Iréne Matthis

Iréne Matthis
Umeå University | UMU

Professsor

About

25
Publications
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57
Citations
Introduction
Iréne Matthis is a pensioned M.D. and Professor of Psychoanalysis. Iréne does research in Emotion, Cognitive Psychology and Neuropsychoanalysis. Published several articles and books on BodyMind issues and questions of Conscioussness.

Publications

Publications (25)
Article
Emotional life is a dynamic complexity where the concept of affect allows us to elucidate the relation between body and mind. The “affective matrix” denotes the potentially meaningful part of the structurally unconscious, what Freud called “supposedly somatic concomitant phenomena” and named “truly psychical”, in “An outline of psychoanalysis”, 194...
Article
It is no exaggeration to state that during the last century neuroscience and psychoanalysis have been not only working separately, but also quarrelling and fighting each other. Exceptions to this rule have been few and isolated, but important. I will mention a few of them, starting from Freud.Today we see a radical shift. Since 2000, a new Internat...
Article
Full-text available
el dibattito contemporaneo sull'interazione mente-corpo i processi emotivi occupano una posizione centrale. Le domande "che cos'è l'affetto" e "che cos'è la coscienza" riassumono le discussioni più re- centi. Nel modello della mente teorizzato da Freud, l'affetto è legato fondamentalmente al raggiungimento del piacere e all'evitamento del dispiacer...
Article
Full-text available
The author argues that analysing affect, a concept lying on the frontier between the mental and the somatic (Freud, 1915a) has to be an embodied pursuit. This line of argument finds support in Freud's second hypothesis in 'An Outline of Psychoanalysis' (1940), where he writes that psychology should look to the somatic processes to see the true esse...
Article
In recent years, neuroscientists have begun to investigate topics that traditionally have been the preserve of psychoanalysts (e.g., consciousness, unconscious mentation, dreams, affect, drive, psychopathology). The explosion of new insights into numerous problems of vital interest to psychoanalysis has not yet been reconciled and coordinated with...

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