Isaac T Westfield

Isaac T Westfield
Northeastern University | NEU · Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy

About

26
Publications
4,699
Reads
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434
Citations
Citations since 2017
12 Research Items
369 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
Additional affiliations
July 2016 - present
Northeastern University
Position
  • Post-Doctoral Researcher/Lab Manager
September 2013 - July 2016
Northeastern University
Position
  • Lab Manager/Researcher

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
Corals are globally important calcifiers that exhibit complex responses to anthropogenic warming and acidification. Although coral calcification is supported by high seawater pH, photosynthesis by the algal symbionts of zooxanthellate corals can be promoted by elevated pCO2. To investigate the mechanisms underlying corals’ complex responses to glob...
Article
Full-text available
Predator loss and climate change are hallmarks of the Anthropocene yet their interactive effects are largely unknown. Here, we show that massive calcareous reefs, built slowly by the alga Clathromorphum nereostratum over centuries to millennia, are now declining because of the emerging interplay between these two processes. Such reefs, the structur...
Article
Full-text available
Epigenetic modification, specifically DNA methylation, is one possible mechanism for intergenerational plasticity. Before inheritance of methylation patterns can be characterized, we need a better understanding of how environmental change modifies the parental epigenome. To examine the influence of experimental ocean acidification on eastern oyster...
Preprint
Full-text available
Epigenetic modification, specifically DNA methylation, is one possible mechanism for intergenerational plasticity. Before inheritance of methylation patterns can be characterized, we need a better understanding of how environmental change modifies the parental epigenome. To examine the influence of experimental ocean acidification on eastern oyster...
Article
Increasing anthropogenic carbon dioxide is predicted to cause declines in ocean pH and calcium carbonate saturation state over the coming centuries, making it potentially harder for marine calcifiers to build their shells and skeletons. One mechanism of resilience to ocean acidification is an organism's ability to regulate pH and, thus, calcium car...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic global change and local stressors are impacting coral growth and survival worldwide, altering the structure and function of coral reef ecosystems. Here, we show that skeletal extension rates of nearshore colonies of two abundant and widespread Caribbean corals (Siderastrea siderea, Pseudodiploria strigosa) declined across the Belize M...
Article
We conducted a 93-day experiment investigating the independent and combined effects of acidification (280 - 3300 matm pCO2) and warming (28C and 31C) on calcification and linear extension rates of four key Caribbean coral species (Siderastrea siderea, Pseudodiploria strigosa, Porites astreoides, Undaria tenuifolia) from inshore and offshore reefs o...
Article
A solid understanding of global oceanic change throughout Holocene time is needed to contextualize and interpret recent observations of rapid warming (Moore, 2016), ocean acidification (Popova et al., 2014; Qi et al., 2017), increasing meltwater input (Halfar et al., 2013; Notz and Stroeve, 2016) and circulation changes (Liu et al., 2017; Rahmstorf...
Preprint
Full-text available
Anthropogenic global change and local anthropogenic stressors are decreasing coral growth and survival globally, thus altering the structure and function of coral reef ecosystems. We show that skeletal extension rates of nearshore colonies of Siderastrea siderea and Pseudodiploria strigosa across the Belize Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System (MBRS) h...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The impacts of recent and future anthropogenic increases in atmospheric pCO2 causing ocean acidification and temperature on high-latitude oceans, and the marine organisms that inhabit them, are varied and poorly understood. The ecologically important crustose coralline alga Clathromorphum compactum may be particularly vulnerable to ocean acidificat...
Article
Full-text available
Atmospheric pCO2 is predicted to rise from 400 to 900 ppm by year 2100, causing seawater temperature to increase by 1–4 °C and pH to decrease by 0.1–0.3. Sixty-day experiments were conducted to investigate the independent and combined impacts of acidification (pCO2 = 424–426, 888–940 ppm-v) and warming (T = 28, 32 °C) on calcification rate and skel...
Article
Anthropogenic increase of atmospheric pCO2 since the Industrial Revolution has caused seawater pH to decrease and seawater temperatures to increase—trends that are expected to continue into the foreseeable future. Myriad experimental studies have investigated the impacts of ocean acidification and warming on marine calcifiers’ ability to build prot...
Data
Anthropogenic elevation of atmospheric CO2 is driving global-scale ocean acidification, which consequently influences calcification rates of many marine invertebrates and potentially alters their susceptibility to predation. Ocean acidification may also impair an organism's ability to process environmental and biological cues. These counteracting i...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic elevation of atmospheric CO2 is driving global-scale ocean acidification, which consequently influences calcification rates of many marine invertebrates and potentially alters their susceptibility to predation. Ocean acidification may also impair an organism's ability to process environmental and biological cues. These counteracting i...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic increases in atmospheric CO2 over this century are predicted to cause global average surface ocean pH to decline by 0.1-0.3 pH units and sea surface temperature to increase by 1-4°C. We conducted controlled laboratory experiments to investigate the impacts of CO2-induced ocean acidification (pCO2 = 324, 477, 604, 2553 µatm) and warmin...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Here, we report on experiments designed to test calcification responses in phylogenetically distant echinoid species (Eucidaris tribuloides, Echinometra lucunter) reared under various combinations of seawater temperature (21.5, 28.5 °C), pCO 2 (400, 750, 2850 μatm), Mg/Ca ratio (1.7, 5.2) and presence/absence of predators (crabs). The following tre...
Article
Full-text available
Atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO(2)) has risen from approximately 280 to 400 ppm since the Industrial Revolution, due mainly to the combustion of fossil fuels, deforestation, and cement production. It is predicted to reach as high as 900 ppm by the end of this century. Ocean acidification resulting from the release of anthropogenic CO2 has been show...
Data
Atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO2) has risen from approximately 280 to 400 ppm since the Industrial Revolution, due mainly to the combustion of fossil fuels, deforestation, and cement production. It is predicted to reach as high as 900 ppm by the end of this century. Ocean acidification resulting from the release of anthropogenic CO2 has been shown...
Article
Atmospheric CO2 has increased nearly 50% since the Industrial Revolution, due primarily to increased fossil fuel combustion, cement production, and deforestation. Although subterranean reservoirs are presently considered the most viable sink for anthropogenically liberated CO2, concerns exist over the stability of these systems and their impacts on...
Article
Motivated by the idea of converting waste carbon dioxide into usable building products, Calera Corporation has developed a multi-step process that sequesters CO2 as carbonate minerals in cementitious materials. Process inputs include dissolved divalent cations and alkalinity, both of which can be extracted from basalt. In one mode of the Calera pro...

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