J. Angel Soto-Centeno

J. Angel Soto-Centeno
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey | Rutgers · Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences

PhD Biology

About

40
Publications
9,559
Reads
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488
Citations
Introduction
My research explores the evolutionary and ecological processes that contribute to diversification and species loss in insular bats. Extinction and phylogeography are the central organizing principles of my research program. I combine multiple methods and disciplines such as computational biology, ecology, paleontology, phylogenetics, population genetics, field biology, and museum-based research. Check out: www.mormoops.com
Additional affiliations
September 2017 - present
Rutgers University, Newark
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
October 2016 - August 2017
American Museum of Natural History
Position
  • Researcher
March 2016 - November 2017
American Museum of Natural History
Position
  • Research Associate
Education
August 2007 - December 2013
University of Florida
Field of study
  • Evolutionary Biology

Publications

Publications (40)
Preprint
A bstract Defining species limits using an integrative framework is crucial for biodiversity assessments and to maintain taxonomic stability. These approaches are robust and can be useful to also validate the status of species that are uncommon and underrepresented in biological collections. We examined the species limits and validated the taxonomi...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanization and natural disasters can disrupt landscape connectivity, effectively isolating populations and increasing the risk of local extirpation particularly in island systems. To understand how fragmentation affects corridors among forested areas, we used circuit theory to model the landscape connectivity of the endemic bat Stenoderma rufum w...
Data
Supplementary Material of the manuscript: Effect of land use, habitat suitability, and hurricanes on the population connectivity of an endemic insular bat. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-88616-7
Preprint
Full-text available
Habitat loss and fragmentation are a leading cause of vertebrate population declines and extinction. Urbanization and natural disasters disrupt landscape connectivity, effectively isolating populations and increasing the risk of local extirpation particularly in island systems. Puerto Rico, one of the most isolated islands in the Caribbean, is home...
Article
The Caribbean archipelago is a hotspot of biodiversity characterized by a high rate of extinction. Recent studies have examined these losses, but the causes of the Antillean Late Quaternary vertebrate extinctions , and especially the role of humans, are still unclear. Previous results provide support for climate-related and human-induced extinction...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Caribbean archipelago is a hotspot of biodiversity characterized by a high rate of extinction. Recent studies have examined these losses, but the causes of the Antillean Late Quaternary vertebrate extinctions, and especially the role of humans, are still unclear. Current results provide support for climate-related and human-induced extinctions,...
Article
We report a mid- to late-Holocene, non-cultural vertebrate assemblage from Garden Cave (site EL-229), Eleuthera Island, The Bahamas, with 2450 fossils representing 26 species. The chronology is based on accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) radiocarbon (¹⁴C) dates determined directly on individual bones of the hutia (Geocapromys ingrahami), an extirp...
Article
Full-text available
Dispersal is a driving factor in the creation and maintenance of biodiversity, yet little is known about the effects of habitat variation and geography on dispersal and population connectivity in most mammalian groups. Bats of the family Molossidae are fast-flying mammals thought to have potentially high dispersal ability, and recent studies have i...
Article
Early genetic studies in the south-eastern United States provided the foundation for ideas in the field of comparative phylogeography, but few direct comparisons with consistent sampling across taxa exist for this region. We investigate the influence of historical processes and species-level characteristics on phylogeographic structure within four...
Article
A new species of the nectarivorous bat genus Hsunycteris is described from lowland Amazonian forest in northeastern Peru. The new species, H. dashe, can be distinguished from other congeners by its larger size; V-shaped array of dermal chin papillae separated by a wide basal cleft; metacarpal V longer than metacarpal IV; broad rostrum; lateral marg...
Article
Full-text available
Accurate accounts of both living and fossil mammal communities are critical for creating biodiversity inventories and understanding patterns of changing species diversity through time. We combined data from from14 new fossil localities with literature accounts and museum records to document the bat biodiversity of Haiti through time. We also report...
Data
List of specimens examined per species for Trouing Jean Paul, Haiti, from the UF Vertebrate Paleontology collection in Gainesville, FL. (PDF)
Data
Descriptions for all localities where living or fossil bats have been documented in Haiti. Verbatim elevation (in meters) provided for previously published localities if available. Elevation for new localities reported in this study estimated via GoogleEarth. (XLSX)
Article
Full-text available
We report eight new accelerator-mass spectrometer (AMS) radiocarbon (¹⁴C) dates performed directly on individual bones of extirpated species from Crooked Island, The Bahamas. Three dates from the hutia (Geocapromys ingrahami), recovered from a culturally derived bone assemblage in McKay's Bluff Cave (site CR-5), all broadly overlap from AD 1450 to...
Article
Full-text available
Knowing whether a species has been extirpated, or if it ever inhabited a specific geographic area, has direct importance for planning conservation activities. The taruka ( Hippocamelus antisensis ) is one of the largest Neotropical mammals; it is distributed in the central Andes, and there are published records of this species in Ecuador. Recently,...
Article
Full-text available
