J. M. Weslawski

J. M. Weslawski
Institute of Oceanology Polish Academy of Sciences · Depatment of Ecology

professor

About

224
Publications
68,791
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
7,826
Citations
Citations since 2016
63 Research Items
3836 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500600
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500600
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500600
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500600
Introduction
Main scientific interests: - Arctic coastal waters ecology, food web, climate change/biodiversity interactions - Malacostraca - benthic and pelagic as a group of my specialization and identification knowledge - Sandy shores ecology, integrated coastal zone management
Additional affiliations
September 2013 - October 2013
University Studies on Svalbard
Position
  • invited lecturer
Description
  • course on benthic ecology
April 1993 - January 2016
Institute of Oceanology Polish Academy of Sciences
Position
  • professor, head of the department
June 1985 - present
The Institute of Oceanology of the Polish Academy of Sciences
Position
  • Professor

Publications

Publications (224)
Article
Full-text available
Surface waters of the oceans carry large amounts of material, including sediment grains, plankton organisms, and ice crystals, as well as pollutants, e.g., oil and plastic. Transport and spatio‑temporal distribution of this material depend on its properties and on the dynamical processes in the ocean mixed layer—currents, waves, turbulence, and con...
Article
Full-text available
Complex bottom topography and the presence of floating ice significantly complicate the use of traditional sampling methods in Arctic coastal waters, forcing to look for alternative approaches. One such technique is underwater imagery, which has grown in popularity in recent decades based on its effectiveness in hard-to-reach places. We demonstrate...
Article
Full-text available
In February 2018, the Government of Poland and the International Seabed Authority signed a 15-year contract for exploration of polymetallic sulfide deposits on a section of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge extending between the Hayes, Atlantic and Kane transform faults (32°45.378’ N, 39°57.760’ W to 26°14.411’ N, 44°18.008’ W). The contractor is obliged to c...
Article
Full-text available
The climate affects aquatic ecosystems worldwide, yet the most dramatic impact has been observed in Polar Regions. The presented study aimed to test the hypothesis that changes in biodiversity are linked to changes in the food web functioning under different temperature conditions, with large species dominant in cold waters and smaller species domi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Surface waters of the oceans carry large amounts of material, including sediment grains, plankton organisms, and ice crystals, as well as pollutants, e.g., oil and plastic. Transport and spatio-temporal distribution of this material depend on its properties and on the dynamical processes in the ocean mixed layer – currents, waves, turbulence, and c...
Article
Full-text available
The subject of this study was microplastics (>32 µm), large micro-/macroplastics (>2 mm) and plastic litter (visible by naked eye) contamination on sandy beaches and in coastal waters along the Polish coast of the Baltic Sea. Microplastics were studied with particular attention, with simultaneous observations in the water and across the beach. Othe...
Preprint
Complex bottom topography and the presence of floating ice significantly complicates the use of traditional sampling methods in Arctic coastal waters, forcing to look for alternative approaches. One such technique is underwater imagery, which has grown in popularity in recent decades based on its effectiveness in hard-to-reach places. We demonstrat...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, we estimated the variety and distribution of macroplastics in the central part of Spitsbergen, Svalbard archipelago, Arctic. All marine litter photos were georeferenced, then identified using the OSPAR (2010) classification guide. The majority (90% of all objects) of marine debris was macroplastic with average number in the study are...
Article
Full-text available
Satellite telemetry (ST) has played a critical role in the management and conservation of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) over the last 50 years. ST data provide biological information relevant to subpopulation delineation, movements, habitat use, maternal denning, health, human-bear interactions, and accurate estimates of vital rates and abundance....
Article
Full-text available
The coexistence of two congeneric amphipods, boreal Gammarus oceanicus, and arctic G. setosus, was studied during the summer seasons of 2017-2019 in the region of Isfjorden, Forlandsundet, and Prins Karl Forland island in the west-central part of the Svalbard archipelago (Arctic). Across the study area species distribution often overlapped, but the...
Article
Full-text available
Assessment of the impact of climate change on the Arctic nearshore ecosystems requires knowledge of the “reference points”, that is, the state of things before the effects of the warming become pronounced. For parasites, which play an essential role in the nearshore ecosystems, this knowledge is scarce and fragmentary. This study, based on the mate...
