Iván Prieto

Iván Prieto
Universidad de León | UNILEON · Department of Biodiversity and Environment Management

PhD

About

64
Publications
35,479
Reads
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2,411
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 2021 - present
Universidad de León
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
January 2015 - March 2021
Spanish National Research Council
Position
  • PostDoc Position
April 2014 - December 2014
Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (64)
Article
The least‐cost economic theory of photosynthesis shows that water and nitrogen are mutually substitutable resources to achieve a given carbon gain. However, vegetation in the Sahel has to cope with the dual challenge imposed by drought and nutrient‐poor soils. We addressed how variation in leaf nitrogen per area (Narea) modulates leaf oxygen and ca...
Article
Full-text available
The aboveground impacts of climate change receive extensive research attention, but climate change could also alter belowground processes such as the delicate balance between free-living fungal decomposers and nutrient-scavenging mycorrhizal fungi that can inhibit decomposition through a mechanism called the Gadgil effect. We investigated how clima...
Article
Full-text available
Extensive research efforts are devoted to understand fine root trait variation and to confirm the existence of a belowground root economics spectrum (RES) from acquisitive to conservative root strategies that is analogous to the leaf economics spectrum (LES). The economics spectrum implies a trade-off between maximizing resource acquisition and pro...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of plants on the biosphere, atmosphere, and geosphere are key determinants of terrestrial ecosystem functioning. However, despite substantial progress made regarding plant belowground components, we are still only beginning to explore the complex relationships between root traits and functions. Drawing on literature in plant physiology,...
Article
Full-text available
Eight years of studying coffee ecophysiology and monitoring ecosystem services (ES) in a large coffee farm in Costa Rica revealed several practical recommendations for farmers and policy makers. The cropping system studied within our collaborative observatory (Coffee-Flux) corresponds to a coffee-based agroforestry system (AFS) under the shade of l...
Article
Full-text available
The aboveground impacts of climate change receive extensive research attention, but climate change could also alter belowground processes such as the delicate balance between free-living fungal decomposers and nutrient scavenging ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) that can inhibit decomposition through a mechanism called the Gadgil effect. We investigated...
Article
Full-text available
Aims Harsh edaphic environments harbor species with different soil affinities. Plant’s responses to specific edaphic constraints may be compromised against responses to prevalent stresses shared with other semi-arid environments. We expect that species with high edaphic affinity may show traits to overcome harsh soil properties, while species with...
Article
Warming‐induced desiccation of the fertile topsoil layer could lead to decreased nutrient diffusion, mobility, mineralization and uptake by roots. Increased vertical decoupling between nutrients in topsoil and water availability in subsoil/bedrock layers under warming could thereby reduce cumulative nutrient uptake over the growing season. We used...
Article
Full-text available
1. Many studies have quantified the functional variation of fine root traits to understand the overarching trade-off between maximizing resource acquisition or conservation (root economics spectrum -RES-). However, we know remarkably less on how plant strategies along the RES are actually constrained by the amount of photosynthates required to cons...
Article
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Aims In the face of problems caused by ‘intensive agriculture’ dominated by large areas of monocultures, mixed intercropping mimicking natural ecosystems has been reported to constitute a viable solution to increase and stabilize productivity. When designing such systems, root niche separation was thought to be a prerequisite to optimize production...
Article
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Motivation and aim Soil biodiversity is central to ecosystem function and services. It represents most of terrestrial biodiversity and at least a quarter of all biodiversity on Earth. Yet, research into broad, generalizable spatial and temporal patterns of soil biota has been limited compared to aboveground systems due to complexities of the soil s...
Preprint
Full-text available
Quantifying the functional variation of fine root traits and their interactions with symbiotic organisms is an uprising research topic to understand the overarching trade-off between maximizing resource acquisition or conservation (root economics spectrum -RES-). The currency of root traits economy is based on the carbon required to construct them;...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Root systems show a tremendous diversity both between and within species, suggesting a large variability in plant functioning and effects on ecosystem properties and processes. In recent decades, developments in many areas of root research have brought considerable advances in our understanding of root traits and their contribution to plant and eco...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aimsSpatial heterogeneity in soil can influence the distribution of plant communities because plants differ in their ability to acquire resources. In nutrient-poor soils, plants should bear traits that prioritize conservation of resources over growth, whereas the opposite is expected in nutrient-rich soils. A coordinated response to...
Article
Nutrient resorption is the process whereby plants recover nutrients from senescing leaves and reallocate them to storage structures or newer tissues. Elemental resorption of foliar N and P has been shown to respond to temperature and precipitation but we know remarkably little about the influence of warming and drought on the resorption of these an...
Article
Climate change will increase heat and drought stress in many dryland areas, which could reduce soil nutrient availability for plants and aggravate nutrient limitation of primary productivity. Any negative impacts of climate change on foliar nutrient contents would be expected to negatively affect the photosynthetic capacity, water use efficiency an...
Article
