J. David Rogers

J. David Rogers
Missouri University of Science and Technology | Missouri S&T · Department of Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering

Doctor of Philosophy

About

172
Publications
239,904
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,000
Citations
Introduction
J. David Rogers is Professor and Karl F. Hasselmann Chair in Geological Engineering at the Missouri University of Science & Technology. His research has focused on regional landslide hazard mapping & evaluations, earthquake site response-liquefaction-lateral spread features, levee and flood control/protection, fluvial geomorphology, groundwater and geohydrology, natural and man-made dams, passive detection of underground tunnels/conduits, geotechnical site characterization, virtual geotechnical databases, geoforensic studies, karst features, and evolution of geotechnics theory and professional practice. From 1984-2001 he operated consulting firms with offices in the San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Honolulu metro areas. He served on the Berkeley civil engineering faculty from 1994-2001.
Additional affiliations
August 2001 - May 2022
Missouri University of Science and Technology
Position
  • Professor with Endowed Chair
Description
  • Since July 2001 I have held the Karl F. Hasselmann Missouri Chair in Geological Engineering, the only endowed chair in geological engineering in the United States. I have introduced several potential failure modes (PFMs) presently employed for probabalistic hazard evaluations of risk. These include the construction of dams against prehistoric landslides and identification of prehistoric catastrophic outbreak floods when landslide dams breach.
August 1994 - July 2001
University of California, Berkeley
Position
  • Lecturer in Engineering Geology
Education
July 1979 - June 1982
University of California, Berkeley
Field of study
  • Geological and Geotechnical Engineering
September 1976 - June 1979
University of California, Berkeley
Field of study
  • Civil Engineering
June 1974 - June 1976

