Irina Nikolaeva

Irina Nikolaeva
SOAS, University of London | SOAS · Department of Linguistics

Professor

About

65
Publications
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696
Citations
Citations since 2017
26 Research Items
387 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230204060
20172018201920202021202220230204060
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (65)
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Presentation at a Philological Society meeting, 13 March 2021
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Paper presented at the workshop Language and Culture Contact in North-Eastern Siberia
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SLE 2022 presentation, Bucharest, 26th August 2022
Article
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External and internal possessors differ from each other in several properties. In contrast to internal possessors, external possessors do not form a constituent with the possessed noun and can participate in clause-level processes such as verb agreement and switch-reference. In this squib, we discuss “intermediate” possessors with both internal and...
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To appear in 2020 Abstract This book describes the morphological system of modern Yukaghir in a historical perspective, and proposes the first ever systematic reconstruction of the main aspects of Proto-Yukaghir inflectional morphology and the historical changes it went through. The reconstruction is put into syntactic context, and based on the e...
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This paper provides an overview of non-canonical patterns of switch-reference involving the converb in (V)p in selected Turkic languages. This converb is usually described as a same-subject converb, but we show that it can conform to McKenzie's (2012) extended definition of "same-subject" as expressing the identity of topic situations, rather than...
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Although possessors internal to an argument DP do not qualify as canonical controllers of verbal agreement, in some languages an internal possessor may be cross‑referenced on an applicative verb. The aim of the paper is to propose a historical scenario for the emergence of this pattern, following the basic insights of the constructional approach to...
Book
http://lincom-shop.eu/epages/57709feb-b889-4707-b2ce-c666fc88085d.sf/de_DE/?ObjectPath=/Shops/57709feb-b889-4707-b2ce-c666fc88085d/Products/%22ISBN%209783862900466%22 This book describes the morphological system of modern Yukaghir in a historical perspective, and proposes the first ever systematic reconstruction of the main aspects of Proto‑Yukagh...
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Full-text available
prosodic structure of Kolyma Yukaghir
Raw Data
A new multimedia collection of materials on the Endangered Languages and Cultures of Siberia
Article
Full-text available
External and internal possessors differ from each other in several properties. In contrast to internal possessors, external possessors do not form a constituent with the possessed noun and can participate in clause-level processes such as verb agreement and switch-reference. In this squib, we discuss “intermediate” possessors with both internal and...
Book
Full-text available
Cambridge Core - Grammar and Syntax - Mixed Categories - by Irina Nikolaeva
Article
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Some languages with switch-reference use same-subject markers in structures where the internal possessor of one subject corefers with another subject, but the subjects do not corefer with each other. We analyse such patterns as a type of non-canonical switch-reference (Stirling 1993; de Sousa 2016) and show that languages differ in what types of po...
Chapter
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This chapter describes possessive constructions in Tundra Nenets (Uralic) with a particular focus on the behavioural and functional properties of lexical possessors. While pronominal possessors always trigger agreement on the possessed noun, lexical possessors only do so in specific circumstances. Agreeing lexical possessors are referred to as prom...
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Definition and challenges Syntacticians generally assume that the properties of the phrasal head are the most important ones for controlling clause-level syntactic processes (Bresnan a; Gazdar et al. ; Pollard and Sag ; Chomsky ; Sag et al. ; Bresnan et al. ; see also Corver ; Fukui and Narita ). Since the primacy of...
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Maithili (Indo-Aryan; India; Nepal) has a complex agreement system in which many terms and non-terms, including subjects, objects, obliques, extra-clausal ‘deictic referents’, and, crucially, possessors within any of these can potentially control agreement on the verb. Agreement is partly determined by grammatical function and argument structure, b...
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uncorrected proofs of the general introduction to the 4-volume edition https://www.routledge.com/Critical-Concepts-in-Linguistics/book-series/SE0014
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A typology of grammatical features offered in Corbett (2012) and Kibort & Corbett (2008, 2010) makes a crucial distinction between two types of interface features reflected in morphology: (i) morphosemantic features, which affect semantics but do not participate in syntax, (ii) morphosyntactic features, which are both semantically charged and relev...
Article
Many languages have morphological devices to turn a noun into an adjective. Often this morphology is genuinely derivational in that it adds semantic content such as ‘similar-to-N’ (similitudinal), ‘located-on/in’ (locational) and so on. In other cases the denominal adjective expresses no more than a pragmatically determined relationship, as in prep...
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Tundra Nenets (Uralic) exhibits unambiguous relative clauses and sentential complements of nouns, but I show that it also has a previously unstudied but structurally distinct GNMCC. The GNMCC covers a diversity of functions although its usage is restricted in various ways. The paper suggests that it has a direct parallel in the non-sentential domai...
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Since the mid-1980s most reference grammars describe syntax in terms of Basic Linguistic Theory, a cumulative descriptive framework that has acquired its methods and concepts from various sources, from traditional grammar to linguistic typology and theoretical syntax. It employs an informal, user-friendly metalanguage so that every reader is able t...
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Two Siberian languages, Tundra Nenets and Tundra Yukaghir, do not obey strong island constraints in questioning: any sub-constituent of a relative or adverbial clause can be questioned. We argue that this has to do with how focusing works in these languages. The focused sub-constituent remains in situ, but there is abundant morphosyntactic evidence...
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The nature and the typological validity of the categories ‘realis’ and ‘irrealis’ has been a matter of intensive debate. In this paper we analyse the realis/irrealis dichotomy in Tundra Yukaghir (isolate, north-eastern Siberia), and show that in this language realis is associated with a meaningful contribution, namely, existential quantification ov...
