Ioannis D. Papanikolaοu

Ioannis D. Papanikolaοu
Agricultural University of Athens · Department of Natural Resources Management and Agricultural Engineering (NRM&AE)

PhD University College London (UCL)

About

138
Publications
44,087
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1,910
Citations
Citations since 2017
44 Research Items
1181 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
Introduction
Ioannis D. Papanikolaοu is Associate Professor of Structural Geology, Geoenvironment and Natural Hazards at the Laboratory of Mineralogy-Geology, Section of Geological Sciences, Department of Natural Resources Management and Agricultural Engineering (NRM&AE), Agricultural University of Athens. Ioannis does research in Structural Geology and Geomorphology, Natural Hazards, Environmental Geology and Geoinformatics (GIS). He is an Academic Member and Topic Owner of Natural Catastrophe Risk at the Insurance and Reinsurance Stakeholder Group at the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA).'He is also Leader of the International Focus Group “Earthquake Geology and Seismic hazards (EGSHaz) of INQUA International Union for Quaternary Research

Publications

Publications (138)
Article
Full-text available
Surface faulting earthquakes are known to cluster in time from historical and palaeoseismic studies, but the mechanism(s) responsible for clustering, such as fault interaction, strain-storage, and evolving dynamic topography, are poorly quantified, and hence not well understood. We present a quantified replication of observed earthquake clustering...
Article
Full-text available
The Strymon basin (Northern Greece) belongs to the geodynamically active regime of the Aegean and, as expected, it hosts active faults. Nevertheless, the study area exhibits a low instrumentally and historically recorded seismicity. In order to comprehend the crustal deformation, we implemented GNSS- and InSAR-based techniques. Global Navigation Sa...
Article
The cover management factor (C-factor) calculation requires the assessment of the intra‐annual spatiotemporal variability of biomass cover, owed to the natural growth cycle of vegetation and the impact of agriculture on land cover. However, this is frequently omitted, and the vegetation conditions are approximated by assigning constant values to st...
Article
In eastern Crete, several normal faults trend both NNE-SSW and E-W. Most of them form impressive bedrock fault scarps indicating ongoing extension in the Hellenic fore-arc. No earthquakes from historical and instrumental catalogues can be directly associated with these faults. Geomorphologic profiles across five different faults in sites well-prese...
Article
Full-text available
The agricultural uses of the Coordination of Information on the Environment Land Cover (CLC) dataset suffer from limitations such as temporal stationarity, low spatial resolution, broad and rather simplified grouping of classes. The study attempts to address these shortcomings, using as test site the Sperchios River catchment, Central Greece. The G...
Article
Full-text available
The Plio-Quaternary Mygdonia Basin in Northern Greece is bounded by active normal faults that can host significant earthquakes and produce considerable damage to the city of Thessaloniki (the second biggest city in Greece – 1 million population), located only 15–20 km away. In 1978, a damaging M = 6.5 earthquake occurred along a fault in the southe...
Article
Full-text available
To assess whether continental extension and seismic hazard are spatially-localized on single faults or spread over wide regions containing multiple active faults, we investigated temporal and spatial slip-rate variability over many millennia using in-situ ³⁶ Cl cosmogenic exposure dating for active normal faults near Athens, Greece. We study a ~ NN...
Article
Full-text available
Soil changes, including landslides and erosion, are some of the most prominent post-fire effects in Mediterranean ecosystems. Landslide detection and monitoring play an essential role in mitigation measures. We tested two different methodologies in five burned sites with different characteristics in Central Greece. We compared Unmanned Aerial Vehic...
Article
As of January 2016, the Solvency II Directive demands that all insurance companies in the EU perform a Solvency Capital Requirement (SCR) calculation. We propose an earthquake catastrophe model that calculates the SCR using an innovative hazard module. We test our model in the Attica region, which hosts 41.6% of the insured buildings in Greece. The...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Forest fires burn with varying severity across landscapes. As severity is tied with fire’s ecological effects, evaluating and mapping it after a fire, is highly useful for efficient post-fire assessment and management. The aim of this study is to introduce the broadly used Composite Burn Index (CBI) for the assessment of fire severity in Greece. Ad...
Article
This study presents new thermochronometric data to constrain the cooling history of the Pindos fold-and-thrust-belt (PFTB) on the NW Peloponnese, and the timing of nappe stacking in the external Hellenides in western Greece. Low-temperature thermochronology was performed on apatite and zircon minerals extracted from basal exposures of the PFBT in M...
