Ivan Milosavljević

Ivan Milosavljević
University of California, Riverside | UCR · Department of Entomology

PhD

About

58
Publications
10,131
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
440
Citations
Introduction
I am a Supervisory Project Scientist in biological control at the University of California Riverside. I work on the biological control an IPM of invasive pest species that attack agricultural crops, threaten wilderness areas, and degrade urban landscapes in California. As an Affiliate for the Center for Invasive Species Research I am regularly engaged in emerging programs concerning invasive pests such as for e.g., Argentine ants, Asian citrus psyllid, California red scale, and palm weevils.
Additional affiliations
May 2020 - present
University of California, Riverside
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Invasive species management
September 2016 - May 2020
University of California, Riverside
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Invasive species management
August 2015 - September 2016
Washington State University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
January 2012 - August 2015
Washington State University
Field of study
  • Entomology

Publications

Publications (58)
Article
Full-text available
Insect pests often exhibit predictable seasonal population dynamics in response to temperature and other environmental drivers. Understanding these dynamics is critical to developing effective integrated pest management strategies. Here we studied the seasonal phenology and feeding activity of two wireworm species that are major pests of wheat crop...
Article
Characterizing the composition of pest communities across variable cropping landscapes is critical for developing integrated management programs due to variation across species in their ecology and impacts on crops. Wireworms, the soil-dwelling larvae of click beetles, have resurged as major pests of cereal crops in the Pacific Northwestern United...
Article
Full-text available
Across many ecosystems, increases in species biodiversity generally results in greater resource acquisition by consumers. Few studies examining the impacts of consumer diversity on resource capture have focused on terrestrial herbivores, however, especially taxa that feed belowground. Here we conducted field mesocosm experiments to examine the effe...
Article
Full-text available
In California, Asian citrus psyllid vectors the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, which causes the lethal citrus disease huanglongbing. The top priority for California's citrus industry has been to diminish the rate of bacterium spread by reducing Asian citrus psyllid populations in urban areas, where this pest primarily resides. Attempt...
Article
Full-text available
Urban areas landscaped with ornamental palms, especially Canary Islands date palms (Phoenix canariensis), are particularly vulnerable to incursion by invasive palm weevils, Rhynchophorus spp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Metropolitan palmscapes are often resource rich in terms of palm species diversity and density, and these areas typically have nu...
Chapter
Full-text available
Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae: Diaphorinini), is an invasive pest of citrus in California, United States. Diaphorina citri was first detected in California in 2008 and presents a significant threat to the long-term viability of the California citrus industry because of its ability to vector a phloem-limited bacterium,...
Article
Full-text available
Heilipus lauri Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a specialist pest of avocado fruit and is considered an incursion risk for U.S. avocado producers. At the time work reported here was undertaken the flight capabilities of H. lauri were unknown. Consequently, proactive studies were undertaken to quantify aspects of this pest's flight capabilitie...
Article
Full-text available
Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) was first released in California for biological control of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) in December 2014. The establishment and parasitism rates of D. aligarhensis, along with those of another introduced species, Tamarixia radiata (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), first released in 2011, wer...
Preprint
Full-text available
Agricultural diversification often promotes biodiversity and ecosystem services by increasing habitat diversity. However, responses to agricultural diversification are context dependent, differentially impacting functional groups of service-providing organisms and crop yields. Conservation and no tillage are promoted as agricultural diversification...
Article
No-till agriculture, combined with the practices of continuous soil cover by retaining crop residues and of crop rotation, including cover crops, represents a relatively widely adopted management system that aims to increase soil organic matter content as well as long-term sustainability. However, its impacts on wireworm populations in the soil and...
Article
Bird damage to maize crops is an important cause of economic loss for maize growers in Italy. Consequently, the objectives of this study were to identify main species of birds attacking maize in north-eastern Italy and quantify the effects of agronomic characteristics, cultivation practices, landscape variables, and management practices on the inci...
Article
The effects of climate, and ants on population regulation of an invasive citrus pest, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae), by its parasitoid Tamarixia radiata (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), in southern California were examined over a four-year period. Densities of D. citri eggs, nymphs, and adults, and Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Hymenoptera:...
Article
Full-text available
The life time flight capabilities of an invasive palm pest, Rhynchophorus palmarum, were assessed using flight mill assays under controlled conditions in the laboratory. A total of 101 weevils were used for experiments and subjected to repeat flight assays. A total of 17 flight trials were run, of which the first 14 provided useful data prior to we...
Article
The efficacies of two trap types, bucket and Picusan traps, for capturing and retaining Rhynchophorus palmarum (L.), an invasive palm pest responsible for killing thousands of ornamental Canary Islands date palms (Phoenix canariensis Chabaud [Arecales: Arecaceae]) in San Diego County, CA, were compared. Digital video data were analyzed to determine...
Article
Rhynchophorus palmarum (L.) is an invasive pest responsible for killing thousands of ornamental Canary Islands date palms (Phoenix canariensis Chabaud) in San Diego County, CA. Two field experiments were conducted to compare the attractiveness of six different baits and two trap types. The tested baits were dates + water; dates + water + Saccharomy...
Article
The palm weevil, Rhynchophorus palmarum (L.), was first recorded in San Diego County, CA in 2011 and breeding populations were recovered from infested Canary Islands date palms, Phoenix canariensis, in San Ysidro, San Diego County, in 2015. This palm pest presents a significant threat to California’s edible date industry as Phoenix dactylifera is a...
Article
Full-text available
We present a synthetic review and expert consultation that assesses the actual risks posed by arthropod pests in four major crops, identifies targets for integrated pest management (IPM) in terms of cultivated land needing pest control and gauges the implementation “readiness” of non-chemical alternatives. Our assessment focuses on the world’s prim...
Article
