J. Kevin O’Regan

J. Kevin O’Regan
Paris Descartes, CPSC | Paris 5 · Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception (UMR 8158)

About

224
Publications
62,130
Reads
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15,181
Citations
Citations since 2016
56 Research Items
4533 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220200400600
20162017201820192020202120220200400600

Publications

Publications (224)
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated the potential for the development of novel perceptual experiences through sustained training with a sensory augmentation device. We developed (1) a new geomagnetic sensory augmentation device, the NaviEar, and (2) a battery of tests for automaticity in the use of the device. The NaviEar translates head direction toward north...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
When leaving the aquatic constrained environment of the womb, newborns are thrown into the world with essentially new laws and regularities that govern their interactions with the environment. Here, we study how spontaneous self-contacts can provide material for learning implicit models of the body and its action possibilities in the environment. S...
Article
Full-text available
Infants start to use a spoon for self-feeding at the end of the first year of life, but usually do not use unfamiliar tools to solve problems before the age of 2 years. We investigated to what extent 18-month-old infants who are familiar with using a spoon for self-feeding are able to generalize this tool-use ability to retrieve a distant object. W...
Article
Full-text available
Infants’ ability to monitor “sensorimotor contingencies,” i.e., the sensory effects of their own actions, is an important mechanism underlying learning. One method that has been used to investigate this is the “mobile paradigm,” in which a mobile above an infant’s crib is activated by motion of one of the infant’s limbs. Although successfully used...
Preprint
This literature review examines how babies’ body know-how develops during the first year of life. It surveys studies describing this development through the exploration of the body and of the physical environment. This early development may help babies acquire a sense of agency and a sense of body ownership. The development of body know-how, as a p...
Article
To benefit from the exploration of their bodies and their physical and social environments, infants need to detect sensorimotor contingencies linking their actions to sensory feedback. This ability, which seems to be present in babies from birth and even in utero, has been widely used by researchers in their study of early development. However, a c...
Article
Cette revue de la littérature propose d’examiner de quelle manière le savoir-faire corporel du bébé s’affine au cours de la première année de vie, en décrivant ce développement à travers l’exploration du corps et l’exploration de l’environnement physique. Ce développement précoce pourrait participer à l’acquisition par le bébé d’un sens de l’agenti...
Article
This literature review examines how babies’ body know-how develops during the first year of life. It surveys studies describing this development through the exploration of the body and of the physical environment. This early development may help babies acquire a sense of agency and a sense of body ownership. The development of body know-how, as a p...
Article
Full-text available
Much current work in robotics focuses on the development of robots capable of autonomous unsupervised learning. An essential prerequisite for such learning to be possible is that the agent should be sensitive to the link between its actions and the consequences of its actions, called sensorimotor contingencies. This sensitivity, and more particular...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to sense and use the body parts in an organized and differentiated manner is a precursor of body knowledge in infancy. To acquire this ability, the infant's brain might explore the perceptual consequences of its bodily actions. Undifferentiated body movements would gradually be replaced by more precise actions. Only a very few studies h...
Preprint
In order to benefit from the exploration of their body and their physical and social environment, infants need to detect sensorimotor contingencies linking their actions to sensory feedback. This ability, which seems to be present in babies from birth and even in utero, has been widely used by researchers in their study of early development. Howeve...
Preprint
The ability to perceive and use the body parts in an organised and differentiated manner is a precursor of body knowledge in infancy. To acquire this ability, the infant’s brain might explore the perceptual consequences of its bodily actions. Undifferentiated body movements would gradually be replaced by more precise actions. Only a very few papers...
Preprint
When do infants start to understand that they can grasp an object by its handle when the interesting part is out of reach? Whereas it is known from preferential looking tasks that already at three months of age infants show surprise when all parts of an object do not move together, little is known about when infants are able to use such knowledge i...
Preprint
Much current work in robotics focuses on the development of robots capable of autonomous unsupervised learning. An essential prerequisite for such learning to be possible is that the agent should be sensitive to the link between its actions and the consequences of its actions, called sensorimotor contingencies. This sensitivity, and more particular...
