Irene Maldini

Irene Maldini
Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences/Centre for Applied Research on Education · Research group Fashion & Technology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

17
Publications
14,326
Reads
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100
Citations
Citations since 2017
11 Research Items
95 Citations
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Introduction
I am senior researcher at the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences. My research focuses on clothing production and consumption volume, its environmental impact, and the solutions that have been proposed to reduce it. My background is in Industrial Design and Design Studies. Before my current position I have worked as a design practitioner and academic in other Uruguayan, Brazilian and Dutch Universities.

Publications

Publications (17)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper discusses challenges in assessing design students within studio model education. It reflects on the assessment methods used in the M.Sc. Digital Design, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, with input from an online survey targeting former students and assessors of the programme. Building on the particularities they see in this asse...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
European clothing consumption has increased dramatically in recent decades, leading to a current average of 26 kg of textiles annually purchased per capita (EEA, 2019). While garments (and most of clothing’s environmental impacts) are produced in other parts of the world, European municipalities face a problem of increasing volumes of textile waste...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Scholars in sustainable consumption increasingly highlight the limitations of "weak sustainable consumption" approaches to overcome the challenges of the current environmental crisis. While efforts to enable cleaner production and circular flows of materials are necessary and important, progress in environmental efficiency tends to deviate attentio...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The article highlights the limitations of speed as a framework for discussing and tackling the environmental challenges of growing clothing volumes or quantities. This argument builds on a series of wardrobe studies mapping the number of clothing items owned, purchased, and disposed of by 25 people during six months, and the reasons behind purchase...
Article
Product lifetimes and obsolescence have been central points of discussion in the fashion field. In this context, design researchers and practitioners have proposed a variety of strategies to enable slower cycles of product replacement, leading to smaller volumes of clothing production and consumption. A previous review of these strategies, however,...
Article
This study offers a new perspective on clothing consumption by uncovering the systemic nature of the wardrobe. The research builds on systems theory and aims at drawing a map of the wardrobe as a system with particular structure and behaviour. By co-designing fictional 'smart wardrobe' services with experts and discussing these services with wardro...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Based on a literature review, this article discusses how the challenge of diminishing clothing production volumes has been approached within the field of sustainable fashion. We identify six common strategies in literature and discuss the approach of user involvement in the process of design and/or manufacture of garments in detail. A critical anal...
Article
Full-text available
This article argues for an updated theoretical framework in fashion studies. It proposes that perspectives emphasizing the social role and the tech-nological nature of dress should be considered complementary, and that their joint application can contribute to new understandings of fashion history. Employing ethnographic methods, this stance is exp...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Personalization, production on-demand, and flexible manufacture facilities are growing within the European apparel sector, supported by national and regional public policy. These developments seem to embody a much waited “paradigm shift” in the fashion industry; a shift from global to local scale, from quantity to quality and from standard products...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The shift from home and custom-made clothing to mass-produced ready-mades in 20 th-century Europe has been the subject of studies from multiple disciplines and across various locations. Contributing to this field of studies, and extending the analysis until the present day, a group of female consumers living in Amsterdam in the 1950s and 2010s were...
Article
Full-text available
The recent popularization of amateur design practices and digital fabrication tools has been accompanied by a vast discourse announcing the emergence of a new production and consumption paradigm. This new participatory model has been assigned, among other benefits, environmental advantages over more traditional ways of manufacture and trade. Howeve...
Article
The process of globalization organizes diversity through homogeneous systems. The influence of this phenomenon in material culture and the role of design in this context are analyzed through the study of the SUN, a Uruguayan traditional product that disappeared under the effect of various parallel global processes. Since this category of objects co...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
How have approaches in sustainable design research evolved together (or not) with sustainable design practice? What has been the relationship between both? Has sustainable design research informed/contested/reinforced, etc. sustainable design practice? How?
I am aware of historical overviews of sustainable design practice, how designers have conceived sustainability and acted accordingly over time (e.g. Madge, 1993; Madge, 1997; Knight, 2009; Keitsch, 2012; Ceschin and Gaziulusoy, 2016). Are there similar overviews regarding sustainable design research?
It seems to me that research has been very much overlapping with practice and that two approaches have dominated academic production: a) using practice-based research to enable a better world and b) analysing initiatives from practice to highlight trends and propose sustainable design strategies for practitioners. Am I right? What other relationships have emerged?

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (5)
Project
In CHANGE, we will investigate what is most essential to reduce the environmental impact of clothing: reduce the amount of clothing that is produced, acquired and disposed of. Environmental impacts from the clothing sector have increased rapidly within the last 30 years, with clothing consumption as an important driver due to the large volumes of clothing that are produced, used and disposed of. Yet, research on clothing consumption, and knowledge of how clothing is used and how this affects the total volume of clothing, is limited. In CHANGE, we will investigate what is most essential to reduce the environmental impact of clothing: reduce the amount of clothing that is produced, acquired and disposed of. CHANGE will concentrate on two important elements in clothing consumption. One is to be properly dressed for the occasion, and the other is clothing standards related to the expectation of variety of garments. Where do these ideas come from? And how have they shaped our clothing habits over the last 200 years? We will look at why and how we change clothes between different occasions and the expectation and desire for variety of garments. The project objective is to improve our knowledge of how clothing volumes can be reduced by increasing the understanding of how people use clothing and how this has developed over time. The project will mainly study Norwegian clothing consumption through quantitative and qualitative wardrobe studies of couples. These will contrast with other wardrobe studies in and outside Europe. By looking at the connection between the individual consumer's practices and different clothing standards, and the consequences this has on an overall level, we will contribute with knowledge and theoretical concepts that bring consumption – the use of clothing - into debates and politics about clothing and the environment. Project leader: Ingun Klepp Funding source: Research Council Norway
Project
Due to the outbreak of Covid-19, the fashion sector faces new challenges. Transitioning from a system of overproduction and overconsumption to ‘survival mode’, many people find themselves in precarious positions. There is an increased visibility of the fundamental problems of the globalized fashion industry and we are experiencing a new (temporary?) digital reality of social/physical distance. We crave for more personal, social and physical connection. In the meantime, there are clear calls for solidarity and for alternative, slower systems. Could these times be an opportunity for a reset of values, for systemic change and a sustainable re-start? Financier(s): SIA KIEM Role: Leader Work Package 1 Project Leader: Daniëlle Bruggeman (ArtEZ Fashion Professorship) Partners: Adriana Galijasevic (Cocircular Lab), Anouk Beckers (designer, practice-based researcher), Aurélie Van de Peer (fashion scholar, writer and lecturer), Borbála Csiszar (MA student ArtEZ), Carolijn Wessels (ArtEZ Fashion Professorship), Daniëlle Bruggeman (ArtEZ Fashion Professorship), Esther Muñoz Grootveld (State of Fashion), Femke de Vries (Warehouse), Freya Zaplata (researcher), Irene Maldini (Hogeschool van Amsterdam),Jan Schoon (communication + PR), Jiyeon Lee (BA students AMFI), Kim Falkenstein (BA students AMFI), Lucie Huiskens (ArtEZ Fashion Professorship), Marco Mossinkoff (Hogeschool van Amsterdam - AMFI), Mariana Pereira da Conceição Monteiro (BA students AMFI), Rens Tap (Modint), Richelle Ijsselmuiden (BA students AMFI), Sanne Karssenberg (Studio Sanne Karssenberg), Steven van Teeseling (State of Fashion), Troy Nachtigall (Hogeschool van Amsterdam).