Ion Catalin Petritan

Ion Catalin Petritan
Universitatea Transilvania Brasov | unitbv · Department of Forest Management Planning and Terrestrial Measurements

PhD Forest engineer

About

59
Publications
13,618
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860
Citations
Citations since 2017
32 Research Items
616 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140

Publications

Publications (59)
Article
Full-text available
The interest to assess the relationship between forest gap characteristics and topography features has been growing in the last decades. However, such an approach has not been studied in undisturbed mixed sessile oak-beech old-growth forests. Therefore, the present study carried out in one of the best-preserved sessile oak-beech old-growth forests...
Article
Tree-growth-climate relationships are usually assumed to have a stationary character, i.e., continuous and/or time-independent, along the lifetime of the trees. The fact that non-stationarity, i.e., discontinuous and/or time-variable, is more likely to actually be their general rule, has been often neglected in dendrochronology. Nine silver fir, bl...
Article
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The mechanistic pathways connecting ocean-atmosphere variability and terrestrial productivity are well-established theoretically, but remain challenging to quantify empirically. Such quantification will greatly improve the assessment and prediction of changes in terrestrial carbon sequestration in response to dynamically induced climatic extremes....
Article
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The growth of past, present, and future forests was, is and will be affected by climate variability. This multifaceted relationship has been assessed in several regional studies, but spatially resolved, large-scale analyses are largely missing so far. Here we estimate recent changes in growth of 5800 beech trees ( Fagus sylvatica L.) from 324 sites...
Article
Just as the aboveground tree organs represent the interface between trees and the atmosphere, roots act as the interface between trees and the soil. In this function, roots take-up water and nutrients, facilitate interactions with soil microflora, anchor trees, and also contribute to the gross primary production of forests. However, in comparison t...
Article
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To control a forest pest, it is necessary to understand the biotic and/or abiotic factors that can lead to population regulation. Such knowledge is even more critical if the pest is an invasive alien species. This is the case for Corythucha arcuata (Say, 1832), commonly known as the oak lace bug (OLB), an alien insect species that has invaded oak f...
Article
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Climate warming-related drought could become a major driver of large-scale forest dieback. However, little is known about how past management legacies modulate the climate-growth responses during recent dieback episodes in central European oak forests. Here, we examine the role played by past management –unmanaged old-growth vs. managed forests– in...
Article
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In addition to the classic biotic and abiotic factors that have disrupted the health of forests throughout history, lately, the balance of forest ecosystems has been disturbed by different phenomena such as climate change, pollution, and, especially, biological invasions of invasive alien species. One of the alien species that has invaded Europe re...
Article
Uncertainties arising from the so far poorly explained spatial variability of soil respiration (Rs) remain large. This is partly due to the limited understanding on how actually spatially variable Rs is, but also on how environmental controls determine Rs’s spatial variability and how these controls vary in time (e.g., seasonally). Our study was de...
Article
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Studying spatial patterns and habitat association of plant communities may provide understanding of the ecological mechanisms and processes that maintain species coexistence. To conduct assessments of correlation between community compositions and habitat association, we used data from two topographically different plots with 2 ha area in tropical...
Article
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Degradation of tropical forests is a major driver of the global extinction crisis. A key question is understanding the role of evolution history during forest succession in the context of forest restoration for maintaining ecosystem function and stability. This study was conducted in a fragmented forest landscape in the central highlands of Vietnam...
Article
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Research Highlights: Past disturbances occurred naturally in primary forests in the Southern Carpathians. High-and moderate-severity disturbances shaped the present structure of these ecosystems, which regenerated successfully without forestry interventions. Background and Objectives: Windstorms and bark beetle outbreaks have recently affected larg...
Article
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In this paper, site-specific allometric biomass models were developed for European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and silver fir (Abies alba Mill.) to estimate the aboveground biomass in Șinca virgin forest, Romania. Several approaches to minimize the demand for site-specific observations in allometric biomass model development were also investigated....
Article
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The historical loss of natural wetlands in Romania is significant. The building of lakes, ponds, and dams has compensated for some of these losses, as was the case in the study area, the artificial wetlands designated as the Natura 2000 (special protection area, SPA) and Ramsar sites. In this context, to evaluate the conservation status of colonial...
Article
Worldwide increases in droughts- and heat-waves-associated tree mortality events are destabilizing the future of many forests and the ecosystem services they provide. Along with climate, understanding the impact of the legacies of past forest management is key to better explain current responses of different tree species to climate change. We studi...