Preprint
Humans are extremely swift learners. We are able to grasp highly abstract notions, whether they come from art perception or pure mathematics. Current machine learning techniques demonstrate astonishing results in extracting patterns in information. Yet the abstract notions we possess are more than just statistical patterns in the incoming informati...
Preprint
Although deep neural networks (DNNs) have demonstrated impressive results during the last decade, they remain highly specialized tools, which are trained -- often from scratch -- to solve each particular task. The human brain, in contrast, significantly re-uses existing capacities when learning to solve new tasks. In the current study we explore a...
Preprint
Current machine learning techniques proposed to automatically discover a robot kinematics usually rely on a priori information about the robot's structure, sensors properties or end-effector position. This paper proposes a method to estimate a certain aspect of the forward kinematics model with no such information. An internal representation of the...
Article
Full-text available
The first “object” that newborn children play with is their own body. This activity allows them to autonomously form a sensorimotor map of their own body and a repertoire of actions supporting future cognitive and motor development. Here we propose the theoretical hypothesis, operationalized as a computational model, that this acquisition of body k...
Preprint
In line with the sensorimotor contingency theory, we investigate the problem of the perception of space from a fundamental sensorimotor perspective. Despite its pervasive nature in our perception of the world, the origin of the concept of space remains largely mysterious. For example in the context of artificial perception, this issue is usually ci...
Article
Full-text available
In line with the sensorimotor contingency theory, we investigate the problem of the perception of space from a fundamental sensorimotor perspective. Despite its pervasive nature in our perception of the world, the origin of the concept of space remains largely mysterious. For example in the context of artificial perception, this issue is usually ci...
Data
Audio and tactile psychometric functions fitted to the data of the 10 subjects. For the audio graphs, each data point corresponds to 15 measurements. For the tactile graph (top, middle), each data point corresponds to 15 measurements. The means μ of each function are taken to be the PSE for that subject for that condition, and σ indicates the slope...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this article is to track the fetal origin of infants’ sensorimotor behavior. We consider development as the self-organizing emergence of complex forms from spontaneously generated activity, governed by the innate capacity to detect and memorize the consequences of spontaneous activity (contingencies), and constrained by the sensory and m...
Article
Full-text available
This study focuses on how the body schema develops during the first months of life, by investigating infants’ motor responses to localized vibrotactile stimulation on their limbs. Vibrotactile stimulation was provided by small buzzers that were attached to the infants’ four limbs one at a time. Four age groups were compared cross‐sectionally (3‐, 4...
Article
Full-text available
In this work we propose a system for visual question answering. Our architecture is composed of two parts, the first part creates the logical knowledge base given the image. The second part evaluates questions against the knowledge base. Differently from previous work, the knowledge base is represented using hyper-dimensional computing. This choice...
Article
Full-text available
In the present work we propose a Deep Feed Forward network architecture which can be trained according to a sequential learning paradigm, where tasks of increasing difficulty are learned sequentially, yet avoiding catastrophic forgetting. The proposed architecture can re-use the features learned on previous tasks in a new task when the old tasks an...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we present an alternative strategy for fine-tuning the parameters of a network. We named the technique Gradual Tuning. Once trained on a first task, the network is fine-tuned on a second task by modifying a progressively larger set of the network's parameters. We test Gradual Tuning on different transfer learning tasks, using networks...
Article
Full-text available
Tactile speech aids, though extensively studied in the 1980s and 90s, never became a commercial success. A hypothesis to explain this failure might be that it is difficult to obtain true perceptual integration of a tactile signal with information from auditory speech: exploitation of tactile cues from a tactile aid might require cognitive effort an...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We have been observing how infants between 3 and 21 months react when a vibrotactile stimulation (a buzzer) is applied to different parts of their bodies. Responses included in particular movement of the stimulated body part and successful reaching for and removal of the buzzer. Overall, there is a pronounced developmental progression from general...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates systematic individual differences in the way observers perceive different kinds of surface properties and their relationship to the dress, which shows striking individual differences in colour perception. We tested whether these individual differences have a common source, namely differences in perceptual strategies accordin...
Article
Full-text available
The sensorimotor approach to cognition states, that the key to bring semantics to the world of a robot, requires making the robot learn the relation between the actions that the robot performs and the change it experiences in its sensed data because of those actions. Those relations are called sensorimotor contingencies (SMCs). This special issue p...