Article
Full-text available
Analysis of two small semi-mountainous catchments in central Evia island, Greece, highlights the advantages of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) based change detection methods. We use point clouds derived by both methods in two sites (S1 & S2), to analyse the effects of a recent wildfire on soil erosion. Results ind...
Article
Full-text available
Frost is one the most significant hazards affecting various aspects of human lives including infrastructure, agriculture, economy and biodiversity. Water bodies are one of the key factors controlling temperature fluctuations and frost. This study introduces a contemporary method for identifying and spatially analyzing frost risk and also explores i...
Article
Full-text available
This article is a response to the publication by Nick Marriner, David Kaniewski, Christophe Morhange, Clement Flaux, Matthieu Giaime, Matteo Vacchi and James Goff entitled “Tsunamis in the geological record: Making waves with a cautionary tale from the Mediterranean”, published in October 2017 in Science Advances. Making use of radiometric data set...
Preprint
Earthquakes are known to cluster in time, from historical and palaeoseismic studies, but the mechanism(s) responsible for clustering, such as evolving dynamic topography, fault interaction, and strain-storage in the crust are poorly quantified, and hence not well understood. We note that differential stress values are (1) output by calculations of...
Article
Full-text available
Recent tsunami events have shown that tsunamis may propagate far inland by entering rivers mouths and may cause massive damage along the river banks. However, so far, only a few studies have been conducted such a search for studying tsunami signals in incised valley systems along the Mediterranean coasts although the tsunami hazard is high. The isl...
Article
The eastern Corinth Gulf is constantly uplifted at least since Middle Pleistocene. This uplift is the combined result of the regional uplift and the activity of major active faults which influence the area. These tectonic movements which control the sedimentation processes of the study area resulted in a complex stratigraphy, paleogeography and pal...
Article
Event deposits of high-energy waves in the Eastern Thermaikos Gulf and Kassandra Peninsula (Northern Greece) are investigated, and evidence for the 479 BC " Herodotus tsunami " is described for the first time. One of the first historical descriptions of tsunami waves and its effects on Persian troops near Potidaea in 479 BC was made by Herodotus. S...
Article
Normal faulting earthquakes rarely rupture the entire extent of active normal faults, and can also jump between neighbouring faults. This confounds attempts to use segmentation models to define the likelihood of future rupture scenarios. We attempt to study this problem comparing the offsets produced in single earthquakes with those produced by mul...
Article
Full-text available
The western Peloponnese was repeatedly hit by major tsunami impacts during historical times as reported by historical accounts and recorded in earthquake and tsunami catalogues. Geological signatures of past tsunami impacts have also been found in many coastal geological archives. During the past years, abundant geomorphological and sedimentary evi...
Article
The Late Bronze Age (LBA) tsunami and the A.D. 365 tsunami are supposed to have affected the northern coasts of Crete. However, near-coast sedimentary archives have been rarely investigated in this area, and sedimentary archives including palaeotsunami fingerprints are still unknown. The main objective of our research was to search for appropriate...
Poster
Full-text available
The world-wide first description of a tsunami and its effects in 479 BC was made by Herodotus. The wave hit the coast of Chalkidiki peninsula Greece where we investigated different areas from Angelochori down to Posidi (Kassandra peninsula) and the ruins of Mende. Ancient Mende was a quite important city in the classic Hellenistic period, already f...
Article
Borehole Bh-3, located at the eastern part of the Corinth Isthmus (Greece) in a highly active extensional tectonic environment, is studied in detail. The lithology of the 70-m-long borehole is described, and 55 samples extracted from the core are analyzed for their micropaleontological content. Quantitative analysis of foraminiferal fauna assemblag...
Article
Full-text available
The deformation of the eastern Corinth rift (Greece) is distributed along several E-W trending active normal faults. Here the 25-km-long Pisia fault experienced up to 150 cm of coseismic displacement during the 1981 Alkyonides earthquake sequence (M = 6.7, 6.4, 6.3). Using terrestrial laser scanning, coupled with analyses of color changes, lichen c...
Preprint
Full-text available
The deformation of the eastern Corinth rift (Greece) is distributed along several E-W trending active normal faults. Here, the 25-km-long Pisia fault experienced up to 150 cm of coseismic displacement during the 1981 Alkyonides earthquake sequence (M = 6.7, 6.4, 6.3). Using terrestrial laser scanning, coupled with analyses of color changes, lichen...