Book
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Descriptive grammarians and typologists often encounter unusual constructions or unfamiliar variants of otherwise familiar construction types. Many of these phenomena are puzzling from the perspective of linguistic theories: they neither predict nor, arguably, provide the tools to insightfully describe them. This book analyzes an unusual type of re...
Chapter
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Two Siberian languages, Tundra Nenets and Tundra Yukaghir, do not obey strong island constraints in questioning: any sub-constituent of a relative or adverbial clause can be questioned. We argue that this has to do with how focusing works in these languages. The focused sub-constituent remains in-situ, but there is abundant morphosyntactic evidence...
Chapter
Full-text available
Since no implicational relations suggested for finiteness parameters so far have been without exceptions, it is argued that finiteness is a clausal notion which is best characterized by independent criteria belonging to different linguistic components: morphology, syntax, and semantics. There is no uniform dimension called 'finiteness'. Instead, th...
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A detailed picture of periphrasis in Nenets (Uralic) presents a typologically rare instance of periphrasis in a nominal paradigm (as opposed to more familiar verbal periphrasis). Previous accounts treated Nenets nouns as an uncontroversial example of periphrasis, but this chapter demonstrates that a closer look reveals a more complicated picture. I...
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The chapter addresses a set of semantic, syntactic, and categorial criteria for canonical attributive modification and canonical inalienable possession. Canonical attributive modification is expressed by a dedicated word class (adjective) denoting a property concept, while canonical possession is inalienable possession of a relation noun (kin term,...
Book
The series builds an extensive collection of high quality descriptions of languages around the world. Each volume offers a comprehensive grammatical description of a single language together with fully analyzed sample texts and, if appropriate, a word list and other relevant information which is available on the language in question. There are no r...
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The notion of finiteness inherited from the traditional grammar and based on morphological criteria has been ill defined. While some typologists doubt the universality of the finite/nonfinite distinction, others suggest that finiteness is a scalar meta-phenomenon or a functional tendency defined by a cluster of correlating parameters. In this appro...
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In many languages, the objects of transitive verbs are either marked by grammatical case or agreement on the verb, or they remain unmarked: this is differential object marking. This book is a cross-linguistic study of how differential object marking is affected by information structure, the structuring of the utterance in accordance with the inform...
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This is a very early version of the paper published as Nikolaeva, Irina (2015) 'On the expression of TAM on nouns: evidence from Tundra Nenets'. Lingua, (166), pp 99-126. Please refer to the latest version only.
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Tungus proprietives, regularly derived from nouns by affixation, demonstrate a mixed behaviour. As adnominal modifiers, they have the full syntactic and morphological distribution of an adjective. Yet, the base noun retains some nominal properties: it can head its own syntactic phrase, control agreement on its modifier, trigger various anaphoric pr...
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Adjective agreement with coordinated nouns in Finnish presents a puzzling pattern: in some cases, a plural adjective is required with coordinated singular nouns, while in other cases that seemto be syntactically identical, a plural adjective is disallowed. The key to this puzzle lies at the syntax-semantics interface: plural adjectives are required...
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Elena Maslova, A Grammar of Kolyma Yukaghir. (Mouton Grammar Library, 27.) Berlin:Mouton de Gruyter, 2003, xviii + 609 pages, ISBN 3-11-017527-4, EUR 148.
Presentation
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Eastern and Western Armenian possess non-subject participial prenominal relative clause constructions which contrast with respect to the surface expression of the pronominal subject of the embedded verb. This argument is expressed as a person/number affix on the participle (and optional independent pronoun) in Eastern Armenian. In Western Armenian,...
Preprint
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pre-publication version of: Nikolaeva, Irina and Perekhvalskaya, Elena and Tolskaya, Maria (2003) Udeghe (Udihe) texts. Osaka, Japan: ELPR.
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Information structure may be understood as the pragmatic structuring of a proposition in terms of the speaker's assumptions concerning the addressee's state of mind at the time of the utterance. The commonly assumed binominal partition of the information structure into topic-focus, theme-rheme, topic-comment, focus-open proposition, or focus-presup...
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Northern Ostyak (Uralic) has optional object agreement. This paper analyzes the grammatical behavior of objects that trigger agreement and objects that do not, and demonstrates that while the former participate in certain syntactic processes, the latter are syntactically inert. The asymmetry cannot be explained with reference to semantics or argume...
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This paper focuses on two aspects of prenominal non-subject relative constructions (hereafter NSR) typified by W. Armenian and Dagur in (1) and (2): this type of relative, to the best of my knowledge, has been overlooked in descriptive typological studies, despite being one prevalent pattern of person/number marking for NSRs within the Uralic and A...
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The object of this paper is to investigate the prosodic system of Yukaghir from the perspective of Optimality Theory. The analysis reveals that the prosodic word in Yukaghir exhibits continuous left-to-right parsing into bimoraic monosyllabic feet. As a result, the surface occurrence of light monomoraic syllables is prohibited, and various strategi...
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● Canonical properties define abstract typological space of possibilities. ●Take definitions to their logical end point and establish the best, clearest, indisputable instances,(canons). ●Then look at how this theoretical space,is populatedwith real instances,and specify how,far out from the canonical,point they are. ● NB: Canons,are not prototypes...

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Projects (2)
Project
Multimedia collection on endangered languages and cultures of Siberia