Isabel C Barrio

Isabel C Barrio
The Agricultural University of Iceland | LBHI · Department of Environmental Sciences

PhD

About

109
Publications
53,994
Reads
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1,561
Citations
Citations since 2017
62 Research Items
1263 Citations
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Introduction
I am a field ecologist interested in understanding how ecosystems work and how they respond to changes. Tundra ecosystems provide an excellent model system to address these questions because they are, in principle, relatively simple and they are changing fast. In these systems, herbivores play a central role and plant-herbivore interactions can have cascading effects to the whole ecosystem.
Additional affiliations
June 2018 - present
The Agricultural University of Iceland
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
August 2016 - November 2016
The Agricultural University of Iceland
Position
  • Grazing Ecology and Management
January 2015 - June 2018
University of Iceland
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
May 2007 - December 2010
September 2001 - June 2006

Publications

Publications (109)
Article
Understanding the forces shaping biodiversity patterns, particularly for groups of organisms with key functional roles, will help predict the responses of ecosystems to environmental changes. Our aim was to evaluate the relative role of different drivers in shaping the diversity patterns of vertebrate herbivores, a group of organisms exerting a str...
Article
Full-text available
Rapid warming in northern ecosystems is simultaneously influencing plants, herbivores and the interactions among them. Recent studies suggest that herbivory could buffer plant responses to environmental change, but this has only been shown for vertebrate herbivores so far. The role of invertebrate herbivory in tundra ecosystems is often overlooked,...
Article
Biodiversity conflicts arise when the interests of different stakeholders over common resources compete. Typically, the more parties involved, the more complex situations become.Resolution of biodiversity conflicts requires an understanding of the ecological, social and economic factors involved, in other words the interests and priorities of each...
Article
Full-text available
Interactions among herbivores can shape the structure of their communities and drive their dynamics. However, detecting herbivore interactions can be challenging when they are deferred in space or time. Moreover, interactions among distantly related groups of herbivores, such as vertebrates and invertebrates, are poorly understood. We investigated...
Chapter
Iceland is located just south of the Arctic Circle. Its cold climate, volcanic origin, erodible soils, and relative isolation make it very sensitive to human impact. Humans arrived in Iceland ~1,150 years ago, bringing with them their pastoral ways of life, which had large impacts on Iceland’s subarctic ecosystems. The relatively short history of h...
Article
Full-text available
Background Changes in the diversity of herbivore communities can strongly influence the functioning of northern ecosystems. Different herbivores have different impacts on ecosystems because of differences in their diets, behaviour and energy requirements. The combined effects of different herbivores can in some cases compensate each other but lead...
Article
Full-text available
Global change drivers, such as anthropogenic nutrient inputs, are increasing globally. Nutrient deposition simultaneously alters plant biodiversity, species composition and ecosystem processes like aboveground biomass production. These changes are underpinned by species extinction, colonisation and shifting relative abundance. Here, we use the Pric...
Article
Full-text available
Spatial variation in plant chemical defence towards herbivores can help us understand variation in herbivore top–down control of shrubs in the Arctic and possibly also shrub responses to global warming. Less defended, non‐resinous shrubs could be more influenced by herbivores than more defended, resinous shrubs. However, sparse field measurements l...
Article
Full-text available
Fungi are highly diverse organisms, which provide multiple ecosystem services. However, compared with charismatic animals and plants, the distribution patterns and conservation needs of fungi have been little explored. Here we used high‐resolution sequencing to assess endemicity patterns, global change vulnerability and conservation priority areas...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological models predict that the effects of mammalian herbivore exclusion on plant diversity depend on resource availability and plant exposure to ungulate grazing over evolutionary time. Using an experiment replicated in 57 grasslands on six continents, with contrasting evolutionary history of grazing, we tested how resources (mean annual precip...
Article
Full-text available
Rangeland ecosystems are changing worldwide with the abandonment of extensive pastoralism practices and greater interest for species coexistence. However, the lack of compiled data on current changes in the abundance and distribution of herbivores challenges rangeland management decisions. Here we gathered and made available for the first time the...
