be a major driver of sexual evolution. Although previous research has investigated the evolutionary consequences of reductions in the number of mates, we know little about the costs and...
Article
The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a central role in the adaptive immune response and is the most polymorphic gene family in vertebrates. Although high-throughput sequencing has increasingly been used for genotyping families of co-amplifying MHC genes, its potential to facilitate early steps in the characterisation of MHC variation in...
Article
Characterisation of highly duplicated genes, such as genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), where multiple loci often co-amplify, has until recently been hindered by insufficient read depths per amplicon. Here we used ultra-deep Illumina sequencing to resolve genotypes at exon 3 of MHC class I genes in the sedge warbler (Acrocephalus...
Article
Heritable alternative reproductive phenotypes (ARPs), which differ in traits associated with competition for mates, occur across taxa. If polymorphism in the genes underlying ARPs is maintained by balancing selection, selection should return ARP proportions to their equilibrium if that equilibrium is perturbed. Here, we used an experimental evoluti...
Article
Full-text available
Intralocus sexual conflict (IASC) prevents males and females from reaching their disparate phenotypic optima and is widespread, but little is known about its genetic underpinnings. In Rhizoglyphus robini, a mite species with alternative male morphs, elevated sexual dimorphism of the armoured fighter males (compared to more feminized scramblers male...
Article
Full-text available
If genetic architectures of various quantitative traits are similar, as studies on model organisms suggest, comparable selection pressures should produce similar molecular patterns for various traits. To test this prediction, we used a laboratory model of vertebrate adaptive radiation to investigate the genetic basis of the response to selection fo...
Article
Full-text available
Maintenance of genetic variance in secondary sexual traits, including bizarre ornaments and elaborated courtship displays, is a central problem of sexual selection theory. Despite theoretical arguments predicting that strong sexual selection leads to a depletion of additive genetic variance, traits associated with mating success show relatively hig...
Article
Full-text available
The Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis proposes that the genetic benefits of preferences for elaborated secondary sexual traits have their origins in the arms race between hosts and parasites, which maintains genetic variance in parasite resistance. Infection, in turn, can be reflected in the expression of costly sexual ornaments. However, the link between im...
Article
According to the genic capture hypothesis, genetic variance in costly sexual traits is maintained because their expression depends on many genes that affect resource acquisition ability. Hence, such traits should constitute a large mutational target and thus show high sensitivity to deleterious mutations. To test this, we exposed male guppies to a...
Article
Full-text available
Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes code for proteins involved in the incitation of the adaptive immune response in vertebrates, which is achieved through binding oligopeptides (antigens) of pathogenic origin. Across vertebrate species, substitutions of amino acids at sites responsible for the specificity of antigen binding (ABS) are posit...
Article
The effects of habitat fragmentation and the resulting decreases in effective population sizes are not easy to document because they take place over many generations and may be affected by factors other than demographic ones. Here, we used 22 microsatellite loci to investigate genetic structure and diversity in populations of edible dormice Glis gl...
Article
Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are revolutionizing the fields of biology and medicine as powerful tools for amplicon sequencing (AS). Using combinations of primers and barcodes, it is possible to sequence targeted genomic regions with deep coverage for hundreds, even thousands, of individuals in a single experiment. This is extremely...
Article
Full-text available
We reared large (1000 individuals) and small (20 individuals) populations of Tribolium castaneum on diet contaminated with copper in order to determine if the size of a population affects its ability to adapt to adverse environmental conditions. After 10 generations, we used microsatellite markers to estimate and subsequently compare the genetic va...
Article
Sexual selection drives fundamental evolutionary processes such as trait elaboration and speciation. Despite this importance, there are surprisingly few examples of genes unequivocally responsible for variation in sexually selected phenotypes. This lack of information inhibits our ability to predict phenotypic change due to universal behaviors, suc...
Article
Full-text available
Experimental evolution combined with genome or transcriptome resequencing (Evolve and Resequence) represents a promising approach for advancing our understanding of the genetic basis of adaptation. Here, we applied this strategy to investigate the effect of selection on a complex trait in lines derived from a natural population of a small mammal. W...
Article
The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are a key component of the adaptive immune system and among the most variable loci in the vertebrate genome. Pathogen-mediated natural selection and MHC-based disassortative mating are both thought to structure MHC polymorphism, but their effects have proven difficult to discriminate in natura...
Article
Full-text available
Mate choice is thought to contribute to the maintenance of the spectacularly high polymorphism of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes, along with balancing selection from parasites, but the relative contribution of the former mechanism is debated. Here, we investigated the association between male MHC genotype and mating success in the...
Article
Full-text available
Among acarid mites, a number of species are characterised by the presence of discontinuous morphologies (armed heteromorphs vs. unarmed homeomorphs) associated with alternative mating tactics (fighting vs. scramble competition). In Rhizoglyphus echinopus, expression of the fighter morph is suppressed, via pheromones, in large, dense colonies. If th...
Article
Full-text available
MHC gene polymorphism is thought to be driven by host-parasite coevolution, but the evidence for an association between the selective pressure from parasites and the number of MHC alleles segregating in a population is scarce and inconsistent. Here, we characterized MHC class I polymorphism in a lizard whose habitat preferences (rock outcrops) lead...
Article
Full-text available
Intralocus sexual conflict results from sexually antagonistic selection on traits shared by the sexes. This can displace males and females from their respective fitness optima, and negative intersexual correlations (rmf) for fitness are the unequivocal indicator of this evolutionary conflict. It has recently been suggested that intersexual fitness...
Article
Genes of the major histocompatibility complex, which are the most polymorphic of all vertebrate genes, are a pre-eminent system for the study of selective pressures that arise from host–pathogen interactions. Balancing selection capable of maintaining high polymorphism should lead to the homogenization of MHC allele frequencies among populations, b...
Data
Table S1. Effect sizes for sex, isoline and their interaction measured using partial Eta squared (ηp2) and Eta squared (η2) for three levels of inbreeding (short, medium and long periods post establishment of isolines) where sex is a fixed effect and isoline is random (SS = sum of squares).
Article
Intralocus sexual conflict (IASC) arises when fitness optima for a shared trait differ between the sexes; such conflict may help maintain genetic variation within populations. Sex-limited expression of sexually antagonistic traits may help resolve the conflict, but the extent of this resolution remains a subject of debate. In species with alternati...