Article
Full-text available
The last two hundred years in the recent history of the Earth have been a period dominated by rapidly increasing human activity. Today, the discussion on the effects of anthropopressure takes the form of critical reflection on the negative impact of humanity on the natural environment. Although sparsely populated, the effects of this impact are par...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The greater human presence in the archipelago of Svalbard through ecotourism, scientific expeditions and shipping increase the potential for the introduction of alien or non-indigenous (non-native) species (NIS). Beaches provide easy access to land-based activities for tourists and scientists, and may therefore become a port of entry for alien spec...
Article
Full-text available
The thermophilic bivalve Mytilus spp. complex has re-appeared in the high Arctic in Svalbard after a thousand years, with the first recent indication of its appearance in 2002 at the mouth of Isfjorden on the west coast. We examine its genetic affinity to selected North Atlantic populations and the modes of spread that may be responsible for its re...
Article
Full-text available
Non-indigenous species (NIS) in the Arctic have an increased likelihood of arrival from ship traffic in the region, while the survival potential of the species becomes more likely in a warming environment. Monitoring is essential to detect the rate and magnitude of the establishment of NIS. In this study, a list of 123 potential marine NIS for Sval...
Article
Full-text available
To monitor the rapid changes occurring in Arctic ecosystems and predict their direction, basic information about the current number and structure of the main components of these systems is necessary. Using boat-based surveys, we studied the numbers and distribution of seabirds foraging in Hornsund (SW Spitsbergen) during three summer seasons. The a...
Article
Full-text available
Hornsund is a typical high-Arctic fjord, with the usual predominance of water masses of the Arctic origin, and associated lipid-rich zooplankton, which is an important food source for many seabird species. The fjord hosts one of the largest concentrations of breeding little auks worldwide, as well as several large colonies of black-legged kittiwake...
Article
Full-text available
The Atlantification of the European Arctic has been an increasingly discussed topic in polar science over the past two decades. The alteration of local marine ecosystems towards a more temperate state and the appearance/range expansion of subarctic-boreal species at higher latitudes is a complex phenomenon induced mainly by the changing properties...
Chapter
Few marine ecosystems exhibit the extreme seasonality observed in the Arctic. Large temporal variations in ambient sunlight, ice cover, and productivity have strong implications for benthic organisms inhabiting the intertidal and shallow subtidal zones. Despite the general belief that the low temperatures of the Arctic present an intense stress on...
Chapter
Full-text available
Coastal waters are among the most productive regions in the Arctic (Leu et al. 2015; Smola et al. 2017; Ardyna et al. 2020). In these areas, a strong coupling exists between the sea and the land, and the shallow depths create a tight pelagic-benthic coupling (McGovern et al. 2020). These regions are also critical breeding and foraging grounds for m...
Article
Full-text available
Teleologia – wywodzące się od czasów starożytnych przekonanie, że wszystkie gatunki istnieją w określonym celu (Stwórca powołał je do życia, nadając im role), ma się zdumiewająco dobrze we współczesnej szkolnej edukacji i praktyce zarządzania środowiskiem. Prowadzi to do przyjęcia założenia o człowieku jako „dobrym ogrodniku”, który wybiera gatunki...
Article
Full-text available
Over thirty species of littoral marine Gammaridea occur along the coasts of the North Atlantic. From one to several species can coexist in a single region. There is an evident, inverse relationship between egg incubation time and temperature (from 14 to >120 days) and consequent trends in the size of the animals on reaching maturity (from 5 mm in w...
Chapter
Full-text available
Polar Crustacea show high taxonomic and functional diversity and hold crucial roles within regional food webs. Despite the differences in the evolutionary history of the two Polar regions, present data suggest rather similar species richness, with over 2,250 taxa recorded in the Antarctic and over 1,930 noted in the Arctic. A longer duration of iso...
Article
Full-text available
In this work, we show the results from two different types of approaches designed to map the Arctic (Polar) perception of young learners in Poland and Lithuania. The first case study is composed of both closed and open questions (Case Study 1), while the second one is a closed, multiple choice type of questionnaire (Case Study 2). We have questione...