1.Leaf litter decomposition is a key component of global biogeochemical cycles that influences soil carbon storage, nutrient availability and plant productivity. Ongoing climate change will lead to warmer and drier conditions in many dryland regions, potentially affecting litter decomposition and nutrient dynamics. Climate change effects can be dir...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims Leaf litter decomposition is an important process controlling nutrient cycling in most terrestrial ecosystems. We evaluated the relationships among traits of green leaves and decomposition rates of leaf litter (k) at different environmental scales and organisational levels (species and community). We also assessed the relationsh...
Article
Resource availability for plants in dry ecosystems is largely controlled by the occurrence of irregular rainfall pulses, which means that they must be able to rapidly take up water and nutrients during the narrow windows of opportunity following rainfall when resources become available. Epiphytic plant communities in Mediterranean climates provide...
Article
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Aims Our aim was to determine the effect of soil characteristics and root traits on soil aggregate stability at an inter- and intra-site scale in a range of agro-ecosystems. We also evaluated the effect of soil depth and the type of land use on aggregate stability. Methods Soil aggregate stability, soil physicochemical properties and fine root tra...
Article
The leaf economics spectrum (LES) describes covariation of traits relevant to carbon and nutrient economics across plant species, but much less is known about the relationship between the LES and leaf water economy. We propose an approach combining the measurement of two leaf traits related to water use economy, leaf carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O)...
Article
The influence of vegetation on slope stability is well understood at the slope level but scaling up to the catchment level is still a challenge, partially because of a lack of suitable data to validate models. We tested the physical landslide model, LAPSUS_LS, which models slope stability at the catchment scale. LAPSUS_LS combines a hydrological mo...
Article
Full-text available
Warmer and drier conditions associated with ongoing climate change will increase abiotic stress for plants and mycorrhizal fungi in drylands world-wide, thereby potentially reducing vegetation cover and productivity and increasing the risk of land degradation and desertification. Rhizosphere-microbial interactions and feedbacks are critical process...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Eight years of monitoring ecophysiology and ecosystem services (ES) in a large coffee farm of Costa Rica yields a range of practical applications for the farmer and stakeholders, thanks to numerous scientific actors and disciplines contributing to our collaborative observatory (Coffee-Flux). • A lot of ecosystem services depend on the soil properti...
Article
Full-text available
Aims In most ecosystems, plant roots from different species decompose in mixtures and in the presence of living roots; however much root decomposition research has focused on how roots of individual species or artificial mixtures decompose in the absence of living plants. We thus examined two poorly studied components of root litter decomposition:...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Warmer and drier conditions associated with climate change could reduce vegetation productivity and cover in Mediterranean-type drylands, thus increasing the risk of land degradation and desertification. We conducted a four-year manipulative study in a semiarid shrubland to assess the effects of experimental warming and rainfall reduction on the pe...
Article
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Current ecological theory can provide insight into the causes and impacts of plant domestication. However, just how domestication has impacted intraspecifi c genetic variability (ITV) is unknown. We used 50 ecotypes and 35 cultivars from fi ve grassland species to explore how selection drives functional trait coordination and...
Article
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Background and aims Interplant transfer of hydraulically redistributed water (HRW) can take place via mycorrhizal hyphal networks linking the roots of neighboring plants. We conducted a mesocosm experiment to evaluate the influence of reduced extraradical hyphal lengths on interplant HRW transfer. Methods Ectomycorrhizal Pinus halepensis saplings a...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims: In Costa Rica, coffee (Coffea arabica) plants are often grown in agroforests. However, it is not known if shade-inducing trees reduce coffee plant biomass through root competition, and hence alter overall net primary productivity (NPP). We estimated biomass and NPP at the stand level, taking into account deep roots and the pos...
Article
Full-text available
Shrubs have positive (facilitation) and negative (competition) effects on understory plants, the net interaction effect being modulated by abiotic conditions. Overall shrubs influence to great extent the structure of plant communities where they have significant presence. Interactions in a plant community are quite diverse but little is known about...
Article
Full-text available
1.Root quality is one of the main drivers of fine root decomposition, an important process controlling soil carbon (C) and nutrient cycling in most terrestrial ecosystems. Root quality is defined by chemical and morphological traits, which differ across species and thus communities. This trait variation is assumed to follow a trade-off between reso...
Article
Shrubs have both positive (facilitation) and negative (competition) effects on understory plants, the net interaction effect being modulated by abiotic conditions. Overall shrubs influence to great extent the structure of plant communities where they have significant presence. Interactions in a plant community are quite diverse but little is known...
Article
Full-text available
Background and Aims Fine roots play a major role in the global carbon cycle through respiration, exudation and decomposition processes, but their dynamics are poorly understood. Current estimates of root dynamics have principally been observed in shallow soil horizons (<1 m), and mainly in forest systems. We studied walnut (Juglans regia × nigra L....
Article
Full-text available
