Iris Starnberger

Iris Starnberger
University of Vienna | UniWien · Department of Integrative Zoology

Mag. rer. nat. PhD

About

17
Publications
5,237
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
326
Citations
Introduction
My current research aims to investigate the function of the colorful patch found on the throats of male reed frogs (Hyperoliidae). I suggest a role in visual and/or chemical communication while a male is calling. I use a variety of methods (biochemistry, histology, spectrophotometry and behavioural experiments in the lab and in the field to investigate signal modalities and their role in intra- and intersexual communication.
Additional affiliations
October 2012 - October 2013
University of Vienna
Position
  • Basic Zoological Excursions
October 2012 - present
University of Vienna
Position
  • Biology of tropical Amphibians
March 2012 - July 2012
University of Vienna
Position
  • Biology and Ecology of Native European Fauna
Education
March 2011
University of Vienna
Field of study
  • Life Sciences - Biology - Zoology - Communication
October 2005 - February 2011
University of Vienna
Field of study
  • Biology, Zoology

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
In the majority of anuran species, acoustic signals are the dominant mode of inter- and intrasexual communication. Male calls are always accompanied by the movement of a more or less conspicuous vocal sac - A potential visual cue. Reed frogs possess a striking vocal sac with a colorful patch of gland tissue clearly visible once the vocal sac is inf...
Article
Some amphibians use chemical signals in addition to optical and acoustical signals to transmit information. Males of mantellid frogs from Madagascar and hyperoliid frogs from Africa emit complex, species‐ and sex‐specific bouquets of volatiles from their femoral or gular glands. We report here on the identification, synthesis, and determination of...
Article
Full-text available
The contents of the gular glands of the male African reed frog Hyperolius cinnamomeoventris consist of a mixture of aliphatic macrolides and sesquiterpenes. While the known macrolide gephyromantolide A was readily identified, the structure of another major component was suggested to be a tetradecen-13-olide. The synthesis of the two candidate compo...
Data
Experimental procedures, mass spectra of macrolides, alternative fragmentation pathway, enantiomer separation by GC–MS, 1H and 13C NMR spectra.
Article
Full-text available
Detour behaviour, an individual's ability to reach its goal by taking an indirect route, has been used to test spatial cognitive abilities across a variety of taxa. Although many amphibians show a strong homing ability, there is currently little evidence of amphibian spatial cognitive flexibility. We tested whether a territorial frog, Allobates fem...
Article
Full-text available
Although in anurans the predominant mode of intra- and intersexual communication is vocalization, modalities used in addition to or instead of acoustic signals range from seismic and visual to chemical. In some cases, signals of more than one modality are produced through or by the anuran vocal sac. However, its role beyond acoustics has been negle...
Article
Full-text available
Undeniably, acoustic signals are the predominant mode of communication in frogs and toads. Acoustically active species are found throughout the vast diversity of anuran families. However, additional or alternative signal modalities have gained increasing attention. In several anurans, seismic, visual and chemical communications have convergently ev...
Article
Full-text available
Males of all reed frog species (Anura: Hyperoliidae) have a prominent, often colourful, gular patch on their vocal sac, which is particularly conspicuous once the vocal sac is inflated. Although the presence, shape, and form of the gular patch are well-known diagnostic characters for these frogs, its function remains unknown. By integrating biochem...
Data
(a) First part of list of absence and presence data for chemical compounds in tissue samples of 17 specimens belonging to four reed frog species (Hyperolius). (b) Second part of list of absence and presence data for chemical compounds in tissue samples of 17 specimens belonging to four reed frog species (Hyperolius).
Article
Full-text available
Many animals use multimodal (both visual and acoustic) components in courtship signals. The acoustic communication of anuran amphibians can be masked by the presence of environmental background noise, and multimodal displays may enhance receiver detection in complex acoustic environments. In the present study, we measured sound pressure levels of c...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
During calling the vocal sac serves anurans as an air reservoir, in minimizing the loss of sound energy and in distributing calls omnidirectionally. The vocal sac’s role beyond acoustics has been largely neglected in the past. The diversity in vocal sac coloration and shape found in different anuran species is striking to the human observer and rec...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
During calling the vocal sac serves anurans as an air reservoir, in minimizing the loss of sound energy and in distributing calls omnidirectionally. The vocal sac’s role beyond acoustics had been overlooked for some time. The diversity in vocal sac coloration and shape found in different species is striking and recently its visual properties have g...
Article
Full-text available
Males of Tornier’s Forest Toad, Nectophrynoides tornieri, were observed to perform a peculiar display posture, the ‘push-up’: the males raised themselves from a substrate (always a plant structure) by first stretching their fore legs into a ‘sit-up’ and then their hind legs to assume the position. We examined possible functions for the push-up posi...
Article
Full-text available
Males of Tornier's Forest Toad, Nectophrynoides tornieri, were observed to perform a peculiar display posture, the 'push-up': the males raised themselves from a substrate (always a plant structure) by first stretching their fore legs into a ' sit-up' and then their hind legs to assume the position. We examined possible functions for the push-up pos...

Network

Cited By