Ipek G. Kulahci

Ipek G. Kulahci
University of Notre Dame | ND · Department of Biological Sciences

Ph.D.

About

27
Publications
7,080
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
673
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2020 - present
University of Notre Dame
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2009 - November 2014
Princeton University
Position
  • PhD Student
June 2007 - June 2009
SETI Institute
Position
  • Research Associate
Education
August 2009 - November 2014
Princeton University
Field of study
  • Ecology & Evolutionary Biology - Doctor of Philosophy
August 2005 - May 2007
The University of Arizona
Field of study
  • Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
September 2000 - June 2004
Stanford University
Field of study
  • Biological Sciences

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
Full-text available
Organisms are constantly under selection to respond effectively to diverse, sometimes rapid, changes in their environment, but not all individuals are equally plastic in their behaviour. Although cognitive processes and personality are expected to influence individual behavioural plasticity, the effects reported are highly inconsistent, which we hy...
Article
The producer‐scrounger game is a key element of foraging ecology in many systems. Producing and scrounging typically covary negatively, but partitioning this covariance into contributions of individual plasticity and consistent between individual differences is key to understanding population level consequences of foraging strategies. Furthermore,...
Article
Full-text available
The microbial community in the gut is influenced by environmental factors, especially diet, which can moderate host behaviour through the microbiome-gut-brain axis. However, the ecological relevance of microbiome-mediated behavioural plasticity in wild animals is unknown. We presented wild-caught great tits (Parus major) with a problem-solving task...
Article
Full-text available
Cognition arguably drives most behaviours in animals, but whether and why individuals in the wild vary consistently in their cognitive performance is scarcely known, especially under mixed-species scenarios. One reason for this is that quantifying the relative importance of individual, contextual, ecological and social factors remains a major chall...
Article
Understanding the drivers of sociality is a major goal in biology. Individual differences in social connections determine the overall group structure and have consequences for a variety of processes, including if and when individuals acquire information from conspecifics. Effects in the opposite direction, where information acquisition and transmis...
Article
Full-text available
The requirements of living in social groups, and forming and maintaining social relationships are hypothesized to be one of the major drivers behind the evolution of cognitive abilities. Most empirical studies investigating the relationships between sociality and cognition compare cognitive performance between species living in systems that differ...
Article
Strong relationships exist between social connections and information transmission [1-9], where individuals' network position plays a key role in whether or not they acquire novel information [2, 3, 5, 6]. The relationships between social connections and information acquisition may be bidirectional if learning novel information, in addition to bein...
Article
Group members interact with each other during multiple social behaviours that range from aggressive to affiliative interactions. It is not known, however, whether an individual's suite of social behaviours consistently covaries through time and across different types of social interactions. Consistent social behaviour would be advantageous in group...
Article
Full-text available
Animals are predicted to selectively observe and learn from the conspecifics with whom they share social connections. Yet, hardly anything is known about the role of different connections in observation and learning. To address the relationships between social connections, observation, and learning patterns, we investigated information transmission...
Article
Vocal exchanges are predicted to serve a social bonding function by allowing conspecifics to ‘groom-at-a-distance’. If vocalizations play a role in bonding, then they should be mainly exchanged between the socially bonded group members, and thus display high social selectivity that characterizes other affiliative behaviours such as grooming. Howeve...
Article
Full-text available
Individual recognition can be facilitated by creating representations of familiar individuals, whereby information from signals in multiple sensory modalities become linked. Many vertebrate species use auditory-visual matching to recognize familiar conspecifics and heterospecifics, but we currently do not know whether representations of familiar in...
Book
A monkey wakes up next to her group mates as the sun rises. Throughout the day, she needs to make a number of decisions. Who should she forage with? Who should she cooperate with in order to chase away unfamiliar monkeys? Are there any particular individuals that she should avoid interacting with? When she is not foraging or defending her territory...
Article
Food caching animals depend on their caches at times of low food availability. Because stored food is susceptible to being stolen or degraded, many species employ cache protection strategies such as ceasing caching in the presence of others or avoiding storing perishable items for long periods. Several species frequently recover their caches and re...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Networks of interactions based on social associations and movement offer insights into group organization and dynamics, and provide unique tools for biologists 1-5. An important topic in animal social behavior is how individual differences drive group behaviors and shape collective decisions 6. The identity of influential individuals may vary by be...
Article
Full-text available
Pre-earthquake signals have been widely reported, including perturbations in the ionosphere. These precursory signals, though highly diverse, may be caused by just one underlying physical process: activation of highly mobile electronic charge carriers in rocks that are subjected to ever increasing levels of stress. The charge carriers are defect el...
Article
One of the limiting factors for life deep in the rock column is the availability of energy sources. We have continued our study of molecular H2 in igneous and high-grade metamorphic rocks and their constituent minerals (Freund, Dickinson and Cash, Astrobiology 1, 83-92, 2002). The H2 molecules form inside the dense, hard matrix of these minerals fr...
Article
Full-text available
Common igneous and high-grade metamorphic rocks contain dormant defects, which become activated when stressed. They release electronic charge carriers, in particular defect electrons associated with O- states in a matrix of O2-. Known as 'positive holes' or pholes for short, the O- states can spread out of the stressed rock volume, travel along str...
Article
UV irradiation activates highly mobile electronic charge carriers in igneous rocks including basalt, gabbro, and anorthosite. These charge carriers have the remarkable property that they can flow out of the irradiated surface layer and into the unirradiated part. They are defect electrons in the O2- sublattice, known as positive holes or pholes for...
Article
Pre-earthquake signals have long been observed and documented, though they have not been adequately explained scientifically. These signals include air ionization, occasional flashes of light from the ground, radio frequency emissions, and effects on the ionosphere that occur hours or even days before large earthquakes. The theory that rocks functi...
Article
Full-text available
Multimodal signals are common in nature and have recently attracted considerable attention. Despite this interest, their function is not well understood. We test the hypothesis that multimodal signals improve decision making in receivers by influencing the speed and the accuracy of their decisions. We trained bumble-bees (Bombus impatiens) to discr...
Article
Lunar rocks are generally believed to be very "dry" with little or no evidence for hydroxyl as indicators of traces of dissolved H2O. The absence of hydroxyl, however, is not a sure sign of the absence of dissolved H2O. The reason is that hydroxyl pairs in the structure of host minerals, O3X-OH HO-XO3, with X=Si4+, Al3+ etc., tend to undergo an ele...
Article
1. The causes of lagged population and geographical range expansions after species introductions are poorly understood, and there are relatively few detailed case studies. 2. We document the 29-year history of population dynamics and structure for a population of Euphydryas gillettii Barnes that was introduced to the Colorado Rocky Mountains, USA i...

Network

Cited By