Isaac Emery

Isaac Emery
Informed Sustainability Consulting

PhD

About

19
Publications
1,778
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
263
Citations
Citations since 2017
6 Research Items
152 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
Additional affiliations
March 2019 - present
Informed Sustainability Consulting
Position
  • Consultant
Description
  • https://www.informedsustainability.com/
November 2017 - October 2018
The Good Food Institute
Position
  • Researcher
August 2015 - November 2017
Air Force Institute of Technology
Position
  • Fellow
Education
August 2008 - December 2013
Purdue University
Field of study
  • Agricultural and Biological Engineering / Ecological Sciences and Engineering
August 2001 - May 2005
Whitman College
Field of study
  • Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Purpose As knowledge grows of the potentially harmful effects of chemicals in widespread use, emerging contaminants have become a major source of concern and uncertainty for public health officials and water quality managers. Perfluorinated alkyl substances, often referred to as perfluorinated compounds, have come under recent scrutiny and are pres...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
As the frequency and severity of commercial airline accidents has decreased dramatically in recent decades, the marginal benefit of new safety measures has decreased as well[1]. Meanwhile, protective equipment and practices frequently increase aircraft weight and per-trip fuel burn. This additional fuel consumption impacts not only airline operatin...
Conference Paper
This study uses the life cycle assessment framework to compare the effects on human health and the environment of drop-in biofuels produced from switchgrass and prairie cordgrass using a variety of low-input farming methods. Biofuel scenarios were developed using experimental data from South Dakota State University's Felt Farm, pretreatment and bio...
Article
Sustainability guidelines and regulations in the United States often focus exclusively on carbon or petroleum reductions. Though some of these policies have resulted in substantial progress toward their goals, the effects of these efforts on other social and environmental externalities are often ignored. In this study, we examine the life-cycle air...
Article
Land availability for growing feedstocks at scale is a crucial concern for the bioenergy industry. Feedstock production on land not well-suited to growing conventional crops, or marginal land, is often promoted as ideal although there is a poor understanding of the qualities, quantity, and distribution of marginal lands in the United States. We exa...
Chapter
One of the most frequently touted benefits of community gardens and the local food movement is the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through local low input production. Commercially grown foods, grown as monocultures on large acreage typically require large inputs of fertilizers, water and pesticides along with long transport distances a...
Chapter
Integrating farms and food-producing gardens into an urban landscape can have many benefits – not only by supplementing the food brought in from farms and feedlots worldwide, but by providing a wide range of social and environmental services. A greener city has cleaner air and water and a more moderate climate than one with more pavement. Open spac...
Article
Incremental biomass losses during the harvest and storage of energy crops decrease the effective crop yield at the biorefinery gate. These losses can affect the environmental performance of biofuels from cellulosic feedstocks by indirectly increasing agricultural inputs per unit of fuel and increasing direct emissions of pollutants during biomass d...
Article
Full-text available
Packaged samples of three bioenergy feedstocks—sweet sorghum, corn stover, and switchgrass—were stored indoors under aerobic conditions to determine the change in chemical composition, track loss of specific chemical constituents, and determine the impact of dry matter loss on saccharification yields with and without pretreatment. Biomass samples w...
Article
Little is known about the contributions of biomass feedstock storage to the net greenhouse gas emissions from cellulosic biofuels. Direct emissions of methane and nitrous oxide during decomposition in storage may contribute substantially to the global warming potential of biofuels. In this study, laboratory-scale bales of switchgrass and corn stove...
Article
Life cycle inventory models of greenhouse gas emissions from biofuel production have become tightly integrated into government mandates and other policies to encourage biofuel production. Current models do not include life cycle impacts of biomass storage or reflect current literature on emissions from soil and biomass decomposition. In this study,...
Article
Bill Greenough's work provides a framework for thinking about synaptogenesis not only as a key step in the initial wiring of neural systems according to a species typical plan (i.e., experience-expectant development), but also as a mechanism for storing information based an individual's unique experience over its lifetime (i.e., experience-dependen...
Article
Full-text available
Data from clinical studies, cell culture, and animal models implicate the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)/uPA receptor (uPAR)/plasminogen system in the development of atherosclerosis and aneurysms. However, the mechanisms through which uPA/uPAR/plasminogen stimulate these diseases are not yet defined. We used genetically modified, atheroscler...
Article
Full-text available
Data from clinical studies, cell culture, and animal models implicate the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)/uPA receptor (uPAR)/plasminogen system in the development of atherosclerosis and aneurysms. However, the mechanisms through which uPA/uPAR/plasminogen stimulate these diseases are not yet defined. We used genetically modified, atheroscler...
Article
Enhanced plasminogen activation, mediated by overexpression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), accelerates atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-null mice. However, the mechanisms through which uPA acts remain unclear. In addition, although elevated uPA expression can accelerate murine atherosclerosis, there is not yet any evidence that d...
Article
Full-text available
Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is expressed at elevated levels in atherosclerotic human arteries, primarily in macrophages. Plasminogen (Plg), the primary physiologic substrate of uPA, is present at significant levels in blood and interstitial fluid. Both uPA and Plg have activities that could affect atherosclerosis progression. Moreove...
Article
Full-text available
Ground ryegrass (Lolium perenne L., 5300 kg C ha–1, 12 g C kg–1 (soil)) and urea were applied to a grassland soil with the same dose of nitrogen (N), 500 kg N ha–1, 1.1 g N kg–1 soil, and microbial respiration responses measured in the laboratory. Microbial respiration rate in control, ryegrass- and urea-amended soil averaged 2.1 ± 0.2, 25.0 ± 1.7...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (7)
Project
I am developing a research program investigating the relative strengths and weaknesses of meat, dairy, and egg production through conventional animal agriculture and new cellular agriculture platforms. Primary areas of interest include land use, climate change emissions, and life-cycle ecotoxicity and human health impacts. More details to follow as my work with the Good Food Institute (www.gfi.org) gets under way.
Project
As the frequency and severity of commercial airline accidents has decreased dramatically in recent decades, the marginal benefit of new safety measures has decreased as well. Meanwhile, protective equipment and practices frequently increase aircraft weight and per-trip fuel burn. This additional fuel consumption impacts not only airline operating costs, but also represents a marginal increase in global climate change emissions. We present a new model for estimating climate-related impacts from marginal increases in fuel use. Using case studies of recent commercial airline regulations, we look at the potential impact of including climate-related health costs on the net benefit of these rules and examine the tradeoffs in risk between safety and climate change.