Article
Full-text available
Scientific Reports 7 : Article number: 42197 10.1038/srep42197 ; published online: 14 February 2017 ; updated: 23 March 2017 This Article contains an error in the Acknowledgements section: “Matthieu Raoelsion” should read: “Matthieu Raoelison”
Article
Full-text available
Millions of Internet users around the world challenged science by asking why a certain photo of a dress led different observers to have surprisingly different judgments about the color of the dress. The reason this particular photo produces so diverse a variety of judgments presumably is that the photo allows a variety of interpretations about the...
Article
Full-text available
Bio-mimetic approaches to restoring sensory function show great promise in that they rapidly produce perceptual experience, but have the disadvantage of being invasive. In contrast, sensory substitution approaches are non-invasive, but may lead to cognitive rather than perceptual experience. Here we introduce a new non-invasive approach that leads...
Article
Full-text available
Color constancy is the ability to recognize the color of an object (or more generally of a surface) under different illuminations. Without color constancy, surface color as a perceptual attribute would not be meaningful in the visual environment, where illumination changes all the time. Nevertheless, it is not obvious how color constancy is possibl...
Conference Paper
Philipona & O’Regan (2006) [1] recently proposed a linear model of surface reflectance as it is sensed by the human eyes. In their model, the tristimulus response to reflected light is accurately approximated by a linear transformation of the tristimulus response to illumination, allowing the prediction of several perceptual characteristics of huma...
Book
Full-text available
Cognitive science is experiencing a pragmatic turn away from the traditional representation-centered framework toward a view that focuses on understanding cognition as “enactive.” This enactive view holds that cognition does not produce models of the world but rather subserves action as it is grounded in sensorimotor skills. In this volume, experts...
Article
The problem of understanding how physical processes in the brain could give rise to consciousness has been identified with the `comparative explanatory gap', the problem of explaining why different experiences have the differing qualities they do, and the 'absolute explanatory gap', the problem of explaining why anything can be conscious at all. Th...
Chapter
Full-text available
The action-oriented approach in cognitive science emphasizes the role of action in shaping, or constituting, perception, cognition, and consciousness. This chapter summarizes a week-long discussion on how the action-oriented approach changes our understanding of consciousness and the structure of experience, combining the viewpoints of philosophers...
Article
Full-text available
The question of the nature of space around us has occupied thinkers since the dawn of humanity, with scientists and philosophers today implicitly assuming that space is something that exists objectively. Here we show that this does not have to be the case: the notion of space could emerge when biological organisms seek an economic representation of...
Article
Full-text available
Observational learning is probably one of the most powerful factors determining progress during child development. When learning a new skill, infants rely on their own exploration; but they also frequently benefit from an adult’s verbal support or from demonstration by an adult modeling the action. At what age and under what conditions does adult d...
Chapter
Erik Myin, Inez Myin-Germeys, and Kevin O’Regan explain that according to the sensorimotor approach to perception, perceptual experience should be seen as a way of interacting with the environment. What distinguishes different perceptual experiences is the different ways in which a perceiver perceptually engages with the environment. What different...
Article
The sensorimotor theory of perceptual consciousness offers a form of enactivism in that it stresses patterns of interaction instead of any alleged internal representations of the environment. But how does it relate to forms of enactivism stressing the continuity between life and mind (and more particularly autopoiesis, autonomy, and valence) We sha...
Article
When do infants start to understand that they can grasp an object by its handle when the interesting part is out of reach? Whereas it is known from preferential looking tasks that already at three months of age infants show surprise when all parts of an object do not move together, little is known about when infants are able to use such knowledge i...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Although deep neural networks (DNNs) have demonstrated impressive results during the last decade, they remain highly specialized tools, which are trained – often from scratch – to solve each particular task. The human brain, in contrast, significantly re-uses existing capacities when learning to solve new tasks. In the current study we explore a bl...
Article
We investigated how repeated, five-minute familiarization sessions occurring once a week over a 6-week period influenced infants’ knowledge about the functional properties of a rake-like tool and their ability to use it for retrieving an out of reach object by 16 months of age. We found that infants, who were not allowed to touch the rake, but only...
