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Isabella L. K. Clegg

Isabella L. K. Clegg
Animal Welfare Expertise

PhD Ethology (Dolphin welfare), MPS Marine Mammal Science, BSc Animal Behaviour &Welfare

About

22
Publications
33,652
Reads
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413
Citations
Introduction
I am currently working on the practical applications of welfare science- I recently founded Animal Welfare Expertise, an animal behaviour and welfare consultancy for zoos, farms, NGOs and conservation projects (www.animalwelfareexpertise.com). I completed a PhD in Ethology with the title 'Developing welfare parameters for bottlenose dolphins under human care', in a collaboration between the LEEC Laboratoire d'Ethologie Expérimentale et Comparée at Université Pars 13 and Parc Astérix. I have a Masters in Marine Biology (Marine Mammal Science) and a BSc in Animal Behaviour and Welfare.

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
In order to continue its business sustainably, any industry that uses animals must largely align their ethical position with that of the general public: ‘the mainstream social ethic’. Although zoos are transitioning from entertainment venues to conservation actors, many cetacean (whale and dolphin) facilities present the animals in unnatural-lookin...
Article
Full-text available
Integrating welfare principles into conservation strategy is an emerging synthesis that encourages consideration of individual animals’ quality of life in research, policies and law. However, these principles have gained limited traction in marine compared to terrestrial animal conservation. This manuscript investigates several factors that may be...
Poster
Full-text available
Animal welfare can be assessed scientifically has recently made the transition from the farm industry to zoos and aquariums. For the past several decades the public display of captive cetaceans has led to controversy due to concerns over the animals’ well-being, but which up until recently had not been studied objectively. In the last few years suc...
Article
Full-text available
Welfare science has built its foundations on veterinary medicine and thus measures of health. Since bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) tend to mask symptoms of poor health, management in captivity would benefit from advanced understanding on the links between health and behavioural parameters, and few studies exist on the topic. In this study...
Poster
Only a few studies exist on the killer whales (Orcinus orca) of Chilean Patagonia, in stark contrast to research efforts on this species in Argentinian Patagonia, and Northern Hemisphere populations. With the aim of increasing our knowledge of South Eastern Pacific killer whales, a killer whale ID catalogue for the Golfo de Penas region was establi...
Article
Full-text available
Cognitive bias testing measures how emotional states can affect cognitive processes, often described using the “glass half-full/half-empty” paradigm. Classical or operant conditioning is used to measure responses to ambiguous cues, and it has been reported across many species and contexts that an animal’s cognitive bias can be directly linked to we...
Article
Full-text available
The welfare of a range of terrestrial animals can now be objectively estimated thanks to the well-established, but still expanding, field of welfare science. Despite continuing difficulties regarding definitions, it is generally agreed that welfare is assessed most accurately using multiple "animal-based measures"-that is, those evaluating aspects...
Article
Anticipatory behaviour describes the actions taken to prepare for an upcoming event. Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in captivity are known to display anticipatory behaviours before feeding sessions, but it is unknown whether they would anticipate non-alimentary events. Furthermore, there is no published information available for any speci...
Article
Many animals display a suite of increased vigilance and/or activity responses in relation to upcoming events, termed “anticipatory behavior.” Anticipatory behavior toward positive events has been suggested as a cross-species measure of affective state as it likely reflects the balance of the reward-sensitivity system: various studies suggest that a...
Thesis
Welfare science is now an established discipline which enables objective measurements of animal welfare to be made. Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) are a common cetacean species kept in captivity, and although questions are arising over their quality of life in this environment, very few studies have focussed on objectively measuring their...
Article
The field of welfare science and public concern for animal welfare is growing, with the focus broadening from animals on farms to those in zoos and aquariums. Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) are the most common captive cetaceans, and relevant regulatory standards are principally resource-based and regarded as minimum requirements. In this...
Chapter
Most of the species from the order Cetacea appear to possess advanced cognitive abilities and close social networks and are also likely to experience different affective states comprising of more than just basic emotions. Welfare describes a balance of positive and negative affective states experienced by an individual, and this balance is a good i...
Chapter
A recent increase in collaborative and independent studies on sea lions, seals and walruses has advanced our knowledge and interest in pinniped welfare. Nevertheless published discussions of the welfare of pinnipeds, and secondly of potential measures to assess their welfare, are, respectively, very few and non-existent. This chapter aims to make f...
Article
Animal welfare science is a burgeoning field, but research on cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises) is lacking. Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) are the most well-known and studied cetaceans, particularly in captivity, and thus are used in this review as a model for other cetacean species. Despite the public interest and need for such...
Article
Behavioral patterns are established in response to predictable environmental cues. Animals under human care frequently experience predictable, human-controlled events each day, but very few studies have questioned exactly how behavioral patterns are affected by such activities. Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) maintained for public display...
Article
Cognitive bias tests measure variation in emotional appraisal and are validated methods to evaluate animals’ affective states. However, the link between social behaviours and cognitive bias has not yet been investigated. Bottlenose dolphins are a gregarious species for whom welfare research is increasing in importance, and thus are a good model to...
Article
Full-text available
Animal welfare science is a burgeoning field, but research on cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises) is lacking. Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) are the most well-known and studied cetaceans, particularly in captivity, and thus are used in this review as a model for other cetacean species. Despite the public interest and need for such...
Article
The field of welfare science and public concern for animal welfare is growing, with the focus broadening from animals on farms to those in zoos and aquaria. Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) are the most common captive cetaceans, and relevant regulatory standards are principally resource-based and regarded as minimum requirements. In this st...
Conference Paper
The intense debate on captive cetacean welfare could benefit hugely from objective data, reducing the arguments’ subjectivity and moving us closer to improving the animals’ welfare. As the most studied and also most common cetacean species in captivity, we use bottlenose dolphins as the forerunner for marine mammal welfare discussions. A definition...

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Animal Welfare Expertise, or AWE, provides exclusive insight and understanding into animal welfare issues. The organisation was founded by Dr Isabella Clegg who discovered that while welfare science continued to progress, the transfer of knowledge into the various animal industries was lagging behind. This highlighted the unexplored and unique advantages that measuring welfare could provide for the management of wild and captive animals. AWE fills this gap by using innovative, easy-to-understand tools to evaluate the welfare of an animal population, group, or individual, while also developing management programs to assure optimal quality of life in the future. Read more at www.animalwelfareexpertise.com, and don't hesitate to get in touch with any questions.
Project
Examine different aspects of the welfare of cetaceans, including understanding the importance of sociality for the welfare of cetaceans and other marine mammals.