J.-E. Tremblay

J.-E. Tremblay
Laval University | ULAVAL · Department of Biology

PhD biology

About

184
Publications
81,403
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
6,892
Citations
Citations since 2017
63 Research Items
3491 Citations
20172018201920202021202220230200400600
20172018201920202021202220230200400600
20172018201920202021202220230200400600
20172018201920202021202220230200400600
Additional affiliations
November 2004 - present
Laval University
Position
  • Professor
January 1998 - October 2004
McGill University
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (184)
Preprint
Diatoms, the major eukaryotic phytoplankton in polar regions, are essential to sustain Arctic and Antarctic ecosystems. As such, it is fundamental to understand the physiological mechanisms and associated molecular basis of their resilience to the long polar night. Here, we report an integrative approach revealing that in prolonged darkness, diatom...
Article
Full-text available
The seasonal and spatial variability of surface phytoplankton assemblages and associated environmental niches regarding major nutrients, physical (temperature and salinity), and optical characteristics (inherent and apparent optical properties) were investigated in an anthropized subarctic coastal bay, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence: the Bay of Sept-Î...
Article
Full-text available
The transition from ice-covered to open water is a recurring feature of the Arctic and sub-Arctic, but microbial diversity and cascading effects on the microbial food webs is poorly known. Here, we investigated microbial eukaryote, bacterial and archaeal communities in Hudson Bay (sub-Arctic, Canada) under sea-ice cover and open waters conditions....
Article
Full-text available
A recent study hypothesized that the near-zero temperatures that generally prevail in Arctic waters negate the influence that different nitrogen (N) sources can otherwise have on the growth and elemental stoichiometry of marine micro-algae. Here we test this hypothesis experimentally by evaluating how temperature (0–9°C) affects the growth and elem...
Article
Full-text available
The Hudson Bay complex (HBC) is home to numerous indigenous communities that traditionally have relied heavily on its marine resources. The nutritional quality and stocks of the entire HBC food web depend in large part on the phytoplankton production of bioactive molecules (long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and carotenoids) and their transfer...
Article
Full-text available
Pulses of ocean primary productivity during the fall season are frequent in the mid-latitudes when ocean cooling and wind-driven turbulence erode the surface stratification and allow the injection of nutrients into the euphotic zone. This phenomenon is often referred to as a phytoplankton fall bloom, and can play an essential role in the survival o...
Preprint
Full-text available
Climate warming and related drivers of soil thermal change in the Arctic are expected to modify the distribution and dynamics of carbon contained in perennially frozen grounds. Thawing of permafrost in the Mackenzie Delta region of northwestern Canada, coupled with increases in river discharge and coastal erosion, trigger the release of terrestrial...
Article
Full-text available
In the Arctic, sea ice loss has already transformed the dominant sources and periodicity of primary production in some areas, raising concerns over climate change impacts on benthic communities. Considered to be excellent indicators of environmental changes, benthic invertebrates play important roles in nutrient cycling, sediment oxygenation and de...
Article
Full-text available
Ports play a central role in our society, but they entail potential environmental risks and stressors that may cause detrimental impacts to both neighboring natural ecosystems and human health. Port managers face multiple challenges to mitigate risks and avoid ecosystem impacts and should recognize that ports are embedded in the wider regional coas...
Article
Full-text available
1. Diatoms of the Arctic Ocean annually experience extreme changes of light environment linked to photoperiodic cycles and seasonal variations of the snow and sea‐ice cover extent and thickness which attenuate light penetration in the water column. Arctic diatom communities exploit this complex seasonal dynamic through a well‐documented species suc...
Data
Bottles or small containers/Aquaria (<20 L); Brackish waters; Community composition and diversity; Entire community; Laboratory experiment; North Atlantic; Other metabolic rates; Pelagos; Primary production/Photosynthesis; Temperate
Article
Full-text available
The St. Lawrence Estuary connects the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. The accepted view, based on summer conditions, is that the estuary's surface layer receives its nutrient supply from vertical mixing processes. This mixing is caused by the estuarine circulation and tides interacting with the topography at the head of the Laurentian Channel....