Article
Full-text available
Results from a multidisciplinary investigation at the Lastros-Sfaka Graben located in eastern Crete are presented. 1.3 km of the Lastros fault was scanned with t-LiDAR and we identified areas with minor external influences (anthropogenic, depositional or erosional) to extract throw rates. Preliminary postglacial throw rates are 0.67 ± 0.15 mm/yr.,...
Article
Full-text available
Τhe most important active fault that intersects the eastern tip of Corinth Canal,the Kalamaki-Isthmia fault, is studied in detail, involving data analysis from nine boreholes, magnetic susceptibility measurements within boreholes and paleoenvironmental interpretations. Samples taken from boreholes were analysed and paleoenvironmental changes in the...
Article
Full-text available
Tidal notches are a generally accepted sea level indicator that, when different from mean sea level, witness tectonic activity at or near coastlines. However, how to infer related information is controversial since tectonic uplift from a single seismic event is not likely to exceed several decimetres. High resolution laser scanning offers the avail...
Article
The Environmental Seismic Intensity (ESI) scale has been officially released in 2007 and is based on the quantification of Earthquake Environmental Effects. Due to its quantitative nature, the scale improves the process of assessing macroseismic intensities, particularly in the epicentral area of those cases in which sole traditional intensity scal...
Article
Full-text available
Many active normal faults throughout the Aegean juxtapose footwall limestone against hanging-wall colluvium. In places, this colluvium becomes cemented and forms large hanging-wall lobes or sheets of varying thickness attached to the bedrock fault. Investigations at the Lastros Fault in eastern Crete allow us to define criteria to distinguish betwe...
Article
Full-text available
The southwestern coast of Crete, one of the most seismically active regions in Europe, experienced co-seismic crust uplift by 9 m during the Ms = 8.3 mega-earthquake that struck the eastern Mediterranean world on 21 July AD 365. An associated tsunami event caused thousands of fatalities and destroyed many coastal settlements and infrastructure betw...
Article
Full-text available
Tidal notches have had the potential to form at sea-level from ~6.5 kyr BP in the Mediterranean basin and preserve a symmetrical shape comparable to a quadric polynomial. Continuous erosion, predominantly by biological agents, affects a limestone cliff face from low- to high-tide level at <1 mm/yr. Statically determined, the roots of a quadric poly...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The deformation of the Corinth rift (Greece) is distributed along several E-W trending active normal faults like the 25-km-long Pisia fault, which experienced up to 110 cm of coseismic displacement during the 1981 Alkyonides earthquake sequence (Mw 6.7). Ages of paleoearthquakes and slip rate estimates of the Pisia fault are not known so far, despi...
Article
Full-text available
Many areas of the Earth’s crust deform by distributed extensional faulting and complex fault interactions are often observed. Geodetic data generally indicate a simpler picture of continuum deformation over decades but relating this behaviour to earthquake occurrence over centuries, given numerous potentially active faults, remains a global problem...
Article
Full-text available
Many areas of the Earth’s crust deform by distributed extensional faulting and the occurrence of earthquakes reflects complex fault interactions. Geodetic data may indicate a simpler picture of continuum deformation over decades but relating this behaviour to earthquake occurrence over centuries, given numerous potentially active faults, remains a...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Fires of 2007 have consumed large areas of Black pine and endemic fir forests in Greece. The current research aims at examining the role of geomorphology and lithology that govern the soil properties upon the post-fire vegetation recovery at the landscape level. A case study from Taygetos Mt, a large part of which was burned in 2007, is presented....
Article
Traditional seismic hazard assessment methods are based on the historical seismic records for the calculation of an annual probability of exceedance for a particular ground motion level. A new fault-specific seismic hazard assessment method is presented, in order to address problems related to the incompleteness and the inhomogeneity of the histori...