Greater natural enemy diversity generally increases prey mortality. Diversity can be beneficial when natural enemy species occupy distinct niches (complementarity effects) or when diverse communities contain the most impactful species by chance (identity effects). Most research assessing effects of natural enemy diversity focuses on aboveground pre...
Article
The effects of six average daily temperatures, 15, 20, 25, 30, 32, and 35°C, that were either constant or fluctuating over 24 h on development times of California-sourced Diaphorina citri Kuwayama nymphs were examined. Thermal performance curves for immature stages of D. citri were characterized using one linear and six nonlinear models (i.e., Ratk...
Article
Full-text available
The temperature-driven development rates and longevity times of Psyllaphycus diaphorinae Hayat (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), a hyperaparasitoid of Tamarixia radiata (Waterston) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) and Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis (Shafee, Alam & Agarwal) (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), 2 primary parasitoids of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri K...
Chapter
Scientific advances in classical biological control and supporting disciplines have provided ‘tools’ that could enable permanent suppression of some seemingly intractable invasive pest problems that limit the effectiveness of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programmess in perennial crops. This chapter examines the steps required in the development...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the effects of seven constant and fluctuating temperature profiles with corresponding averages of 12 to 38°C on the life history of the Punjab, Pakistan-sourced Tamarixia radiata (Waterston) released in California for biological control of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama. One linear and seven nonlinear regression functions were fit to...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of fluctuating and constant temperatures on the development and longevity of Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis (Shafee, Alam, and Argarwal) (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), a parasitoid sourced from Pakistan and released in California for the classical biological control of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), were examined. The influe...
Article
Full-text available
Modeling can be used to characterize the effects of environmental drivers and biotic factors on the phenology of arthropod pests. From a biological control perspective, population dynamics models may provide insights as to when the most vulnerable pest life stages are available for natural enemies to attack. Analyses presented here used temperature...
Article
Full-text available
The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) –‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CLas) complex associated with huanglongbing (HLB) has become an increasingly prevalent and serious threat to California citrus producers. ACP-CLas threatens both backyard, and more importantly, commercial citrus groves. Decisive actions were made in 2011 and 2014 with the release...
Article
Full-text available
The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP)-'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (CLas) complex associated with huanglongbing (HLB) has become an increasingly prevalent and serious threat to California citrus producers. ACP-CLas threatens both backyard, and more importantly, commercial citrus groves. Decisive actions were made in 2011 and 2014 with the release o...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction: Characterizing pest status of organisms across variable cropping landscapes is critical for developing integrated management strategies due to variation in species’ ecology and crop impacts. Wireworms, soil-dwelling larvae of click beetles, have resurged as problematic pests of cereal crops in the Pacific Northwestern United States. Y...
Article
Full-text available
Wireworms, which have become a major pest for wheat and barley farmers in the Pacific Northwest since the elimination of Lindane 10 years ago, continue to cause production issues throughout the dryland region east of the Cascades. The larval offspring of various species of click beetles, wireworms are also causing headaches in legumes, potatoes, an...
Article
Full-text available
Wireworms, the immature stage of the click beetle, are a major best of Pacific Northwest cereal crops. The insect feeds on plants below the surface, causing wilt, stunted growth, or death to young crops. This fact sheet provides descriptions and photographs to assist in the identification of wireworms found in the Northwest.
Article
Full-text available
Soil-dwelling insects are severe pests in many agroecosystems. These pests have cryptic life cycles, making sampling difficult and damage hard to anticipate. The management of soil insects is therefore often based on preventative insecticides applied at planting or cultural practices. Wireworms, the subterranean larvae of click beetles (Coleoptera:...
Conference Paper
Wireworms, the larval stage of click beetles (Coleoptera: Elateridae), are re-emerging as significant soil-dwelling insect pests of a wide variety of field crops in North America and globally. Wireworms are generalist herbivores that feed on crop roots, seeds, and stems, resulting in increased weed pressure and reduced stands, yields, and profits....
Conference Paper
Soil-dwelling insect pests pose special problems in many agricultural ecosystems. They often have cryptic life cycles, making their sampling difficult and damage hard to anticipate. Their management is therefore often based on preventative insecticides applied at planting or cultural practices. Wireworms, the subterranean larvae of click beetles ha...
Conference Paper
Soil-dwelling insect pests pose special problems in many agro-ecosystems. They often have cryptic life cycles, making sampling difficult and damage hard to anticipate. Their management is therefore often based on preventative insecticides applied at planting or cultural practices. Wireworms, the subterranean larvae of click beetles have re-emerged...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
In one of our studies I want to explore: (1) whether the insecticides (pooled across all available types [N=2] and rates [N=3]; fixed factors) impacted yield parameters compared to untreated checks and, (2) whether variation in the type of insecticide and the rate impacted yields.
I want to use hierarchical partitioning methods to evaluate variance contributions of different predictors within a generalized linear mixed model framework (location and year are random). The data come from Poisson distribution.
Can I apply two separate models to partition the joint variation within the full set of treatments and control into two components: one for accounting the variation between the control and average treatment effect (model 1), and the other accounting for variation within the set of treatments (model 2), and thus increase the significance of comparisons?
This could not be achieved with only one model as it would lack statistical power to answer both of our questions, correct?
Or a single model for each response per crop would be more appropriate (incorporating effect of dose and type, for example with a control treatment of rate = 0 and type= one of the insecticide types)?
Any thoughts?
Thanks!
-Ivan
Question
What are the potential effects of on interactions between nonvectors and vectors on the spread of plant pathogens in managed and natural ecosystems?
Previous studies have shown that different herbivore and plant pathogen species elicit different hormone responses in plants.
Mediated by plant defenses, could herbivores and plant pathogens interact to affect the spread of the disease across landscapes?
Any thoughts?