Preprint
Full-text available
The St. Lawrence Estuary connects the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. The accepted view, based on summer conditions, is that the Estuary's surface layer receives its nutrient supply from vertical mixing processes. This mixing is caused by the estuarine circulation and tidal-upwelling at the Head of the Laurentian Channel (HLC). During winter w...
Article
Full-text available
Pertinent environmental factors influencing the microalgal bloom during sea-ice breakup in Hudson Bay were investigated in June 2018, producing the first observations of late spring primary production in the offshore waters of this vast inland sea. Phytoplankton production was found to commence at the onset of ice melt, with surface nutrient deplet...
Article
Full-text available
The MALINA oceanographic campaign was conducted during summer 2009 to investigate the carbon stocks and the processes controlling the carbon fluxes in the Mackenzie River estuary and the Beaufort Sea. During the campaign, an extensive suite of physical, chemical and biological variables were measured across seven shelf–basin transects (south–north)...
Article
Full-text available
One of the most striking ecological divides on Earth is between marine and nearby freshwater environments, as relatively few taxa can move between the two. Microbial eukaryotes contribute to biogeochemical and energy cycling in both fresh and marine waters, with little species overlap between the two ecosystems. Arctic and sub-Arctic marine systems...
Article
Full-text available
The objective of this study was to assess experimentally the potential impact of anthropogenic pH perturbation (ApHP) on concentrations of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), as well as processes governing the microbial cycling of sulfur compounds. A summer planktonic community from surface waters of the Lower St. Lawrence...
Article
Full-text available
The Hudson Bay System (HBS), the world’s largest inland sea, has experienced disproportionate atmospheric warming and sea-ice decline relative to the whole Arctic Ocean during the last few decades. The establishment of almost continuous positive atmospheric air temperature anomalies since the late 1990s impacted its primary productivity and, conseq...
Poster
Full-text available
Hudson Bay has so far received little attention during the spring peak of microalgal growth, although it holds 10% of the seasonal ice cover found in the Arctic Ocean and provides a habitat for large populations of migratory birds and marine mammals. Furthermore, Hudson Bay is expected to undergo rapid changes in the timing and distribution of the...
Article
Full-text available
Measurements of net community production (NCP) provide an upper constraint on the strength of the oceanic biological pump, the dominant mechanism for removing CO2 from the ocean surface and sequestering it at depth. In this investigation, our objectives were to describe the spatial and temporal variability of NCP associated with the spring ice-edge...
Preprint
The aim of this work was to determine the impact of sympagic (ice-associated) algal primary production on the quality of Arctic filter-feeding bivalves. For this purpose, we investigated the sea ice production of lipids (including omega−3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) and highly branched isoprenoids (HBI)), as well as their subsequent inco...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this work was to determine the impact of sympagic (ice-associated) algal primary production on the quality of Arctic filter-feeding bivalves. For this purpose, we investigated the sea ice production of lipids (including omega−3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n- 3 PUFA) and highly branched isoprenoids (HBI)), as well as their subsequent inc...
Article
Full-text available
The MALINA oceanographic campaign was conducted during summer 2009 to investigate the carbon stocks and the processes controlling the carbon Fluxes in the Mackenzie River estuary and the Beaufort Sea. During the campaign, an extensive suite of physical, chemical and biological variables was measured across seven shelf–basin transects (south-north)...
Article
Full-text available
Arctic Ocean primary productivity is limited by light and inorganic nutrients. With sea ice cover declining in recent decades, nitrate limitation has been speculated to become more prominent. Although much has been learned about nitrate supply from general patterns of ocean circulation and water column stability, a quantitative analysis requires de...