Article
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Although woody plant encroachment of tropical forest ecosystems has been related to altered disturbance regimes, its impacts on the nearest neighborhood structures and community phylogenetics are still poorly understood. Streblus macrophyllus is a light-demanding species during its early life stages and is shade-tolerant as a mature tree. S. macrop...
Article
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Because of their role in carbon and nutrient exchange, litterfall and leaf area have been increas-ingly studied in the last few decades. However, most existing information comes from managed forests, while comparable data for virgin forests is scarce. To address this scarcity, we investigated a mixed beech – silver fir virgin forest located in the...
Article
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Ring-width series are important for diverse fields of research such as the study of past climate, forest ecology, forest genetics, and the determination of origin (dendro-provenancing) or dating of archeological objects. Recent research suggests diverging climate-growth relationships in tree-rings due to the cardinal direction of extracting the tre...
Article
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Climate change-induced tree mortality is occurring worldwide, at increasingly larger scales and with increasing frequency. How climate change-induced tree mortality could affect the ecology and carbon (C) sink capacity of soils remains unknown. This study investigated regional-scale drought-induced tree mortality, based on events that occurred afte...
Article
Background: The spatial structure of tree species diversity may identify the relative importance of positive, negative and neutral interactions among species and the processes that maintain high species richness in tropical forests. Aims: We tested the hypothesis that common species accumulate higher species richness at small spatial scales than ex...
Article
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Explaining the high diversity of tree species in tropical forests remains a persistent challenge in ecology. The analysis of spatial patterns of different species and their spatial diversity captures the spatial variation of species behaviors from a 'plant's eye view' of a forest community. To measure scale-dependent species-species interactions an...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The number of episodes of forest defoliation and mortality associated with drought events has increased substantially during the last decades, and they are further expected to increase even more given the projected climate change scenarios. These increase in episodes of tree mortality suggest that many tree species worldwide are experiencing their...
Article
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Structural complexity and local biodiversity of species-rich tropical forests can be characterized by their spatial patterns, which contribute to species intra- and interspecific interactions. Aiming to describe spatial patterns of species at fine spatial scales, we applied the quantitative analyses based on the relationships of nearest neighbors o...
Article
The diversity relationship between tree and herb layer has often been investigated, but the results are contradictory. Moreover, few studies of deciduous European species have been conducted to date in natural or near-natural forests, while such studies in old-growth forest with considerable co-dominance of oak are missing. In one of the best prese...
Article
Studies aiming at assessment of factors influencing the interdependence among species often rely on assumptions that can significantly change the results. The goal of this study is to evaluate the impact of analytical assumptions on spatial arrangements of trees within mixed species stands. We used the O-ring statistics computed for two species wit...
Article
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Old-growth forests are often looked at as reference for close to nature silviculture, which aims to manage forests in a natural way. An important component of these forests is the large amount of deadwood they possess; the role of dead wood in the forest ecosystem has been well recognised. A detailed investigation of dead wood characteristics (the...
Article
Light availability in forests is a strong driver for forest development and diversity. Tree species develop differently under varying levels of light. Understanding the reasons for the individual growth strategies of tree species is crucial to understand dynamics of forest communities. This study aims at further disentangling aboveground biomass al...
Conference Paper
Explaining the high diversity of tropical rain forest has been a challenge for ecologists for decades. We applied a recent technique of spatial statistics that is individual species area relationship (ISAR) to study diversity structure of a tropical broadleaved forest based on individual species. The ISAR is combined by species area relationship an...
Article
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Since the 1950s, wind has represented one of the main disturbances to forest ecosystems in Europe, causing an increase in the frequency and amount of trees uprooted or broken by wind. Such phenomenon has also increased the incidence of compression wood in the xylem of remnant trees, thus leading to a general decrease in timber quality. In this stud...
Article
Questions: What are the stand development patterns and successional processes occurring in a Quercus petraea-Fagus sylvatica old-growth forest? Do these two sympatric species have different recruitment and canopy accession strategies? How do they respond to disturbance? Location: Old-growth Q. petraea-F. sylvatica forest in Runcu Grosi Natural Rese...
Article
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The aim of this study was to assess wood quality using diagnostic keys related to the main traits of trunk architecture in the most important resource of resonance spruce of the Romanian Carpathians. The material sampled from standing and felled trees yielded 568 individual ring series adding up to over 81,000 growth rings. The resonance xylotype w...