Publications

Publications (172)
Article
The Vermilion and Echo Cliffs form a nearly continuous escarpment more than 160 km long within the Colorado Plateau physiographic province of North America. The cliffs overlie the Marble Platform in northern Arizona and are located along the Colorado River, just upstream of the Grand Canyon. Large rotational block landslides mantle the erosional es...
Article
Landslide inventory mapping is vital for hazard vulnerability and mitigation in mountainous terrain. The present study seeks to tentatively identify large bedrock landslides and related features across the Gilgit area in the Gilgit-Baltistan Province of Pakistan using the expert-driven knowledge of anomalous topographic features. For this, a topogr...
Article
Full-text available
The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) has historically recorded some of the largest intensity earthquakes in North America, including significant earth movements that resulted in about 2000 felt earthquakes during 1811–1812. The region continues to experience mass wasting due to earth movements. The aim of this study is to understand the influence of...
Article
Landslides pose a significant hazard to life and property in areas vulnerable to mass movements. Qualitative landslide susceptibility maps offer a preliminary means of screening locations likely susceptible to slope instability. In this study, attempts have been made to identify various landslide hazard zones within the Hunza River watershed (varyi...
Preprint
Full-text available
The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) has historically recorded some of the largest intensity earthquakes in North America, including significant earth movements that resulted in about 2,000 felt earthquakes during 1811-1812. The region continues to experience mass wasting due to earth movements. The aim of this study is to understand the influence of...
Article
Full-text available
Electrical resistivity tomography data were acquired in proximity to the coal combustion residual landfill in an effort to image and analyze seepage pathways through the shallow residual soil and underlying karsted limestone bedrock. The water table is at a depth of more than 45 m. The most prominent subsurface seepage pathways identified on the ac...
Article
The New Madrid Seismic Zone, located in the central United States, produced five earthquakes in 1811–1812, 1843, and 1895, ranging from strong to major. A recurrence of its activity would cause substantial damage to the central U.S., but the magnitude of the most likely event is debatable. Accounting for 0.2 s spectral accelerations (SA) and peak g...
Article
Unmanned aerial systems (UAS) provide a framework for recording perishable surficial data or information. Open fractures exhibiting regular en-echelon patterns were captured by a 12-megapixel, FL-9 mm camera attached to a Phantom IV UAS over the epicenter of the magnitude (Mw) 5.8 earthquake of September 3, 2016, 15 months later. The Digital Surfac...
Article
Full-text available
What should we all learn from historic failures of engineering systems? In 1977, British civil engineers P.G. Silby and A.C. Walker published a memorable article, “Structural Accidents and Their Causes,” in the Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers in London. Their most sobering conclusion was that spectacular failures of particular typ...
Chapter
Engineering geology is the application of geologic information to aid in realistic characterization of construction sites for the design of suitable foundations, and support thereof, which can reasonably be expected to withstand all of the probable loads to which said structures might someday be dealt. This includes characterizing geological materi...
Preprint
This is a preprint of the article accompanying my presentation for the Golden spike 150th anniversary History Symposium sponsored by the American Society of Civil Engineers in Sacramento on May 6, 2019.
Article
Full-text available
Mass wasting and tectonic uplift are the major factors, responsible for reshaping the northern Pakistan that contains the world’s most steeply inclined mountainous regions including: Karakoram, Himalayas, and Hindukush Ranges. The role of GIS and remote sensing is inevitable to study the river geomorphology for the identification and evaluation of...
Article
Full-text available
Temperature is one of the variables that influence the elasto-plastic behavior and integrity of rock outcrops. Fluctuations in temperature can trigger alteration of some of the mineral properties and impact the brittle-plastic transition. Initiation and propagation of thermally-induced tension cracks tend to weaken most rock types. The principal go...
Poster
The hazard susceptibility mapping of landslides in the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) on the Cape Girardeau and Gordonville quadrangles show the underlying geology (formations, folds, and faults), slope inclination, and hydrology. These variables influence the potential for landslides triggered by precipitation and earthquakes. Using geographically...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Temperature is one of several variables that can adversely impact the dynamic behavior of rocks by altering their geo-mechanical behavior. This study highlights the role of temperature changes on the measurement of resonance frequency (Fr) and quality factor (Q) parameters of selected rocks under different ranges of loading frequency. The samples f...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
John Frank Stevens began his civil engineering career as a rodman on a survey crew in Maine in 1872. He soon moved to Minneapolis, where he apprenticed himself, eventually becoming Assistant City Engineer. In 1876 he began working for railroads in the western United States. In 1882 Stevens began working for a contractor laying tracks for the Canadi...
Article
Full-text available
The kingpin structure of the American scheme to construct a ship canal across Panama in 1907–1914 was an earthen dam of unprecedented scale and scope at Gatun, to retain the aggregate flow of the Chagres River and its principal tributaries. Upon this structure alone, the entire plan rested, because it created the man-made lake rising 85 ft (25.9 m)...
Article
Full-text available
Sinkholes are inherent features of the karst terrain of 1 Greene County, Missouri, that present hazards and engineering challenges to construction/infrastructure development. Analysis of relationships between the spatial distribution of sinkholes and possible influencing factors can help in understanding the controls involved in the formation of si...
Article
Full-text available
This article summarizes an exploratory study carried out to investigate the significance of various geomorphic features on the formation of observed knickpoints along the upper Indus River in northern Pakistan. These features include bedrock lithology, active faults, sediment flux from tributary channels, and landslide dams which have blocked the m...
Article
Full-text available
Alexander Dam is a hydraulic fill earth dam and the second-highest embankment dam in Hawaii, having been built in 1929-1932 on the south side of the Hawai-ian island of Kauai to provide irrigation for McBryde Sugar Company Ltd. It was constructed across Wahi-awa Stream mauka (Hawaiian for "stream that comes from the mountains," literally "toward th...
Article
Full-text available
This article summarizes an investigation into the likely role of landsliding in the formation of knickpoints along the Indus River in northern Pakistan. The knickpoints and their related geomorphic parameters (channel profile, concavity, drainage area, steepness index, etc.) were extracted from ASTER digital elevation models (DEMs) with 30 m resolu...
Article
Full-text available