Chapter
Scientists generally believe that the products of photosynthesis raining down from above support the community of organisms living on the ocean bottom deeper than light can reach. Consequently, we have assumed that during the Polar Night, when there is insufficient light for photosynthesis, these communities enter a stage of torpor, and little occu...
Article
Full-text available
Polar Research gained bigger than ever extent and support, both on the state-political and the wide public level. We want to start the discussion on how the public concern is formed, and what are the inspirations that drive researchers to choose this type of career. It seems that in the non-Arctic country like Poland the sentiment, associated with...
Article
Full-text available
Thirty-one tidewater glacier bays in Spitsbergen Island were visited by yachts in August 2011, 2015, 2016 and 2017. Surface water samples were taken by volunteers, the members of the yacht crews, to measure concentrations of suspended matter, salinity, and temperature. Secchi disc measurements were used to measure water transparency. A series of ph...
Article
Full-text available
The distribution of two common intertidal amphipod species Gammarus oceanicus and Gammarus setosus was studied along the coast of Svalbard Archipelago. Genetic analysis showed geographical homogeneity of G. oceanicus with only one molecular operational taxonomic unit (MOTU) and much higher diversification of G. setosus (5 MOTUs) in the studied area...
Preprint
Full-text available
n Citizen Science, members of the general public collaborate with scientists to generate and use data relating to the natural world. For the many fields of marine research, this is a particularly powerful approach which should not be overlooked. The sheer scale of coastal and ocean environments mean that it would take several lifetimes for scientis...
Preprint
Full-text available
Navigating the Future is a publication series produced by the European Marine Board providing future perspectives on marine science and technology in Europe. Navigating the Future V (NFV) highlights new knowledge obtained since Navigating the Future IV (2013). It is set within the framework of the 2015 Paris Agreement and builds on the scientific b...
Chapter
The main objective of this work is to present a detailed outline of an Arctic fjord ecosystem model using Kongsfjorden-Krossfjorden as a case study. Marine ecosystem models are compared, with emphasis on fjord models, towards defining best available modelling technologies. This comparison is based on an analysis of the differences in the variables...
Book
Full-text available
Navigating the Future is a publication series produced by the European Marine Board providing future perspectives on marine science and technology in Europe. Navigating the Future V (NFV) highlights new knowledge obtained since Navigating the Future IV1 (2013). It is set within the framework of the 2015 Paris Agreement2 and builds on the scienti c...
Article
Full-text available
The democratization of ocean observation has the potential to add millions of observations every day. Though not a solution for all ocean monitoring needs, citizen scientists offer compelling examples showcasing their ability to augment and enhance traditional research and monitoring. Information they are providing is increasing the spatial and tem...
Article
Full-text available
Current knowledge of the Arctic marine ecosystem is based primarily on studies performed during the polar day on the pelagic and benthic realms. Both the polar night and the hyperbenthic layer remain as substantial knowledge gaps in our understanding of the marine system at high latitudes. This study investigated the hyperbenthic food web in Kongsf...
Article
Full-text available
The recent (2008–2016) occurrence of a boreal intertidal amphipod Gammarus oceanicus along the Spitsbergen coast is compared with corresponding data from 1980 to 1994. We aimed to compare the pace of environmental changes in the area (ice retreat, temperature increase) with distribution change of G. oceanicus. Material for the study was collected f...
Article
Full-text available
The 100 km long west coast of Prins Karl Forlandet (westernmost island of Svalbard archipelago) was assessed for the density of macro-plastic litter. The most numerous were fragments of fishing gear (buoys, ropes, nets) followed by various containers, sheets of foil and plastic textiles. The total density was estimated at 14 400 items with a total...
Book
Full-text available
Body size is a fundamental biological unit that is closely coupled to key ecological properties and processes. Decline in organisms' body-size has been recently predicted to be the third universal biological response to global warming (alongside changes in phenology and distribution of species) in both aquatic and terrestrial systems. The main goal...