Article
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The descendants of 33 Norway spruce seed stands were evaluated at 30 years after plantation time, in two field trials established in different environmental conditions: outside of the natural range (ONR), at low altitude (Câmpina trial), and in natural distribution area (INR - Gurghiu trial), in Romania. Evaluations have been made concerning the mo...
Article
In recent decades, natural forest remnants have become increasingly important as reference objects for maintaining or restoring old-growth characteristics in managed forests. Canopy gaps play an important role in forest regeneration, particularly for the establishment and development of tree species with different ecological recruitment patterns. Y...
Article
The paper details an investigation of the stand structure and patterns of diversity observed in the Runcu-Grosi Natural Reserve (western Romania), one of the best preserved natural mixed sessile oak forests in Europe. The effect of the proportion of sessile oak in the stand composition on specific patterns was also studied.Comparable with other nat...
Article
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The horizontal and vertical distribution of live fine roots (diameter < 2 mm) of overstory Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] and their influence on diameter and height growth of underplanted beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) saplings were studied on experimental plots in the Solling Mountains (G...
Article
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The horizontal and vertical distribution of live fine roots (diameter <2 mm) of overstory Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] and their influence on diameter and height growth of underplanted beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) saplings were studied on experimental plots in the Soiling Mountains (Ge...
Article
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In Central Europe, the conversion of pure Norway spruce stands (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) into mixed stands with beech (Fagus silvatica L.) and other species like e.g. Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) is accomplished mainly by underplanting of seedlings beneath the canopy of overstorey spruce trees after partial cutting treatments...
Article
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The reaction of young beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) saplings on competition of two types of vegetation—(1) gramineous with mainly Agrostis capillaries, Calamagrostis epigejos, Deschampsia flexuosa, and (2) small shrubs with mainly Rubus fruticosus and R. idaeus—on clear cuts on two sites was studi...
Article
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Effects of shelterwood and two types of low vegetation cover (shrubs and gramineous) on frost occurence and degree of damages were investigated in young beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesü [Mirb.] Franco) plantations. A late frost event was registered at the end of April 2007 which did not affect saplings below a spruce...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines a new approach to the monitoring of the torrent control structures, which is based on mathematical-statistical research of the frequency and magnitude of the behavioural events recorded during the functional period of these structures. The research material consists of the transverse hydrotechnical works placed in 21 managed tor...
Article
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After 20-25 years from building the hydrotechnical structures for managing the hydrographic torrential network on the Tărlung Valley, the event of uncontrolled installation of forest vegetation on the central corridor of flow, upstream the structure, has developed on a surface of approximately 110 m 2 on average. The average blocking degree of the...
Article
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• Construction cost (g glucose g−1), chemical composition and morphology of leaves of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and two co-occurring valuable broadleaved species (sycamore maple — Acer pseudoplatanus L. — and ash — Fraxinus excelsior L.) were investigated along a horizontal light gradient (3–60% of above canopy radiation) and from top to bottom wi...
Article
Tudose N. C. 2010. The typology, frequency and magnitude of some behaviour events in case of torrential hydrographical management works in the upper Tărlung watershed. Ann. For. Res. 53(2): 161-174, , 2010. Abstract. During the 20-25 years from their startup, the torrential hydro-graphical management works carried out in the upper Tărlung Watershed...
Article
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During the 20-25 years from their startup, the torrential hydrographical management works carried out in the upper Tărlung Watershed (55 dams, 22 sills, 25 traverses and 4 outlet canals) have exposed a number of 24 behaviour event types: 13 out of them reduce the safety of exploitation and the sustainability of the works (hereinafter called damages...
Article
In a field study, we measured saplings of beech, ash and maple growing in a fairly even-aged mixed-species thicket established by natural regeneration beneath a patchy shelterwood canopy with 3–60% of above canopy radiation reaching the saplings. Under low light conditions, maple and ash showed a slight lead in recent annual length increment compar...
Article
Full-text available
We compared shade tolerance of maple, ash and beech in the sapling stage from two sites with rich soils differing in water supply, growing in dense thickets underneath a beech shelterwood of varying canopy densities. Shade tolerance was described by two components: mortality in shade and height growth in high light. At low light, beech showed the l...
Article
Full-text available
The impact of root competition by the overstorey Norway spruce on soil water potential and on root growth of the underplanted seedlings of beech and Douglas-fir over two growing seasons was investigated using a trenching experiment.

