Irene Calderón-Sanou

Irene Calderón-Sanou
Université Grenoble Alpes · Laboratoire d'Ecologie Alpine (LECA)

Master of Science

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11
Publications
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Introduction
I'm a PhD student aiming at a better understanding of multi-trophic assemblages through the use of environmental DNA at the Laboratoire d'Ecologie Alpine (LECA) in Grenoble, France.

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
Aim It is widely recognized that the prediction of invasion success at large biogeographical scales requires jointly accounting for alien species traits and local community filters, such as abiotic conditions, biotic interactions and propagule pressure. Despite this recognition, interactions between traits and community filters are generally neglec...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding global biodiversity change, its drivers, and the ecosystem consequences requires a better appreciation of both the factors that shape soil macrofauna communities and the ecosystem effects of these organisms. The project "sOilFauna" was funded by the synthesis center sDiv (Germany) to address this major gap by forming a community of so...
Article
Classifying organisms has a wide use and a long history in ecology. However, the meaning of a 'group of or-ganisms' and how to group organisms is still the subject of much theoretical and empirical work. Achieving this long quest requires simplifying the complexity of species niches for which relevant morphological, behavioural, biochemical or life...
Conference Paper
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At the edge of the sixth mass extinction, Anthropos continues the quest of “naming the other” with the promise that identifying all the species on Earth will be the main step of assuring their conservation. However, by self-positioning as the only name-giver, Anthropos has only sharpened the human-nonhuman dualism and restricted kinship to only Ant...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Although soil biodiversity is extremely rich and spatially variable, both in terms of species and trophic groups, we still know little about its main drivers. Here, we contrast four long‐standing hypotheses to explain the spatial variation of soil multi‐trophic diversity: energy, physiological tolerance, habitat heterogeneity and resource heter...
Article
Full-text available
The increasing severity and frequency of natural disturbances requires a better understanding of their effects on all compartments of biodiversity. In Northern Fennoscandia, recent large-scale moth outbreaks have led to an abrupt change in plant communities from birch forests dominated by dwarf shrubs to grass-dominated systems. However, the indire...
Preprint
Full-text available
The increasing severity and frequency of natural disturbances requires a better understanding of their effects on all compartments of biodiversity. In Northern Fennoscandia, recent large-scale moth outbreaks have led to an abrupt change in plant communities from birch forests dominated by dwarf shrubs to grass-dominated systems. However, the indire...
Article
Full-text available
Conspecific negative density dependence (CNDD) is one of the main mechanisms influencing diversity maintenance in tropical forests. Tropical highland forests, in contrast to most lowland forests, are commonly dominated by a few tree species, and testing the importance of density dependence effects on seedling establishment of dominant trees may pro...
Article
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Environmental DNA (eDNA) is increasingly used for analysing and modelling all‐inclusive biodiversity patterns. However, the reliability of eDNA‐based diversity estimates is commonly compromised by arbitrary decisions for curating the data from molecular artefacts. Here, we test the sensitivity of common ecological analyses to these curation steps,...
Article
Full-text available
An isolated population of Astrocasia peltata Standl. was discovered growing on the banks of Brasil Creek in Parque Nacional Diriá, in Costa Rica. This is the first record of the species outside of Mexico where it was believed endemic. An updated morphological description of the species is presented and possible explanations for the disjunct geograp...
Article
Full-text available
Myxomycetes have been studied formally in most of Central America except for El Salvador. Even though this country is the last in the region to begin an official inventory for this group of organisms, the 37 new records reported herein suggest that the myxobiota of El Salvador can be valuable for biogeographical analyses. As an example, this study...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
A major challenge for ecologists is to understand and predict the ecological consequences of climate change, land use change and disturbances. To meet this challenge, we need to account not only for environmental change effects on species performances and ranges but also for effects on species interactions. The alterations of species interactions are likely to create cascading effects that can result in non-linear responses, potentially leading to critical and irreversible transitions of ecosystems at short time scales but also over large spatial scales. The assumption that species interactions are only important at small spatial scales has indeed generated considerable debate. Until recently the prevailing idea was that biotic assembly processes (e.g. interspecific competition and trophic interactions) were only important at small spatial scales. Conceptual work and microcosms experiments early challenged this assumption, which has been strengthened by recent studies empirically demonstrating the importance of biotic interactions up to continental scales. It has been argued that determining the direction and magnitude of global change impacts on species interactions remains one of the greatest challenges for forecasting community and ecosystem dynamics. The main objective of the GlobNets project is thus to decipher multi-trophic assemblages at biogeographic scales and to understand their responses to spatial segregation, environmental gradients and/or human activities. To do so, GlobNets builds on new mathematical developments and environmental DNA metabarcoding. We will collect an unprecedented multi-trophic assemblage dataset of soil-plant biodiversity that covers the three super-kingdoms of life (Eukaryota, Bacteria and Archaea) across multiple forest plots along gradients of climate and land-use pressure in 12 distinct forest sites around the globe (tropical, temperate and boreal forests). GlobNets will address the following objectives: I. Develop publicly available multi-scale, multi-trophic and standardized data comprising sampled sites from major forest biomes of the world that contain information on species and functional group co-occurrences from the whole tree of life. In each sampled site, samples are replicated along environmental or disturbance gradients. II. Develop new mathematical and statistical tools for the analyses of multi-trophic community data from eDNA that allow for unbiased within, between and overall community diversity estimates (i.e. a, ß and ? components) and for an approximation of interaction probabilities within and across trophic levels. III. Based on I and II, map and describe the distribution of forest soil and plant diversity across biomes and test for which trophic levels the latitudinal diversity gradient hypothesis holds. IV. Analyse the response of forest soil and plant diversity to large-scale climate and regional-scale environmental and disturbance gradients, detect co-variation between trophic levels as well as between above and belowground compartments V.Based on a suitable sub-set of the dataset, provide a decomposition of diversity into a, ß, and ? components and test long-standing ecological hypotheses related to disturbance and stress gradients across climatic regions, specific abiotic drivers and trophic levels. VI.Based on the methods developed in II, conduct the first global biogeographical description of soil-based co-occurrence networks for a major ecosystem (i.e. forest) including members from the whole tree of life (i.e. Eukaryota, Bacteria and Archaea). VII.Based on a suitable subset of the data (i.e. including those interaction partners that are identified with enough certainty), investigate how strongly network complexity and modularity are influenced by large-scale climatic filters and regional-scale environmental and disturbance filters. Finally, provide a biogeographical description of network robustness based on simulations of cascading species extinctions.