Ismael Al-Amoudi

Ismael Al-Amoudi
Grenoble École de Management | GEM · Department of People, Organization and Society

PhD (Cambridge 2007), MA (Lancaster 1999), Diplôme ESCP Europe (Paris 2000)

About

37
Publications
46,140
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
418
Citations
Citations since 2017
16 Research Items
275 Citations
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
Introduction
I am interested in social theory and critical management studies. I study social phenomena of significance for human flourishing. My analysis usually combines ethnographic exploration, ontological questioning and ethical discussion. Recent projects include: - empirical studies on normativity, relationality and violence. - socio-philosophical reflections on Late Modernity and intensified social change. - socio-philosophical reflections on post-human society, incl. artificial intelligence.
Additional affiliations
September 2018 - present
Grenoble École de Management
Position
  • Professor (Full)
September 2013 - September 2018
Cardiff University
Position
  • Professor (Full)
August 2006 - November 2013
University of Reading
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Education
September 2002 - June 2006
University of Cambridge
Field of study
  • Management Studies
September 1996 - July 2000
ESCP Business School
Field of study
  • Management - major in Finance

Publications

Publications (37)
Chapter
Full-text available
How does intensified morphogenesis affect our ability to interpret codified rules? This paper examines the effects of social and systemic integration on the interpretation of codified rules in morphogenic times. When mophogenesis predominates, we witness both a fragmentation of deep social integration and an extension of minimal social integration...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter discusses the import of philosophical discussions of ontology for organisational studies. It analyses the ontological presuppositions of positivism that still permeate much of sociology and organisational studies. These ontological presuppositions are then discussed from philosophical perspectives that propose or presuppose different o...
Article
Full-text available
This paper investigates a puzzling feature of social conventions: the fact that they are both arbitrary and normative. We examine how this tension is addressed in sociological accounts of conventional phenomena. Traditional approaches tend to generate either synchronic accounts that fail to consider the arbitrariness of conventions, or diachronic a...
Article
Full-text available
This paper re-examines the import of Rawls’s theory of justice for private sector institutions in the face of the decline of the welfare state. The argument is based on a Rawlsian conception of justice as the establishment of a basic structure of society that guarantees a fair distribution of primary goods. We propose that the decline of the welfar...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines the alleged organization of violence by Coca-Cola through a field study conducted in a village in India. It draws on the works of Judith Butler to show how subaltern groups are derealized and made into ungrievable lives through specific, yet recurrent, practices that keep violence unchecked. Many participants attempt to resist d...
Article
This study of domestic workers and employers examines the significance of workplace humiliation as an important yet neglected concept for organization studies. It identifies practices of symbolic, sexual, and physical workplace humiliation that shape corporeality and subjectivity in such a way that workers feel inferior, fearful, and docile. Practi...
Article
Full-text available
Post-human technologies, such as human enhancements and artificial intelligence, blur or displace the boundaries of our common humanity. While these technologies enhance many valuable human powers, there is limited philosophical discussion as to whether and how they can also be dehumanizing? To answer this question, I start from a philosophical dis...
Chapter
Full-text available
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter, we offer a content analysis of top-tier management journals to examine the extent to which advocates of neuroscience in management pay heed to the ethical ramifications of their work. Based upon our analysis, we are able to robustly refute the claim by Butler and colleagues (Hum Relat 70:1171–1190, 2017) that Lindebaum’s (Hum Relat...
Book
Full-text available
When the Matrix trilogy was published in the mid-1980s, it introduced to mass culture a number of post-human tropes about the conscious machines that have haunted our collective imaginaries ever since. This volume explores the social representations and significance of technological developments – especially artificial intelligence and human enhanc...
Article
Full-text available
How is collective remembering inhibited by organizational changes which were not intended to manipulate it? And how does collective forgetting affect workers’ power and sense of identity? We rely on an ethnographic study of a charitable organization that went through recent organizational changes to study two processes constitutive of collective fo...
Article
Full-text available
This short paper reviews Harari's best-selling Homo Deus. It provides a summary, a friendly critique, and a short discussion of how this book may inspire future studies of management and organization.
Article
Full-text available
This short piece reviews Homo Deus by Harari and discusses potential implications for organisation studies.
Book
Full-text available
This book is the first of a trilogy which investigates, from a broadly realist perspective, the place, and challenges, of the human in contemporary social orders. We examine the significance, for humanism and humanity, of living in largely morphogenic societies. Ex Machina opens with three ontological reflexions by Archer, Porpora and Donati on t...
Article
Full-text available
The Cambridge Social Ontology (CSO) programme’s inability to generate a meaningful dialogue with mainstream economics is difficult to understand by mere reference to judgmental rationality and without reference to CSO’s ideological configuration. Our paper uses an économie des conventions framework to draw systematic comparisons between CSO’s ideol...