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Projects

Projects (9)
Project
The forestry practices to which the Atlantic forests of the Iberian Peninsula have been subjected to in the last century have generated a forest dominated by monospecific plantations of exotic species (especially Eucalyptus globulus from Australia and Pinus radiata from California, Unites States). This trend has perpetuated the loss of both plant and animal biodiversity and the proliferation of forest diseases and fires, along with important losses of soil functioning, soil biodiversity, and soil organic matter (soil erosion), which have increased the incidence of floods and landslides. The ATLANTIS project aims to develop knowledge to reverse these current trends that call into question the long-term soil conservation of the Iberian Atlantic Forests, the stability of these forest ecosystems and the sustainable provision of key ecosystem services. With these purposes in mind, this coordinated project proposal has been designed: (1) to collect robust evidence on how, and to which extent, the current forestry practices determine trends of soil erosion, including losses of soil physical (e.g. soil structure, water infiltration), chemical (e.g. nutrient content, soil organic matter) and biological (soil microbiota diversity and functioning) properties; (2) to link the current status of soil conservation with tree and ecosystem health and with key ecosystem services that forests provide; (3) to develop smart, ecologically friendly forest management practices, which could improve soil conservation and hence the long-term sustainability of the Iberian Atlantic Forests; and (4) to develop tools that may be used to detect early stages of forest vulnerability in order to understand current trends and improve decision-making to optimize forest conservation
Project
Recent studies have pointed out old-growth forests (OGF) as globally important carbon (C) sinks. However, important knowledge gaps, regarding OGF pools and mechanisms of C sequestration, remain. An example in this regard is the role of forest woody debris (WD, fallen dead trees and remains of dead branches on the forest floor), a potentially large but mainly unknown OGF C sink. DeWooD pretends to study in detail the WD contribution to total ecosystem C budgets using a temperate OGF European beech-silver fir. The goals of DeWooD are to better understand: (1) the WD contribution to OGF C stocks; (2) the controls of WD decay by exploring the interactive role of climate, wood traits, decomposers (fungi, saproxylic insects), and deadwood inhabiting organisms (bryophytes). DeWooD’s novelty relies on combining field inventories with different methods to estimate seasonal variations of: rates of WD decay (mass losses, CO2 production) and abiotic and biotic controls of WD decay. DeWooD’s results will provide accurate process-based predictions of the C sink capacity of OGF and accurate estimates of the vulnerability to climate change of key ecosystem compartments (e.g. WD, saproxylic insects, bryophytes) and key processes (WD decay), largely unknown contributors to the OGF C sink capacity. DeWooD will therefore define practical guidelines for forest ecosystem management regarding C sequestration and reduction of the amount of C stored in forests with the aim to mitigate climate change.
Project
The main objective of the REASONING project is to conduct an ecological and genetic study on mixed Douglas fir, Norway spruce, and Silver fir plantations from Romania. The starting motivation of such study is represented by the fact that, although the economic importance of Douglas fir seems to be very well established due to its high quality timber, we still lack important knowledge on its growth performance and drought resilience in the face of climate change. Additionally, although there are several studies comparing Douglas fir and Norway spruce planted trees, little is known about Douglas fir and Silver fir plantations, although this latter species is native to Europe, common in many areas of Central and Eastern Europe, needs very similar to Douglas fir climatic condition, and it is also valued for its timber quality. By combing thus these three conifer species into the same study it would give us a better image on how they all behave in terms of growth performance, drought resistance/tolerance/resilience, provenance, genetic diversity, and ecosystem services. All these topics represent currently gaps of knowledge in Romania, and also in Europe to some extent.