Article
Traditionally, the “Imagery Debate” has opposed two main camps: depictivism and descriptivism. This debate has essentially focused on the nature of the internal representations thought to be involved in imagery, without addressing at all the question of action. More recently, a third, “embodied” view is moving the debate into a new phase. The embod...
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between the sensory signal of the photoreceptors on one hand and color appearance and language on the other hand is completely unclear. A recent finding established a surprisingly accurate correlation between focal colors, unique hues, and so-called singularities in the laws governing how sensory signals for different surfaces chan...
Article
Full-text available
Many studies have shown that making children laugh enhances certain cognitive capacities such as attention, motivation, perception and/or memory, which in turn enhance learning. However, no study thus far has investigated whether laughing has an effect on learning earlier in infancy. The goal of this study was to see whether using humour with young...
Article
The design of robotic systems is largely dictated by our purely human intuition about how we perceive the world. This intuition has been proven incorrect with regard to a number of critical issues, such as visual change blindness. In order to develop truly autonomous robots, we must step away from this intuition and let robotic agents develop their...
Article
Humans are extremely swift learners. We are able to grasp highly abstract notions, whether they come from art perception or pure mathematics. Current machine learning techniques demonstrate astonishing results in extracting patterns in information. Yet the abstract notions we possess are more than just statistical patterns in the incoming informati...
Article
The aim of the present study was to understand what factors influence infants' problem-solving behaviours on the multiple-string task. The main question focused on why infants usually solve the single string-pulling task at 12months at the latest, whereas most 16-month-old infants still cannot solve the task when several strings are presented, only...
Article
Full-text available
We describe the results of a longitudinal study on five infants from age 12 to 20 months, presented with an out of reach toy and a rake-like tool within reach. Five conditions of spatial relationship between toy and rake were tested. Outcomes and types of behavior were analyzed. There were successes observed around 12 months in the condition of spa...
Article
Abstract Mastery of sensorimotor contingencies can be viewed as attunement to potentialities. In our view, these potentialities have wider application than recognized in Seth's account of sensory presence, and should pertain to all of sensory experience. Instead of appealing only to a notion of counterfactual richness, we propose that the degree of...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The relationship between the sensory signal of the photoreceptors and the language of color is completely unclear. A recent finding established a surprisingly accurate correlation between color terms and so-called singularities in the laws governing how sensory signals for different surfaces change across illuminations. The sensory signal depends o...
Article
The sensorimotor theory considers experience to be a thing we do, claiming that experiencing, say, redness, consists in currently exercising mastery of a sensorimotor engagement with something red. Under this view, the quality of a particular experience is constituted by those laws that govern the interaction underlying that experience. We emphasiz...
Chapter
This paper starts by providing a succinct overview of the sensorimotor approach to phenomenal consciousness, describing its two parts: the part that concerns the quality of sensations, and the part that concerns whether or not such qualities are (consciously) experienced. The paper goes on to discuss the explanatory status of the approach, claiming...
Article
In this study, we investigated whether hand preference influences infants' choice of what hand to use in grasping a new tool presented at the midline, and whether this will change in the course of learning the functionality of a tool. The tool was a rake within reach placed beside an out-of-reach toy presented either to its right or to its left. Fo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Current machine learning techniques proposed to automatically discover a robot's kinematics usually rely on a priori information about the robot's structure, sensor properties or end-effector position. This paper proposes a method to estimate a certain aspect of the forward kinematics model with no such information. An internal representation of th...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the fact that the rubber hand illusion (RHI) is an experimental paradigm that has been widely used in the last 14 years to investigate different aspects of the sense of bodily self, very few studies have sought to investigate the subjective nature of the experience that the RHI evokes. The present study investigates the phenomenology of the...
Article
The question of the nature of space around us has occupied thinkers since the dawn of humanity, with scientists and philosophers today implicitly assuming that space is something that exists objectively. Here we show that this does not have to be the case: the notion of space could emerge when biological organisms seek an economic representation of...
Article
Full-text available
Despite a growing interest in the question of tool-use development in infants, no study so far has systematically investigated how learning to use a tool to retrieve an out-of-reach object progresses with age. This was the first aim of this study, in which 60 infants, aged 14, 16, 18, 20, and 22months, were presented with an attractive toy and a ra...