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Argentine ant (AA) has formed mutualisms with sap sucking pests (SSP's) in citrus, including Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), the vector of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) that causes the lethal citrus disease huanglongbing (HLB). HLB is not in commercial citrus. Ants protect >85% of SSP's and >55% of ACP from natural enemies (NE’s) and are rewarded with honeydew. AA exacerbates pest infestations. Sprays for AA and SSP’s kill NE’s, cause secondary pest outbreaks, and increase resistance. Biocontrol of ACP and SSP's can be synergized through three management practices: (1) monitoring AA activity with infra-red sensors, (2) controlling AA with biodegradable hydrogel beads infused with 25% sucrose water and ultra low amount of insecticide, and (3) floral resources that provide food to natural enemies that attack SSP's. We propose to evaluate the impacts of orchard-wide management of AA with sensors, hydrogel beads, and floral resources on biocontrol of ACP and SSP's in citrus orchards.
Project
An integrated management approach for South American palm weevil, an invasive pest of ornamental palms in Southern California
Project
In California, Asian citrus psyllid vectors the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, which causes the lethal citrus disease huanglongbing. The top priority for California's citrus industry has been to diminish the rate of bacterium spread by reducing Asian citrus psyllid populations in urban areas, where this pest primarily resides. Attempts at eradicating and containing the psyllid with insecticides were unsuccessful. An alternative approach has been a classical biological control program using two parasitoids from Pakistan, Tamarixia radiata and Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis, which attack the psyllid nymphs. T. radiata has established widely and, in combination with generalist predators, natural enemies are providing substantial control of psyllids in urban areas.