The bat family Mormoopidae includes three species with distributions in the Caribbean. These taxa—Mormoops blainvillei, Pteronotus parnellii, and P. quadridens—roost predominantly in hot cave chambers where temperatures may reach 40° C and humidity is close to 100%. We tested the hypothesis that mormoopid bat extirpations in this region were due to...
Article
Full-text available
We report 95 vertebrate taxa (13 fishes, 11 reptiles, 63 birds, 8 mammals) from late Pleistocene bone deposits in Sawmill Sink, Abaco, The Bahamas. The >5,000 fossils were recovered by scuba divers on ledges at depths of 27-35 m below sea level. Of the 95 species, 39 (41%) no longer occur on Abaco (4 reptiles, 31 birds, 4 mammals). We estimate that...
Article
Full-text available
We combined novel radiocarbon dates of bat fossils with time-scaled ecological niche models (ENM) to study bat extinctions in the Caribbean. Radiocarbon-dated fossils show that late Quaternary losses of bat populations took place during the late Holocene (<4 ka) rather than late Pleistocene (>10 ka). All bat radiocarbon dates from Abaco (Bahamas) t...
Article
Full-text available
The Bahamas are well known for their karst landscape, with vast cave systems and inundated caves called blue holes that formed during the Pleistocene. Despite this, the biota of these islands has not been well documented when compared to other West Indian islands. It is important that Bahamians have the knowledge and tools to preserve the flora and...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the dietary needs of syntopic species is essential for examining species coexistence and resource partitioning. We analysed stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) to estimate the diet of two putative nectarivorous bats on Puerto Rico, the brown flower bat (Erophylla bombifrons) and the Greater Antillean long-tongued bat...
Article
Full-text available
The organic quality of caves allows for the presence of potentially pathogenic microorganisms, which can be transmitted to humans via contact with soils, water, or guano. The goal of this comparative study was to describe the microbial diversity, primarily bacteria and fungi, within cave substrates. The purpose seeks to increase awareness and minim...
Article
Full-text available
We evaluated the mtDNA divergence and relationships within Geomys pinetis to assess the status of formerly recognized Geomys taxa. Additionally, we integrated new hypothesis-based tests in ecological niche models (ENM) to provide greater insight into causes for divergence and potential barriers to gene flow in Southeastern United States (Alabama, F...
Conference Paper
Species distributions inferred from ecological niche models (ENM) assume accurate estimation of conditions in which species can survive and their corresponding geographic limits. Sister species of Neotropical singing mice (genus Scotinomys) segre- gate altitudinally in the highlands of Costa Rica and Panamá, where S. teguina occurs from ~1000-2900m...
Article
Full-text available
Predicting the geographic distribution of widespread species through modeling is problematic for several reasons including high rates of omission errors. One potential source of error for modeling widespread species is that subspecies and/or races of species are frequently pooled for analyses, which may mask biologically relevant spatial variation...
Poster
Full-text available
The specimen tag replacement project for the herpetology collection at the San Diego Natural History Museum started in 2008 and is scheduled for completion in the summer of 2010. The collection holds 75,000 catalogued amphibian and reptile specimens and has significant holdings in the biological diverse regions of California and Baja California. To...
Article
Full-text available
We performed the first quantitative survey of ectoparasitic assemblages on three species of mormoopid bats living on the Caribbean island of Puerto Rico: Mormoops blainvillii Leach (n=40), Pteronotus quadridens Gundlach (n=40), and Pteronotus parnellii Gray (n=9). We examined bats for parasites primarily on 8-10 May and 24-27 July 2002 at Culebrone...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Summary Report: Trapping activities during the Fall of 2005 at the Sentenac Cienaga, Anza Borrego Desert State Park were completed by the Department of Herpetology, San Diego Natural History Museum in a work exchange with the UC Davis Wildlife Health Center.
Article
Full-text available
We examined the diet of 2 island-dwelling phyllostomids, the brown flower bat (Erophyfla sezekorni) and the Greater Antillean long-tongued bat (Monophyllus redmani), by analyzing fecal contents and pollen swabs from > 100 individuals of each species. Although both bats are putative nectar-feeders, their feeding niches were differentiated. A greater...
Article
Full-text available
Record of Ensatina eschscholtzii klauberi in Sierra Juarez, Baja California
Article
Full-text available
The temperature preferences of the mormoopid and phyllostomid bats Pteronotus quadridens and Erophylla sezekorni, from the West Indies, were determined in the laboratory and compared to field observations. Pteronotus quadridens was invariably found within the deepest and hottest parts of caves, at temperatures between 28°C and 35°C, while E. sezeko...
Article
Full-text available
The nectarivorous brown flower bat, Ero- phylla sezekorni, lives in the Greater Antilles and in some of the Bahamas, Caicos, and Cayman islands (Baker et al., 1978). There are two subspecies, E. s. sezekorni and E. s. bombifrons, with the latter restricted to His- paniola and Puerto Rico. This bat roosts in large colonies in the cooler portions of...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Our goal is to contribute and help expand the knowledge of Greater Antillean, especially Cuban, paleontology through the analyses of fossils, stable isotopes, carbon geochemistry, trace elements, and biogeography.
Project
We are currently evaluating the morphological skull variation of Cuban capromyid rodents and bat species using two dimensional geometric morphometric and comparative phylogenetic methods. We will quantify the intra-specific morphological variation and amount of fluctuating asymmetry among populations across Cuban archipelago. The objective will be to evaluate the importance of the environmental and geographical gradients on the patterning morphological variation in Cuban mammals.