Article
The Lastros and Sfaka faults have an antithetic relationship and form a ca. 2 km wide graben within the Ierapetra fault zone in eastern Crete. Both faults have impressive bedrock fault scarps many metres in height which form prominent features within the landscape. t-LiDAR investigations undertaken on the Lastros fault are used to accurately determ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Tidal notches form at sea-level, predominantly on limestone coasts, during the Holocene. When present-day sea-level is different from distinct and stacked expressions coastal tectonic activities are inferred, in general. However, the relation between the offset of different notch generations and coseismic uplift produced from a single event remains...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Tidal notches have had the potential to form at sea level from ~6,000 years BP in the Mediterranean basin and preserve a symmetrical shape comparable to a quadratic polynomial. Statically determined, the roots are defined by the tidal range. However, gradual variations of eustatic sea-level rise and coseismic uplift in tectonically active regions c...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Τhe most important active fault that intersects the eastern tip of Corinth Canal,the Kalamaki-Isthmia fault, is studied in detail, involving data analysis from nine boreholes, magnetic susceptibility measurements within boreholes and paleoenvironmental interpretations. Samples taken from boreholes were analysed and paleoenvironmental changes in the...
Conference Paper
Results from a multidisciplinary investigation at the Lastros-Sfaka Graben located in eastern Crete are presented. 1.3 km of the Lastros fault was scanned with t-LiDAR and we identified areas with minor external influences (anthropogenic, depositional or erosional) to extract throw rates. Preliminary postglacial throw rates are 0.67 ± 0.15 mm/yr, w...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Tidal notches are a generally accepted sea level indicator that, when different from mean sea level, witness tectonic activity at or near coastlines. However, how to infer related information is controversial since tectonic uplift from a single seismic event is not likely to exceed several decimetres. High resolution laser scanning offers the avail...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Today fires are widely accepted to be a natural agent in forest ecosystems. Nevertheless besides direct impacts of fire, secondary postfire effects may have a considerable impact on the welfare and safety of the affected society. Our research is focused on secondary post-fire hazards like landslides, debris flows, flash floods and erosion processes...
Article
Full-text available
Two normal faults on the island of Crete and mainland Greece were studied to test an innovative workflow with the goal of obtaining a more objective palaeoseismic trench log, and a 3-D view of the sedimentary architecture within the trench walls. Sedimentary feature geometries in palaeoseismic trenches are related to palaeoearthquake magnitudes whi...
Article
Northern Attica in Greece is characterized by a set of north dipping, subparallel normal faults. These faults were considered to have low tectonic activity, based on historical earthquake reports, instrumental seismicity and slip rate estimates. This study presents new data for one of these faults, the Milesi Fault. We run GIS based geomorphologica...
Article
Full-text available
Fault slip data are analysed from the E-W striking northern and southern Lapithas Mountain faults, which respectively form the northern and southern boundary between the Alpine mountain horst and the Quaternary basins. Kinematic indicators such as corrugations and striations show that slip directions vary on both these individual faults, which is t...
Article
Full-text available
Northern Attica in Greece is characterized by a set of north dipping, subparallel normal faults. These faults were considered to have low tectonic activity, based on historical earthquake reports, instrumental seismicity and slip rate estimates. This study presents new data for one of these faults, the Milesi Fault. We run GIS based geomorphologica...
Article
Two normal faults on the Island of Crete and mainland Greece were studied to create and test an innovative workflow to make palaeoseismic trench logging more objective, and visualise the sedimentary architecture within the trench wall in 3-D. This is achieved by combining classical palaeoseismic trenching techniques with multispectral approaches. A...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Earthquakes on Crete in the Eastern Mediterranean that larger than M=5.5 leave there imprint in the landscape as fault scarps. The majority of normal faults through this region comprise postglacial bedrock footwall scarps juxtaposed against Quaternary hanging-wall sediments and are the expression of repeated earthquake ativity and surface faulting....
Article
Surface slip distributions for an active normal fault in central Italy have been measured using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), in order to assess the impact of changes in fault orientation and kinematics when modelling subsurface slip distributions that control seismic moment release. The southeastern segment of the surface trace of the Campo Fe...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The deformation of the Corinth rift is distributed over numerous normal faults. For instance the ~17-km-long Pisia fault, which experienced up to 150 cm of coseismic displacement during the 1981 Alkyonides earthquake sequence (Mw ~6.7). We investigated a site at the central part of the Pisia fault, which is only affected by minor erosional and depo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We present the preliminary results from a multi-method investigation on the Lastros-Sfaka Graben located in the Ierapetra Fault Zone in eastern Crete. We scanned c. 1.2 km of the Lastros Fault with t-LiDAR and identified areas for throw rate calculations at locations with no external influences (anthropogenic or erosional). Preliminary maximum thro...