Article
Full-text available
Arctic sea ice is retreating and thinning and its rate of decline has steepened in the last decades. While phytoplankton blooms are known to seasonally propagate along the ice edge as it recedes from spring to summer, the substitution of thick multiyear ice (MYI) with thinner, ponded first-year ice (FYI) represents an unequal exchange when consider...
Poster
Full-text available
Recent advances in Earth Observation technologies are promising in bring traditional ocean-color capabilities to coastal zones. However, the biogeochemical and optical complexity that are usually found in such environments commonly hinders the retrieval of geophysical variables using generic inversion algorithms. This is particularly critical for p...
Article
Full-text available
In the wake of modest surface blooms that occur at the onset of the growth season in the nitrogen-poor surface waters of the Beaufort Sea, subsurface chlorophyll maxima (SCM) develop and persist within the nutrient-rich halocline. Algal communities of these SCM can realize a major portion of annual net primary production and are often dominated by...
Article
Full-text available
Baffin Bay, located at the Arctic Ocean’s ‘doorstep’, is a heterogeneous environment where a warm and salty eastern current flows northwards in the opposite direction of a cold and relatively fresh Arctic current flowing along the west coast of the bay. This circulation affects the physical and biogeochemical environment on both sides of the bay. T...
Article
Full-text available
The Arctic Ocean is particularly affected by climate change, with changes in sea ice cover expected to impact phytoplankton primary production. During the Green Edge expedition, the development of the late spring–early summer diatom bloom was studied in relation with the sea ice retreat by multiple transects across the marginal ice zone. Biogenic s...
Article
Full-text available
The Arctic Ocean is particularly affected by climate change, with changes in sea ice cover expected to impact phytoplankton primary production. During the Green Edge expedition, the development of the late spring–early summer diatom bloom was studied in relation with the sea ice retreat by multiple transects across the marginal ice zone. Biogenic s...
Preprint
Full-text available
Arctic sea ice is retreating, thinning and its rate of decline has steepened in the last decades. While phytoplankton blooms are known to seasonally propagate along the ice edge as it recedes from spring to summer, the substitution of thick multi-year ice (MYI) with thinner, ponded first-year ice (FYI) represents an unequal exchange when considerin...
Article
Full-text available
The Arctic Ocean is particularly affected by climate change, with changes in sea ice cover expected to impact phytoplankton primary production. During the Green Edge expedition, the development of the late spring–early summer diatom bloom was studied in relation with the sea ice retreat by multiple transects across the marginal ice zone. Biogenic s...
Article
Full-text available
The Arctic ice scape is composed by a mosaic of ridges, hummocks, melt ponds, leads, and snow. Under such heterogeneous surfaces, drifting phytoplankton communities are experiencing a wide range of irradiance conditions and intensities that cannot be sampled representatively using single‐location measurements. Combining experimentally derived photo...
Article
Full-text available
Nares Strait is the northern most outflow gateway of the Arctic Ocean, with a direct connection to the remaining multi-year ice covered central Arctic Ocean. Nares Strait itself flows into the historically highly productive North Water Polynya (Pikialasorsuaq). Satellite data show that Nares Strait ice is retreating earlier in the season. The early...
Article
Full-text available
During summer, phytoplankton can bloom in the Arctic Ocean, both in open water and under ice, often strongly linked to the retreating ice edge. There, the surface ocean responds to steep lateral gradients in ice melt, mixing, and light input, shaping the Arctic ecosystem in unique ways not found in other regions of the world ocean. In 2016, we samp...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter describes physical and chemical changes in the oceans surrounding Canada on decadal and longer time scales, and discusses these changes in the context of anthropogenic climate change and natural climate variability.
Article
Microbes drive most ecosystems and are modulated by viruses that impact their lifespan, gene flow and metabolic outputs. However, ecosystem-level impacts of viral community diversity remains difficult to assess due to classification issues and few reference genomes. Here we establish a ~12-fold expanded global ocean DNA virome dataset of 195,728 vi...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of ocean acidification and warming on the concentrations of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) were investigated during a mesocosm experiment in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE) in the fall of 2014. Twelve mesocosms covering a range of pHT (pH on the total hydrogen ion concentration scale) from 8.0 to 7.2,...