The liquefaction potential index (LPI) has increasingly been used for assessing liquefaction hazards induced by earthquake shaking. The LPI allows an integral number of soil horizons to be evaluated for liquefaction potential. Considerable uncertainty exists in cases where the LPI thresholds for classifying liquefaction hazards statistically rely o...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In February 1986 a narrow levee break occurred along the left bank of the Yuba River near its mouth with the Feather River. The breach inundated the towns of Linda and Olivehurst, California, inundating more than 4000 homes and businesses, displacing more than 24,000 residents, and causing over $400 million in damages. Eyewitness accounts described...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The St. Francis Dam was built by the City of Los Angeles Bureau of Water Works and Supply (BWWS) in 1925-26 as a curved concrete gravity dam, approximately 200 feet high in San Francisquito Canyon, about 35 miles northeast of downtown Los Angeles. The reservoir provided an additional 38,000 acre-feet of storage from the Los Angeles Aqueduct. The da...
Conference Paper
William “Bill” Mulholland (1855-1935) a self-taught civil engineer, who at the zenith of his career was the highest paid public official in California and the most respected man in Los Angeles in 1926. His storied career came to an abrupt end with the catastrophic failure of the St. Francis Dam in March 1928. A native of Belfast, Mulholland took to...
Article
Full-text available
This study tentatively identified large bedrock landslide features across the Bashilo River, a tributary of the upper Blue Nile River of Ethiopia, using a geospatial mapping approach. The study aims to highlight the utilization of low-cost mapping techniques that might be applicable across large tracts of land (between 1000 and 500,000 km2). Topogr...
Article
Full-text available
The detection of underground cavities is of significant concern to geotechnical engineers working in karst terrain, or those searching for tunnels or buried utilities. In spite of the marked progress in nondestructive geophysical methods for detecting shallow underground voids, no unique methodology has emerged that can be applied globally. Various...
Article
Full-text available
This research was carried out to prepare the regional level landslide susceptibility maps by incorporating the oblique rainfall raster in the upper Blue Nile and Tekeze River basins. The oblique rainfall is the amount that actually falls on sloping surfaces, and varies considerably with slope inclination and aspect with respect to the prevailing tr...
Presentation
Full-text available
The detection of underground cavities is of principal concern for various purposes, ranging from engineering projects to border security controls. In spite of the marked progress in nondestructive geophysical methods for detecting shallow underground voids, no unique method has emerged which can be applied globally. Seismic methods have often been...
Article
Full-text available
Naturally occurring landslides can be difficult to characterize and often exhibit anomalies in controlling geometry and consistency. The characterization of landslides in engineering geology practice is usually based on program of subsurface exploration; focused on identifying subsurface materials, structure and stratigraphy, hydrologic conditions,...
Article
We present probabilistic and deterministic seismic and liquefaction hazard maps for the densely populated St. Louis metropolitan area that account for the expected effects of surficial geology on earthquake ground shaking. Hazard calculations were based on a map grid of 0.005°, or about every 500 m, and are thus higher in resolution than any earlie...
Poster
Full-text available
The detection of underground cavities is of significant concern to geotechnical engineers working in karst terrain. In spite of the marked progress in nondestructive geophysical methods for detecting shallow underground voids, no unique methodology has emerged that can be applied globally. Various studies have been performed on the use of Rayleigh...
Article
Full-text available
Rainfall is one of the major triggering factors for landsliding, every year it causes hundreds of slides across the worlds especially in the steeply inclined mountainous areas like northern Pakistan. The topography influence of wind driven rainfall is usually neglected in conventional correlations between rainfall with the landslide occurrence. Wi...
Article
Full-text available
Rainfall is one of the most significant triggering factors for shallow landslides, raveling, and erosion of over-steepened slopes, especially in steeply inclined mountainous regions, such as the western Greater Himalayan Mountains of northern Pakistan. The influence of wind-driven rainfall is usually neglected in comparisons between rainfall and ma...
Article
Full-text available
This research utilized the cost-effective methods for regional landslide characterization to serve as “roadmap” for more detailed landslide subsurface characterization. ASTER DEM’s data with 30 m resolution and topographic maps with 40 m resolution were used for this regional scale landslide study to explore the foundation for the concepts embedded...
Article
Sand transport to the Mississippi River Delta (MRD) remains sufficient to build wetlands in shallow, sheltered coastal bays fed by engineered diversions on the Mississippi River (MR) and its Atchafalaya River (AR) distributary. But suspended mud (silt & clay) flux to the coast has dropped from a mean of 390 Mt y⁻¹ in the early 1950s, to 100 Mt y⁻¹...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Isambard Kingdom Brunel was a builder of bridges, tunnels, steamships, steam locomotives, railways, and gas engines. He was Briton’s most famous engineer, and voted second Greatest Briton (after Winston Churchill) in a BBC poll. Like Churchill, he was also the son of an American. When his massive vessel, the Great Eastern, was launched in January 1...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Donald Roebling was the great grandson of fabled bridge engineer John Augustus Roebling, who designed the Brooklyn Bridge. He grew up in Bernardsville, New Jersey and moved to Clearwater, Florida in 1929. His arrived about six months after the Great Lake Okeechobee Hurricane of September 16, l928, which swept across Lake Okeechobee, inundating newl...
Article
Practical methods of mapping earthflows and earthflow complexes using topographic recognition keys are briefly profiled in this article. These methods can be employed to tentatively identify earthflow features that may not be recognized on stereopair aerial photographs because of vegetation, mollification of the features with age, and/or unfavorabl...
Article
Full-text available
This study summarizes the continuation of a series of regional landslide inventories undertaken in Northern Pakistan. Mass wasting appears to be the dominant process shaping the morphology of the main river channel in the Hunza River watershed. The project included assembling an inventory of historic mass wasting features in the basin, especially,...
Data
Full-text available
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study summarizes the continuation of a series of regional landslide inventories undertaken in Northern Pakistan. The project included assembling an inventory of historic mass wasting features in the basin, including landslides, rock falls, and rock avalanches, and debris obstructions, especially, those along the Hunza River. A hillshade topogr...
Article
Full-text available
This research was aimed to investigate the effect of densification on the shear strength of the Simbal Landslide, which was triggered by intense rainfall in October, 2005 along the M2 Lahore Islamabad Motorway in Pakistan. Subsurface ssamples were extracted from the zone close to the basal rupture surface to allow assessment of the mobilized shear...