Isaiah Odhiambo Nengo

Isaiah Odhiambo Nengo
Stony Brook University | Stony Brook · Turkana Basin Institute

PhD

About

35
Publications
5,405
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414
Citations
Citations since 2017
22 Research Items
184 Citations
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201720182019202020212022202301020304050

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
The morphological affinities of a primate proximal ulna (KNM-WS 65401) recovered from the late Early Miocene site Buluk, Kenya, are appraised. Nineteen three-dimensional landmarks on ulnae from 36 extant anthropoid species (n = 152 individuals) and KNM-WS 65401, as well as a subset of 14 landmarks on six ulnae belonging to other East African Miocen...
Article
Full-text available
New field observations and ⁴⁰ Ar/ ³⁹ Ar geochronology reveal that the Topernawi Formation of the Ekitale Basin, northern Turkana Depression, Turkana County, Kenya was deposited entirely during the Oligocene between 29.7 ± 0.5 Ma and 29.24 ± 0.08 Ma. These bracketing ages are determined via new ⁴⁰ Ar/ ³⁹ Ar geochronology on a basaltic lava flow at t...
Article
Early Miocene carnivorous mammals from Buluk, Kenya, are described and discussed. Four taxa belonging to Hyaenodonta and four belonging to Carnivora are identified. Members of Hyaenodonta include Hyainailouros sulzeri, Hyainailouros cf. napakensis, a third taxon about the size of Leakitherium, represented only by postcranial material, and a fourth...
Conference Paper
The assembly of Africa’s iconic C4 grassland and savanna ecosystems is central to evolutionary interpretations of many mammals, including hominins. Based largely on pollen, biomarkers, and isotopic data, C4 grasses are thought to have become ecologically dominant in Africa only after 10 Ma. However, paleobotanical records older than 10 Ma are spars...
Article
The late Early Miocene site of Buluk, Kenya, has yielded fossil remains of several catarrhine primates, including 16 dentognathic specimens of the stem cercopithecoid Noropithecus bulukensis. With the exception of the large sample of Victoriapithecus macinnesi from the middle Miocene of Maboko Island, Kenya, the majority of stem cercopithecoid taxa...
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Preprint
Full-text available
Considerable taxonomic diversity has been recognised among early Miocene catarrhines (apes, Old World monkeys, and their extinct relatives). However, locomotor diversity within this group has eluded characterization, bolstering a narrative that nearly all early catarrhines shared a primitive locomotor repertoire resembling that of the well-describe...
Article
Full-text available
Considerable taxonomic diversity has been recognised among early Miocene catarrhines (apes, Old World monkeys, and their extinct relatives). However, locomotor diversity within this group has eluded characterization, bolstering a narrative that nearly all early catarrhines shared a primitive locomotor repertoire resembling that of the well-describe...
Conference Paper
As herbivorous mammals, primates face selective pressures to maintain functional use of their permanent dentition in the face of tooth wear from attrition, abrasion, and chemical erosion. Some folivorous primates have been shown to maintain the three-dimensional (3D) length of molar shearing crests until extreme stages of wear are reached, while ot...
Article
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Conference Paper
Full-text available
The stem cercopithecoid Noropithecus bulukensis is known from 17 specimens collected at the early Miocene site Buluk, Kenya. Recent fieldwork at this site has yielded ~90 cercopithecoid fossils. Aside from the well-known middle Miocene taxon Victoriapithecus macinnesi from Maboko, Kenya, the fossil record of the Victoriapithecidae is comprised of s...
Poster
Full-text available
Presented at the American Association of Physical Anthropologists meeting in Atlanta, GA, USA in April 2016.
Article
The evolutionary history of extant hominoids (humans and apes) remains poorly understood. The African fossil record during the crucial time period, the Miocene epoch, largely comprises isolated jaws and teeth, and little is known about ape cranial evolution. Here we report on the, to our knowledge, most complete fossil ape cranium yet described, re...
Article
Songhor is an early Miocene fossil locality in Kenya known for its diverse primate assemblage that includes catarrhine species belonging to the genera Kalepithecus, Limnopithecus, Dendropithecus, Rangwa-pithecus, and Proconsul. Expeditions to Songhor since the 1930s have recovered unassociated catarrhine postcranial remains from both the fore-and h...
Article
We describe five new specimens of Hippopotamidae from the Miocene of Napudet, a new site in southwestern Turkana Basin, Kenya. These specimens include fragmentary maxillae with teeth and a well-preserved mandibular symphysis. We attribute them to Kenyapotamus ternani, the least known species within Kenyapotamus, on the basis of relatively small den...
Article
Limnopithecus is a small-bodied catarrhine genus that is widespread throughout early Miocene sites in East Africa. Although two species of this genus have been described – Limnopithecus legetet (type species) and Limnopithecus evansi – they are poorly known anatomically and their systematic positions remain unresolved. Here, we provide detailed des...
Conference Paper
Songhor is one of a group of sites located around the lower slopes of the Miocene Volcano at Tinderet in western Kenya and has produced a diverse assemblage of primate fossils dated to ~19-20 Ma. Here we provide qualitative descriptions and comparative computational analysis (PCA and CVA) of several non-cercopithecoid catarrhine capitates recovered...
Article
Two catarrhine mandibles and five isolated teeth have been discovered from Early Miocene localities in Western Kenya. One mandible comes from the well-known locality of Songhor whereas the other is from a newly discovered locality, Lower Kapurtay, located near Songhor. The mandibles both can clearly be assigned to the species Rangwapithecus gordoni...
Article
Full-text available
New early Miocene forelimb fossils have been recovered from the Songhor and Lower Kapurtay localities in southwestern Kenya. We describe four specimens that are similar in size and functional capabilities. Their specific allocation is problematic but these forelimb specimens must belong to either Rangwapithecus gordoni or Proconsul africanus. If th...
Article
Four new, nearly complete patellas of Proconsul heseloni and two of P. nyanzae have been discovered on Rusinga Island, Kenya. Until recently, little was known of the Proconsul knee joint because of the fragmentary and distorted nature of the available remains. These new patellas provide an opportunity to assess knee joint structure and function in...
Article
A partial skeleton attributed to Proconsul nyanzae (KNM-MW 13142) is described. The fossils were found at a site on Mfangano Island, Kenya, which dates to 17.9 +/- .1 million years ago. KNM-MW 13142 consists of six partial vertebrae (T12-S1), a nearly complete hipbone, most of the right femur and left femoral shaft, a fragmentary tibia and fibula,...
Article
Full-text available
Important primate fossils were collected from Songhor, an early Miocene locality in Nyanza Province, western Kenya, from the time o fits discovery in 1932 until 1972 (MacInnes, 1943; Andrews, 1981). During a brief visit to the site in 1986, Andrew Hill found a nearly complete mandible of Rangwapithecus gordoni eroding from a gully (Hill & Odhiambo,...

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