Isabelle DeSisto

Isabelle DeSisto
Princeton University | PU · Department of Politics

PhD

About

4
Publications
624
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Introduction
I am a current PhD student in Politics at Princeton University. I hold a BA in Government and MA in Regional Studies: Russia, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia from Harvard University, and an MPhil in Politics and International Studies from the University of Cambridge. My research lies at the intersection of comparative politics and international relations. My regional interests are in Eurasia and Latin America.

Publications

Publications (4)
Thesis
Full-text available
This dissertation examines foreign humanitarian aid to Belarusian and Ukrainian children after the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster. Although the scale of such aid was impressive, it was unequal: Belarusian children attracted much more attention than their Ukrainian counterparts. My research addresses the puzzle of why Belarusian "Children of Cherno...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
From the establishment of Soviet-Cuban diplomatic ties in 1960 to the collapse of the USSR in 1991, tens of thousands of Cubans studied in the Soviet Union. Educational collaboration was crucial for their relationship, and its consequences for Cuba remain significant.
Thesis
Full-text available
From 1960 to 1991, tens of thousands of Cubans studied in the Soviet Union. This thesis adds nuance to existing theories of soft power by examining Soviet-Cuban educational exchange programs at both the state-to-state and people-to-people levels. Through an analysis of archival documents, statistical records, and expert testimony, I conclude that...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
In this ongoing project, which grew out of research I conducted for MA thesis at Harvard University, I explore the dynamics of large-scale educational exchange programs organized between the Soviet and Cuban governments during the Cold War.
Project
In my dissertation, I address a particular puzzle concerning programs established to deliver medical aid to Chernobyl victims. Three post-Soviet countries were severely affected by radioactive material released from the Chernobyl power plant: Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia. Yet each country has taken a distinct foreign policy approach regarding the accident. Since gaining independence in 1991, Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia have each used medical aid programs as a tool to build bilateral relations with foreign countries. However, the magnitude of the programs and each government’s attitudes toward them have varied.