Presentation
Rapid environmental changes and human management can modify herbivore communities and can involve shifts in the relative abundance of domestic and wild herbivores. We know little about the consequences that such changes can have on ecosystems, especially in low productive sub-artic environment. We combined abundance time series data available for e...
Poster
Human activities and rapid environmental changes are affecting herbivore assemblages at different spatio-temporalscales in the tundra. Because herbivores are characterised by diverse needs and behaviour, changes within the assemblagecan lead to shifts in ecosystem functions. This project focuses on Iceland, where the vertebrate herbivore community...
Article
ABSTRACT. Agri-environmental measures aim at mitigating the negative impacts of modern agriculture on farmland biodiversity. For example, soil management practices can positively influence the abundance and diversity of songbirds in olive groves by enhancing habitat and food availability. However, little is known about their potential implications...
Preprint
Global change drivers such as anthropogenic nutrient inputs simultaneously alter biodiversity, species composition, and ecosystem functions such as aboveground biomass. These changes are interconnected by complex feedbacks among extinction, colonization, and shifting relative abundance. Here, we use a novel temporal application of the Price equatio...
Article
Full-text available
Research in global change ecology relies heavily on global climatic grids derived from estimates of air temperature in open areas at around 2 m above the ground. These climatic grids do not reflect conditions below vegetation canopies and near the ground surface, where critical ecosystem functions occur and most terrestrial species reside. Here, we...
Preprint
Full-text available
Fungi play pivotal roles in ecosystem functioning, but little is known about their global patterns of diversity, endemicity, vulnerability to global change drivers and conservation priority areas. We applied the high-resolution PacBio sequencing technique to identify fungi based on a long DNA marker that revealed a high proportion of hitherto unkno...
Article
Full-text available
Global warming has pronounced effects on tundra vegetation, and rising mean temperatures increase plant growth potential across the Arctic biome. Herbivores may counteract the warming impacts by reducing plant growth, but the strength of this effect may depend on prevailing regional climatic conditions. To study how ungulates interact with temperat...
Article
Full-text available
Snow is an important driver of ecosystem processes in cold biomes. Snow accumulation determines ground temperature, light conditions, and moisture availability during winter. It also affects the growing season’s start and end, and plant access to moisture and nutrients. Here, we review the current knowledge of the snow cover’s role for vegetation,...
Article
Full-text available
Snow is an important driver of ecosystem processes in cold biomes. Snow accumulation determines ground temperature, light conditions and moisture availability during winter. It also affects the growing season’s start and end, and plant access to moisture and nutrients. Here, we review the current knowledge of the snow cover’s role for vegetation, p...
Preprint
Full-text available
Global change drivers such as anthropogenic nutrient inputs simultaneously alter biodiversity, species composition, and ecosystem functions such as above ground biomass. These changes are interconnected by complex feedbacks among extinction, invasion, and shifting relative abundance. Here, we use a novel temporal application of the Price equation t...
Article
Rangeland degradation compromises the functioning of extensive natural ecosystems and threatens pastoral livelihoods worldwide. Yet, defining rangeland degradation and its underlying causes remains controversial. In this study we review rangeland studies to identify different approaches used to assess rangeland degradation in Mongolia, where the pr...
Article
Full-text available
Fungi are highly important biotic components of terrestrial ecosystems, but we still have a very limited understanding about their diversity and distribution. This data article releases a global soil fungal dataset of the Global Soil Mycobiome consortium (GSMc) to boost further research in fungal diversity, biogeography and macroecology. The datase...
Article
Full-text available
Background Herbivores modify the structure and function of tundra ecosystems. Understanding their impacts is necessary to assess the responses of these ecosystems to ongoing environmental changes. However, the effects of herbivores on plants and ecosystem structure and function vary across the Arctic. Strong spatial variation in herbivore effects i...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of altered nutrient supplies and herbivore density on species diversity vary with spatial scale, because coexistence mechanisms are scale dependent. This scale dependence may alter the shape of the species–area relationship (SAR), which can be described by changes in species richness (S) as a power function of the sample area (A): S = c...
