İsmail Hakkı Tekiner

İsmail Hakkı Tekiner
Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University | ISZU · Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Doctor of Engineering

About

14
Publications
798
Reads
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39
Citations
Citations since 2017
14 Research Items
39 Citations
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Introduction
Dr. İsmail Hakkı Tekiner originally from Turkey received his B.Sc. degree in chemical engineering from Middle East Technical University. After graduation, he worked for Turkish and multinational companies as project engineer, process supervisor, and module leader. In 2016, he successfully finished his doctoral study in food engineering. Dr. Tekiner currently works as a full-time academic in İstanbul Sabahattin Zaim University. His major interest areas are food safety and security, nutrition, foo

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
Sekanjabin , also known as Oxymel , is an ancient beverage including honey, fermented vinegar, water, and various fruits and herbs. Great physicians Hippocrates, Galen, and Avicenna recommended treating gastrointestinal disorders, pain, asthma, thoracic, cough, sore throat, foul, and breath. Furthermore, Maulana, a symbol of tolerance that is human...
Article
Penicillium roqueforti from native food habitats can provide more insights into moldy cheese production. The objective of this study was to evaluate the starter culture potential of wild P. roqueforti strains from moldy cheese samples of artisanal origin. Their starter culture potential was studied after culturing, morphological analysis, and PCR-i...
Article
In this study, we evaluated food stabilizing potential of nisin Z produced by wild Lactococcus (Lc.) lactis subsp. lactis from a total of 114 raw milk and naturally fermented products. After microbiological cultivation of lactic acid bacteria, Lc. lactis subsp. lactis strains identified by mass spectrometry were screened for the nisin Z gene by PCR...
Article
This study aimed to investigate the changes in volatile composition and amino acid profile of a dish “duck breast, beetroot mille-feuille” prepared in the Turkey Gala Dinner of an international gastronomy association. The ingredients collected from bazaars and chain markets were prepared and processed according to the original recipe. In raw ingred...
Article
Turkish cuisine is one of the richest in the world with its strong historical and intercultural background. Contrary to the common perception, Turkish food culture is not all meat-centric; it has an incredibly rich diversity of vegan choices. Traditional Turkish cuisine also extends to ceremonial and traditional occasions, such as weddings, burial...
Article
Hygiene is essential in foodservices to prevent food safety and public health issues. Implementation of food safety legislation represents a sine qua non obligation of the foodservice business. In this study, we aimed to monitor the foodservice business risks associated with poor hygiene quality in the catering establishments for consumer protectio...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Aroma and taste are phenomena that give different experiences to human physiology every day. From point of gastronomic view, a dish containing flavor and taste molecules in definite proportions is considered to be well balanced. Examining organic compounds responsible for flavor and taste can open up new horizons fort he chefs in preparing deliciou...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Oxymel is a beverage prepared by mixing honey, vinegar and water in certain proportions. The drink known as oxymel(asid and honey) in western languages, as for Turkish the name of sirkencubin came from Farsi serke(vinegar) and angabin(honey). As well as important nutrition for people date back the birth of civilization, honey and vinegar used in th...
Article
Full-text available
Fermentation using Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) and LAB species can exhibit extracellular activities such as decreasing of antinutritional factors, in particular phytic acid (PA) or phytate. The objective of this study was to assess extracellular phytase activities of LAB in sourdough mix prepared from traditionally produced boza as starter culture....
Article
Full-text available
This study aims to assess the probiotic properties of Lactic Acid Bacteria isolated from the traditional sourdoughs used for bread making in Turkey. A total number of 29 samples from twelve provinces of Turkey were collected, and screened for the presence of lactic acid bacteria using microbiological methods. The microbiological screening yielded 1...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Food choices impact human and planetary health. The negative environmental impacts of the food system, increasing food insecurity and the prevalence of unhealthy diets are driving policymakers, scientists, companies and consumers to demand sustainable solutions. Globally, livestock emits 14.5% of GHGs, causes 30% of biodiversity loss, and meat demand is projected to double by 2050. Transitioning diets to more sustainable sources of protein is crucial. Plant-based proteins are currently the fastest growing food trend but are dependent on soy. The IPSUS project will exploit opportunities for extracting upcycled plant and seaweed proteins from raw materials otherwise destined to join the ~1.6 billion tonnes of annual global food loss and waste (FLW). Six protein-rich sources (pumpkin, hazelnut, grape, potato, brewers' spent grain, seaweeds) were selected for study across partner countries (UK, Italy, Romania, Turkey, Morocco). The quantity, quality and upcycling opportunities of FLW along these value chains will be investigated. Novel protein extraction methods will be tested to identify less energy-intensive and more affordable techniques. The related nutritional quality and safety of the plant and seaweed sources and upcycled proteins will be assessed, taking bio-accessibility and potential allergenicity into account. Initially, incorporation of upcycled FLW proteins into meat alternative and cheese alternative formulations will be at lab-scale, followed by prototype development at pilot-scale by the industrial partners. Functional and sensory acceptability of the prototypes will be compared to the existing products, additionally targeting improved nutritional (low salt, sugar, fat) and cleaner label (less chemical additives) offerings currently lacking in the plant-based meat and cheese alternatives. Exploration of consumer behaviours, preferences and the enabling regulatory and policy environment will reveal drivers and barriers of the sustainable upcycled plant-based protein shift.