J. P. Lawrence

J. P. Lawrence
Michigan State University | MSU · Lyman Briggs College

M.S., Ph.D.

About

15
Publications
2,166
Reads
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73
Citations
Citations since 2017
15 Research Items
73 Citations
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201720182019202020212022202305101520
201720182019202020212022202305101520
Introduction
J. P. Lawrence currently works in Lyman Briggs College at Michigan State University. J.P. does research in Genetics, Evolutionary Biology and Ecology. Their current project involves understanding how selection allows for polymorphism in aposematic species
Additional affiliations
August 2012 - June 2018
University of Mississippi
Position
  • Genetics TA
Description
  • I teach genetics labs which have three main sections: Mendelian inheritance, molecular genetics, and population genetics.
Education
August 2011 - May 2018
University of Mississippi
Field of study
  • Biology
August 2008 - May 2011
Michigan State University
Field of study
  • Fisheries and Wildlife
August 2003 - December 2006
Michigan State University
Field of study
  • Zoology

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Full-text available
After decades of near‐complete extirpation, the yellow‐and‐black‐striped Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) is being reintroduced into field enclosures that exclude all but avian predators. The frog's long absence means avian attack risk to reintroduced individuals is unknown, so we asked: does corroboree frog coloration make them v...
Article
Full-text available
Aposematic organisms couple conspicuous warning signals with a secondary defense to deter predators from attacking. Novel signals of aposematic prey are expected to be selected against due to positive frequency-dependent selection. How, then, can novel phenotypes persist after they arise, and why do so many aposematic species exhibit intrapopulatio...
Article
Full-text available
Differential responses to forest edges among populations of Oophaga pumilio (Anura: Dendrobatidae) from Panama. As habitat fragmentation increasingly becomes a prevalent feature in tropical systems, investigating how such novel features affect the distribution of species is of vital importance for understanding species' ecology and conservation con...
Article
Full-text available
Mimicry, the resemblance of one species by another, is a complex phenomenon where the mimic (Batesian mimicry) or the model and the mimic (Mullerian mimicry) gain an advantage from this phenotypic convergence. Despite the expectation that mimics should closely resemble their models, many mimetic species appear to be poor mimics. This is particularl...
Article
Full-text available
Anti-predator signaling is highly variable with numerous examples of species employing cryptic coloration to avoid detection or conspicuous coloration (often coupled with a secondary defense) to ensure detection and recollection. While the ends of this spectrum are clear in their function, how species use intermediate signals is less clear. Austral...
Data
Different Pseudophryne species showing variability in dorsal coloration and conservativism of body shape. A) P. semimarmorata, B) P. guentheri, C) P. dendyi, D) P. australis, and E) our clay model. (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
A few colors, such as red and yellow, are commonly found in aposematic (warning) signaling across taxa, independent of evolutionary relationships. These colors have unique traits (i.e., hue, brightness) that aid in their differentiation, and perhaps, their effectiveness in promoting avoidance learning. This repeated use calls into question the infl...
Data
Raw data for color measurements. (ZIP)
Data
Raw data for learning trials. (XLSX)
Article
Full-text available
Call surveys offer a valuable method to monitor anuran populations attributable to their temporal breeding habits and close association with water. Many temperate locations have adopted citizen science programs to monitor local anuran populations using call surveys and road transects. These surveys, however, are not commonly conducted in the tropic...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Working on Adelpha and Heliconius to understand color vision and gene expression.