Article
Plant damage by invertebrate herbivores and pathogens influences the dynamics of grassland ecosystems, but anthropogenic changes in nitrogen and phosphorus availability can modify these relationships. Using a globally‐distributed experiment, we describe leaf damage on 153 plant taxa from twenty‐seven grasslands worldwide, under ambient conditions a...
Article
Full-text available
Poleward shifts in species distributions are expected and frequently observed with a warming climate. In Arctic ecosystems, the strong warming trends are associated with increasing greenness and shrubification. Vertebrate herbivores have the potential to limit greening and shrub advance and expansion on the tundra, posing the question of whether ch...
Article
Loss of vegetation and soil erosion are symptoms of widespread rangeland degradation across most of the Icelandic highlands. Areas at different stages of degradation coexist as a mosaic that includes both vegetated heathlands, and exposed gravelly deserts. Revegetation efforts have included fertilizer applications and grazing exclusion to increase...
Article
Full-text available
In a rapidly warming tundra, ecosystems will undergo major environmental changes which are predicted to significantly alter below–ground processes, such as decomposition of plant litter. Making use of International Tundra Experiment sites (ITEX), established approximately two decades ago, we examined long–term impacts of warming on decomposition. W...
Preprint
Full-text available
Research in environmental science relies heavily on global climatic grids derived from estimates of air temperature at around 2 meter above ground1-3. These climatic grids however fail to reflect conditions near and below the soil surface, where critical ecosystem functions such as soil carbon storage are controlled and most biodiversity resides4-8...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding and predicting large-scale ecological responses to global environmental change requires comparative studies across geographic scales with coordinated efforts and standardized methodologies. We designed, applied and assessed standardized protocols to measure tundra herbivory at three spatial scales: plot, site (habitat), and study area...
Article
Ungulate trampling modifies soils and interlinked ecosystem functions across biomes. Until today, most research has focused on temperate ecosystems and mineral soils while trampling effects on cold and organic matter‐rich tundra soils remain largely unknown. We aimed to develop a general model of trampling effects on soil structure, biota, microcli...
Article
Climatic impacts are especially pronounced in the Arctic, which as a region is warming twice as fast as the rest of the globe. Here, we investigate how mean climatic conditions and rates of climatic change impact parasitoid insect communities in 16 localities across the Arctic. We focus on parasitoids in a widespread habitat, Dryas heathlands, and...
Article
Methane (CH 4) is a strong greenhouse gas with a global warming potential 23 times larger than that of carbon dioxide. Characterizing ecosystems as either sources or sinks for methane and their magnitudes informs on biosphere contributions to the global CH 4 budget and to warming of the atmosphere. We quantified methane fluxes for the first time in...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is a worldwide threat to biodiversity and ecosystem structure, functioning, and services. To understand the underlying drivers and mechanisms, and to predict the consequences for nature and people, we urgently need better understanding of the direction and magnitude of climate‐change impacts across the soil–plant–atmosphere continuum...
Article
Full-text available
Invertebrate herbivores depend on external temperature for growth and metabolism. Continued warming in tundra ecosystems is proposed to result in increased invertebrate herbivory. However, empirical data about how current levels of invertebrate herbivory vary across the Arctic is limited and generally restricted to a single host plant or a small gr...
Article
Communities are assembled from species that evolve or colonise a given geographic region, and persist in the face of abiotic conditions and interactions with other species. The evolutionary and colonisation histories of communities are characterised by phylogenetic diversity, while functional diversity is indicative of abiotic and biotic conditions...
Article
Full-text available
The terrestrial chapter of the Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Programme (CBMP) has the potential to bring international multi-taxon, long-term monitoring together, but detailed fundamental species information for Arctic arthropods lags far behind that for vertebrates and plants. In this paper, we demonstrate this major challenge to the CBMP by...
Article
The Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Programme (CBMP) provides an opportunity to improve our knowledge of Arctic arthropod diversity, but initial baseline studies are required to summarise the status and trends of planned target groups of species known as Focal Ecosystem Components (FECs). We begin this process by collating available data for a...