Climate change-induced rainfall reductions in Mediterranean forests negatively affect the decomposition of plant litter through decreased soil moisture. However, the indirect effects of reduced precipitation on litter decomposition through changes in litter quality and soil microbial communities are poorly studied. This is especially the case for f...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Integrar las comunidades del suelo en la teoría ecológica general es uno de los desafíos actuales de la Ecología Terrestre. Las comunidades de organismos del suelo son responsables de la descomposición y el reciclado de nutrientes, procesos esenciales para el funcionamiento de los ecosistemas terrestres y los ciclos biogeoquímicos a escala global....
Article
The nature of the relationship between water limitation and facilitation has been one of the most contentious debates surrounding the stress-gradient hypothesis (SGH), which states that plant-plant interactions shift from competition to facilitation with increasing environmental stress. We take a closer look at the potential role of soil moisture i...
Article
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Plant species diversity regulates the productivity1, 2, 3 and stability2,4 of natural ecosystems, along with their resilience to disturbance5,6. The influence of species diversity on the productivity of agronomic systems is less clear7, 8, 9, 10. Plant genetic diversity is also suspected to influence ecosystem function3,11, 12, 13, 14, although emp...
Article
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Background and aims Characterising the spatial distribution of tree fine roots (diameter ≤ 2 mm) is fundamental for a better understanding of belowground functioning when trees are grown with associated crops in agroforestry systems. Our aim was to compare fine root distributions and orientations in trees grown in an alley cropping agroforestry st...
Article
There is a fundamental trade-off between leaf traits associated with either resource acquisition or resource conservation. This gradient of trait variation, called the economics spectrum, also applies to fine roots, but whether it is consistent for coarse roots or at the plant community level remains untested. We measured a set of morphological and...
Article
Full-text available
1.There is a fundamental trade-off between leaf traits associated with either resource acquisition or resource conservation. This gradient of trait variation, called the economics spectrum also applies to fine roots but whether it is consistent for coarse roots or at the plant community level remains untested.2.We measured a set of morphological an...
Article
Full-text available
In arid systems, most plant mortality occurs during long drought periods when water is not available for plant uptake. In these systems, plants often benefit from scarce rain events occurring during drought but some of the mechanisms underlying this water use remain unknown. In this context, plant water use and redistribution after a large rain eve...
Article
1) Facilitation is known as the positive effect of one species (benefactor) on associated neighbouring species (beneficiaries). Although the beneficial part of this interaction has received considerable research interest, there is a gap of knowledge on the bidirectional nature of these interactions; in particular, the physiological and fitness cons...
Article
Full-text available
Shrubs of the Great Basin desert in Utah are subjected to a prolonged summer drought with the potential consequence of reduced water transport capability of the xylem due to drought-induced cavitation. Hydraulic redistribution (HR) is the passive movement of water from deep to shallow soil through plant roots. Hydraulic redistribution can increase...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Unraveling belowground processes, especially root-soil interactions whereby plants acquire water and nutrients, remains one of the greatest challenges in plant ecology. Stable isotopic composition of xylem water and leaf tissues coupled with soil and different water sources provide valuable insights on fundamental plant processes such as plant wate...
Article
1. Environmental gradients may influence a plant’s physiological status and morphology, which in turn may affect plant–plant interactions. However, little is known about the relationship between environmental variation, physiological and morphological variability of plants and variation in the balance between competition and facilitation. 2. Mounta...
Article
Hydraulic lift (HL) - the passive movement of water through plant roots from deep wet to shallow drier soil layers - can improve root survival in dry soils by providing a source of moisture to shallow roots. It may also enhance plant nutrient capture, though empirical evidence for this is scarce and whether HL promotes the selective placement of ro...
Article
Background and aims We conducted a mesocosm study to investigate the extent to which the process of hydraulic redistribution of soil water by plant roots is affected by mycorrhizosphere disturbance. Methods We used deuterium-labeled water to track the transfer of hydraulically lifted water (HLW) from well-hydrated donor oaks (Quercus agrifolia Nee....
Article
Hydraulic redistribution (HR) is the passive movement of water between different soil parts via plant root systems, driven by water potential gradients in the soil-plant interface. New data suggest that HR is a heterogeneous and patchy process. In this review we examine the main biophysical and environmental factors controlling HR and its main impl...
Article
Hydraulic lift (HL) has been shown to improve performance of species occurring next to a plant engaged in HL, but whether this process plays an important role in seedling survival and growth in arid environments remains largely unknown. Here, we tested the influence of HL on the interaction between Retama sphaerocarpa, a nurse lifter shrub from wes...
Article
Full-text available
Hydraulic lift (HL) is the process by which plants can passively transfer water from deep, moist soil layers to shallow, dry soil layers. Although it has attracted recent research interest, a mechanistic understanding and its implications for ecosystem functioning are still lacking. Here we describe HL seasonal patterns in a semi-arid shrub species...
Article
Full-text available
Hydraulic lift (HL) is the passive movement of water through the roots from deep wet to dry shallow soil layers when stomata are closed. HL has been shown in different ecosystems and species, and it depends on plant physiology and soil properties. In this study we explored HL patterns in several arid land shrubs, and developed a simple model to sim...

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