Article
Full-text available
Benthic total oxygen uptake (TOU) was measured in two Arctic fjords (NW Spitsbergen shelf) with different hydrological regimes: Hornsund with "cold" coastal Arctic waters and Kongsfjorden with "warm" Atlantic shelf waters. TOU rates in Kongsfjorden were more than 50% higher than in Hornsund. This is presumably related to the relatively higher bioma...
Article
Full-text available
Hornsund and Kongsfjorden are two similar-sized Arctic fjords on the West coast of Spitsbergen. They are influenced by cold coastal Arctic water (Hornsund) and warmer Atlantic water (Kongsfjorden). Environmental conditions affect the timing, quantity, spatial distribution (horizontal and vertical) of spring and summer blooms of protists as well as...
Article
Full-text available
Bacterial production and the accompanying environmental factors were measured in the water columns of two Arctic fjords during the cruise in July and August 2013. Water samples were collected at six stations located in the central part of Hornsund and Kongsfjorden. In Hornsund, where average water temperatures were 1.25-fold lower than in Kongsfjor...
Article
Full-text available
We present the results of species distribution modeling conducted on macrobenthic occurrence data collected between 2002 and 2014 in Arctic fjord – Hornsund. We focus on species from Mollusca and Crustacea taxa. This study investigates the importance of individual environmental factors for benthic species distribution, with a special emphasis on bo...
Article
Full-text available
Chapter
1. Humans are an imperative component of the Earth’s ecosystems as we transform them to meet our economic and cultural needs. 2. Seas and oceans contribute to the local, regional and global development of human society. The downside of this development is environmental deterioration resulting from increasing competition for sea space and coastal ar...
Article
Full-text available
Two high latitude fjords of Spitsbergen (Hornsund 77°N and Kongsfjorden 79°N) are regarded as being highly productive (70g and 50gCm⁻²year⁻¹) and having organic-rich sediments. Hornsund has more organic matter in its sediments (8%), nearly half of it of terrestrial origin, while most of that in Kongsfjorden (5%) comes from fresh, marine sources (mi...
Article
Full-text available
Citizen Science is an approach which involves members of the public in gathering scientific data and, in more advanced cases, also involves them in the analysis of such data and in the design of scientific research. Benefits of this approach include enhancing monitoring capabilities, empowering citizens and increasing Ocean Literacy, which can itse...
Article
Full-text available
This work presents biological information for polar cod (Boreogadus saida) collected with a Campelen 1800 shrimp bottom trawl in Kongsfjorden (two stations located in the inner part of the fjord adjacent to the glacier) and Rijpfjorden (one station at the entrance to the fjord) in September and October 2013. The otolith-based ages of polar cod coll...
Article
Full-text available
Two fjords in West Spitsbergen (Hornsund 77°N and Kongsfjorden 79°N) differ with regard to their exposure towards increasingly warm Atlantic water inflow. Hornsund remains in many respects cooler than Kongsfjorden (on average 2°C SST in summer) and is less influenced by warmer and more saline Atlantic waters. Reported changes in the physical enviro...
Article
Full-text available
Although the processes occurring at the front of an ice face in tidewater glacier bays still await thorough investigation, their importance to the rapidly changing polar environment is spurring a considerable research effort. Glacier melting, sediment delivery and the formation of seabird foraging hotspots are governed by subglacial discharges of m...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines the performance of pelagic and benthic Malacostraca in two glacial fjords of west Spitsbergen: Kongsfjorden, strongly influenced by warm Atlantic waters, and Hornsund which, because of the strong impact of the cold Sørkapp Current, has more of an Arctic character. The material was collected during 12 summer expeditions organized...
Article
In the frame of the COST ACTION ‘EMBOS’ (Development and implementation of a pan-European Marine Biodiversity Observatory System), coverage of intertidal macroalgae was estimated at a range of marine stations along the European coastline (Subarctic, Baltic, Atlantic, Mediterranean). Based on these data, we tested whether patterns in macroalgal dive...
Article
Full-text available
Examining how variability in population abundance and distribution is allotted among different spatial scales can inform of processes that are likely to generate that variability. Results of studies dealing with scale issues in marine benthic communities suggest that variability is concentrated at small spatial scales (from tens of centimetres to f...