Chapter
Full-text available
Arctic marine ecosystems provide numerous benefits and services of economic, societal and ecological value, including the provision of food resources, the conservation of biodiversity, carbon storage and nutrient recycling, among others. The Arc3Bio project combines the multidisciplinary skills of several experts to evaluate how climate variability...
Chapter
Full-text available
Arctic marine ecosystems provide numerous benefits and services of economic, societal and ecological value, including the provision of food resources, the conservation of biodiversity, carbon storage and nutrient recycling, among others. The Arc3Bio project combines the multidisciplinary skills of several experts to evaluate how climate variability...
Chapter
Full-text available
The marine ecosystem of the Eastern Canadian Arctic is shaped by a combination of remote and regional processes that affect freshwater loading, nutrient supply and ratios, acidification, and ice dynamics. Remote drivers include the inflow of waters from the Pacific Ocean and rivers, as well as their transformations in transit toward eastern Baffin...
Chapter
Full-text available
Living, harvestable resources in the upper Arctic Ocean ultimately depend on the production of marine microalgae. Microalgal production also mitigates global warming by fixing the greenhouse gas CO2 into biomass, of which a portion sinks to the seafloor. This process, called the ‘biological CO2 pump’, supplies food to the benthic organisms living a...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of ocean acidification and warming on the concentrations of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) were investigated during a mesocosm experiment in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE) in the fall of 2014. Twelve mesocosms covering a range of pHT (pH on the total hydrogen ion concentration scale) from 8.0 to 7.2,...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the combined effect of ocean acidification and warming on the dynamics of the phytoplankton fall bloom in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE), Canada. Twelve 2600L mesocosms were set to initially cover a wide range of pHT (pH on the total proton scale) from 8.0 to 7.2 corresponding to a range of pCO2 from 440 to 2900µatm, and two...
Article
Nitrogen is a limiting nutrient for primary production in the western Arctic Ocean. Measurements of the nitrogen (¹⁵N/¹⁴N) and oxygen (¹⁸O/¹⁶O) isotope ratios of nitrate in the southeastern Beaufort Sea provide insight into biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen in the western Arctic Ocean. Nitrate O isotope ratios in the Pacific halocline evidence a h...
Article
Full-text available
Oceanic gateways are sensitive to climate driven processes. By connecting oceans, they have a global influence on marine biological production and biogeochemical cycles. The furthest north of these gateways is Nares Strait at the top of the North Water between Greenland and Ellesmere Island (Canada). This gateway is globally beneficial, first by su...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the combined effect of ocean acidification and warming on the dynamics of the phytoplankton fall bloom in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE), Canada. Twelve 2600 L mesocosms were set to initially cover a wide range of pHT (pH on the total proton scale) from 8.0 to 7.2 corresponding to a range of pCO2 from 440 to 2900 µatm, and tw...
Article
Full-text available
The rapid physical changes affecting the Arctic Ocean alter the growth conditions of primary producers. In this context, a crucial question is whether these changes will affect the composition of phytoplankton communities, augment their productivity, and eventually enhance food webs. We combined satellite and model products with in situ datasets co...
Article
Full-text available
The source strength and capability of aerosol particles in the Arctic to act as cloud condensation nuclei have important implications for understanding the indirect aerosol–cloud effect within the polar climate system. It has been shown in several Arctic regions that ultrafine particle (UFP) formation and growth is a key contributor to aerosol numb...
Article
Full-text available
The head of the Laurentian Channel is a very dynamic region of exceptional biological richness. To evaluate the impact of freshwater discharge, tidal mixing, and biological activity on the pH of surface waters in this region, a suite of physical and chemical variables was measured throughout the water column over two tidal cycles. The relative cont...