Book
Cambridge Core - Natural Resource Management, Agriculture, Horticulture and forestry - Rewilding - edited by Nathalie Pettorelli
Article
Full-text available
Understanding use of space in free ranging populations that cause damage to agriculture can help in the design of measures aimed at reducing their impact. Food availability is known to determine use of space in terrestrial vertebrates so, providing alternative food sources during a specific time period may help the management of vertebrate pests by...
Chapter
The case of Hekluskógar (meaning “Hekla woodlands”) in South Iceland examines how to transition from barren desertified land to a resilient and healthy woodland that can provide ecosystem services to the people in the area and beyond. The case provides a thorough description and background of the many components involved in the largest reforestatio...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Along with climate change, herbivory is considered a main driver of ecosystem change in terrestrial Arctic environments. Understanding how herbivory influences the resilience of Arctic ecosystems to ongoing environmental changes is essential to inform policy and guide sustainable management practices. However, many studies indicate that...
Article
Full-text available
The above mentioned article was originally scheduled for publication in the special issue on Ecology of Tundra Arthropods with guest editors Toke T. Høye . Lauren E. Culler. Erroneously, the article was published in Polar Biology, Volume 40, Issue 11, November, 2017. The publisher sincerely apologizes to the guest editors and the authors for the in...
Poster
Full-text available
The Herbivory Network (http://herbivory.biology.ualberta.ca) is an international research network that brings together scientists from Arctic and alpine regions to investigate the role of herbivores in these changing ecosystems. Plant-herbivore interactions are central to the functioning of tundra ecosystems, through their effects on biodiversity,...
Article
Full-text available
Chronic, low intensity herbivory by invertebrates, termed background herbivory, has been understudied in tundra, yet its impacts are likely to increase in a warmer Arctic. The magnitude of these changes is however hard to predict as we know little about the drivers of current levels of invertebrate herbivory in tundra. We assessed the intensity of...
Article
Land degradation and extensive soil erosion are serious environmental concerns in Iceland. Natural processes associated with a harsh climate and frequent volcanic activity have shaped Icelandic landscapes. However, following human settlement and the introduction of livestock in the 9th century the extent of soil erosion rapidly escalated. Despite i...
Article
Full-text available
Risky in the tropics It is well known that diversity increases toward the tropics. Whether this increase translates into differences in interaction rates among species, however, remains unclear. To simplify the problem, Roslin et al. tested for predation rates by using a single approach involving model caterpillars across six continents. Predator a...
Poster
Full-text available
Mountains often provide refugia for cold-adapted species during both warm and glacial periods. We described a new subspecies of tussock moth previously considered a High Arctic endemic in mountains of the southwest Yukon. We investigated several unique ecological characteristics of this new subspecies, including diet breadth, responses to experimen...
Poster
Full-text available
The priorities of the Herbivory Network (http://herbivory.biology.ualberta.ca) are to integrate study sites, methodologies and metrics used in previous work; to coordinate data collection and ensure meaningful comparisons across studies; to develop new research questions and synthesize knowledge on the role of herbivory in northern and alpine ecosy...
Article
Full-text available
In tundra ecosystems, bryophytes influence soil processes directly and indirectly through interactions with overstory shrub species. We experimentally manipulated moss cover and measured seasonal soil properties and processes under two species of deciduous shrubs with contrasting canopy structures, Salix planifolia pulchra and Betula glandulosa-nan...
Data
Experimental design. In each of 10 experimental sites, four 50 x 50 cm plots were set by pairs under two neighbouring individuals of Betula glandulosa-nana complex and Salix planifolia pulchra, and each plot in a pair was randomly assigned a moss removal/control treatment. Soil temperatures were monitored for the duration of the study using tempera...
Data
Data used in the experiment. The file "Data file S1.xlsx" contains all data used in the analyses of this work. It is divided in 6 data sheets for each of the analyses: "shub_moss" with the information about shrub heights, volume and moss cover per plot; "microhabitat" describes soil moisture (water volumetric content), PAR and moss depths for all p...
Article
Full-text available
Arctic warming is resulting in reduced snow cover and increased shrub growth, both of which have been associated with altered land surface-atmospheric feedback processes involving sensible heat flux, ground heat flux and biogeochemical cycling. Using field measurements, we show that two common Arctic shrub species (Betula glandulosa and Salix pulch...