Article
Full-text available
In this essay, we ask whether leadership development needs to care more about neuro-ethics in an era when neuroscientific interventions gain credence at work? Informed by emerging discussions amongst neuroscientists, we address two main issues. First, recent debates cast significant doubt on the validity of neurofeedback (especially neurofeedback u...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines the alleged organisation of violence by Coca Cola through a field-study conducted in a village in India. It draws on the works of Judith Butler to show how subaltern groups are derealised and made into ungrievable lives through specific, yet recurrent, practices that keep violence unchecked. Many participants attempt to resist d...
Article
Full-text available
The endangered loggerhead sea-turtle (Caretta caretta) nests on the shores of the Mediterranean, but faces threats to its existence from a variety of sources. Answering the question of how this species can survive is complex as it involves examining the relationships between the turtle, its natural environment, local tourists, property developers,...
Article
Full-text available
The endangered loggerhead sea-turtle (Caretta caretta) nests on the shores of the Mediterranean, but faces threats to its existence from a variety of sources. Answering the question of how this species can survive is complex as it involves examining the relationships between the turtle, its natural environment, local tourists, property developers,...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter examines whether, why and how fundamental powers of human reflexivity deserve fuller consideration by liberal egalitarian theories of justice. The discussion focuses on two reflexive powers. Firstly, social reflexivity which can broadly be defined as each person’s capacity to formulate, respond and act on the question: ‘how should I ma...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter lays the groundwork for a realist analysis of the disappearance or ‘death’ of social forms, which is particularly relevant in societies experiencing intensified social transformation. Whilst the notion of morphogenesis can account both for the acceleration of change and for the multiplication of coexisting social forms, it does not all...
Article
Full-text available
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter studies some of the contemporary problems created by social morphogenesis for normativity. It reflects on situations where morphogenetic mechanisms (conducive to structural transformation) dominate, without ever suppressing entirely, morphostatic ones (bringing structural stability). The questions addressed are two-folded: what are the...
Chapter
Full-text available
This paper examines how the morphogenesis of authority presupposes, and in turn constitutes, social roles and relations of obligation. Authority is conceptualised as a relation of power based on legitimacy. An analysis in terms of rights and obligations emphasises the import of identities and, in particular, social identities and social roles in th...
Article
Full-text available
The thesis of this paper is that, although the classroom is arguably a place where the contradiction between CMS and the aspirations of (would-be) managers is particularly salient and potentially conflictive, it can also be a place where some of these conflicts and contradictions can be resolved. The paper addresses the apparent paradox of critical...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this paper is to examine how the morphogenesis of authority presupposes, and in turn constitutes, social roles and relations of obligation. Authority is conceptualised as a relation of power based on legitimacy. The latter is in turn analysed both in terms of authorisation and of obligations. Such a perspective emphasises the import...
Article
Full-text available
What kind of things are social rules? The paper starts from the critique of social rules articulated by ethnomethodologists and proposes an alternative conception of rules as situated, often tacit, imperatives. This ontological theorization borrows insights from critical realism and post-structuralism to explore general features of rules. For insta...
Article
Full-text available
The paper interrogates the status, nature and significance of epistemological relativism as a key element of constructionism and critical realism. It finds that epistemological relativism is espoused by authorities in critical realism and marginalised or displaced in the field of management and organisation studies, resulting in forms of analysis t...
Article
Full-text available
I propose that Foucault‟s works, since he wrote Discipline and Punish, rely on an implicit meta-theory that is compatible with the fundamentals of Critical Realism. To this end I examine the status of truth, methodology and social ontology used by Foucault. If this thesis is correct, then a critical realist reading of Michel Foucault would avoid so...
Article
Full-text available
The article discusses the concept of rules as used in sociological studies, focusing on the categorization of types of rules and addressing an ethnomethodological debate over whether rules can be usefully distinguished from actions. An argument using retroductive reasoning is presented and an explanation of the salient features of retroduction are...
Article
Full-text available
According to standard dictionaries such as the Oxford English Dictionary, relativism is a doctrine that truth or morality is relative to situations and not absolute or universal. For example, a relativist would claim that statements such as "Peter works more than Sally" or "Peter acts badly" cannot be correct in themselves but presuppose that one a...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reflects on an 18 months experience of teaching critical management studies at the University of Reading (UK). It explores some of the paradoxes associated with critical management education (CME) and proposes practical solutions for solving them. It is proposed that, under certain conditions, CME can both achieve high student satisfacti...

Network

Cited By