Ioannis Kontopoulos

Ioannis Kontopoulos
University of Copenhagen · GLOBE Institute - Section for GeoGenetics

PhD

About

22
Publications
12,473
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
499
Citations
Citations since 2016
21 Research Items
496 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
Additional affiliations
April 2020 - present
University of Copenhagen
Position
  • Master's Student
January 2019 - March 2020
Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
April 2015 - March 2019
The University of York, Department of Archaeology
Field of study
  • Archaeology
September 2013 - September 2014
The University of Sheffield, Department of Archaeology
Field of study
  • Human Osteology and Funerary Archaeology - (Distinction)
October 2008 - October 2009
University of Oxford, RLAHA
Field of study
  • Archaeological Science

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
Full-text available
This study compares histological preservation in archaeological bones from different burial types to unravel the histotaphonomy‐to‐funerary practices relationship. Αn intra‐skeletal approach is also adopted to explore intra‐individual (inner ear part of the petrous bone vs upper/lower limb long bones) and intra‐bone (proximal vs distal diaphysis) v...
Article
Studies of funerary practices provide information about many aspects of death in past societies. However, only limited archaeological evidence documents the circumstances under which cremations occurred and the person(s) who were performing the funerary rituals. Lying at the border between Atlantic and Continental cultural traditions, the Scheldt a...
Article
Full-text available
Cremation is a complex mortuary practice, involving a number of activities of the living towards the dead before, during, and after the destruction of the bodily soft tissues by fire. The limiting information concerning these behavioral patterns obtained from the pyre remains and/or cremation deposits prevents the reconstruction of the handling of...
Presentation
Full-text available
Sedimentary ancient DNA (sedaDNA) can provide valuable information on past biodiversity. Adsorption of DNA molecules onto mineral surfaces is vital for its long-term survival, and the mineral surface charge and the environmental conditions are key factors controlling the DNA-mineral interactions. Adsorption of double stranded (ds) DNA can occur dir...
Poster
Full-text available
The recovery and sequencing of sedimentary ancient DNA (sedaDNA) can provide valuable information on past biodiversity. Its long-term survival however depends on its adsorption to mineral surfaces. The DNA adsorption capacity of a mineral is highly dependent on mineral surface charge, and the composition and ionic strength of the background electro...
Article
Full-text available
The Cycladic, the Minoan, and the Helladic (Mycenaean) cultures define the Bronze Age (BA) of Greece. Urbanism, complex social structures, craft and agricultural specialization, and the earliest forms of writing characterize this iconic period. We sequenced six Early to Middle BA whole genomes, along with 11 mitochondrial genomes, sampled from the...
Poster
Full-text available
Environmental DNA (eDNA) is a relatively new and powerful tool that can provide valuable information for the detection of past (ancient eDNA) and present (contemporary eDNA) organisms in ancient and modern environments. eDNA is nuclear, mitochondrial or chloroplast DNA released into the environment. Adsorption of DNA molecules onto mineral surfaces...
Article
Objectives The Falys–Prangle‐method assesses age‐related morphological changes to the sternal clavicle end (SCE), enabling the observation of mature adults from the 5th decade onwards in unburnt human skeletal remains. The aim of this study is to investigate the applicability of the Falys–Prangle‐method on burnt human remains. Materials and method...
Article
Full-text available
Paleoproteomics and the study of ancient proteins has become an important consideration in bioarchaeological research as we seek to understand the relationship between the physical skeleton and its underlying biochemistry. Osteocalcin is an abundant, non-collagenous protein that is accessible archaeologically due to its affinity for hydroxyapatite...
Article
Full-text available
The adoption of a new funerary ritual with all its social and cognitive meanings is of great importance to understanding social transformations of past societies. The first known occurrence of cremation in the territory corresponding to modern Belgium dates back to the Mesolithic period. From the end of the Neolithic onward, the practice of cremati...
Article
Full-text available
The recovery and analysis of ancient DNA and protein from archaeological bone is time-consuming and expensive to carry out, while it involves the partial or complete destruction of valuable or rare specimens. The fields of palaeogenetic and palaeoproteomic research would benefit greatly from techniques that can assess the molecular quality prior to...
Article
We investigated the rate at which endogenous DNA from differently prepared (butchered, boiled and baked) compact pig bones degrades in five different Danish terrestrial and marine environments over a period of 12 months. Although >70% of the estimated endogenous mtDNA is lost after just four weeks of exposure, no cytosine deamination of DNA was obs...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents the characteristics of bone diagenesis in a secondary commingled Mycenaean burial in Kastrouli (Phocis, Greece) through the histological (light microscopy), physical (FTIR-ATR), and biochemical (collagen) analysis of seventeen human (including two petrous bones) and seven animal bones. Post-mortem modifications in bone microstru...
Article
Genome-wide analysis of 67 ancient Near Eastern cattle, Bos taurus, remains reveals regional variation that has since been obscured by admixture in modern populations. Comparisons of genomes of early domestic cattle to their aurochs progenitors identify diverse origins with separate introgressions of wild stock. A later region-wide Bronze Age shift...
Article
The discovery of petrous bone as an excellent repository for ancient biomolecules has been a turning point in biomolecular archaeology, especially in aDNA research, but excessive and uncontrolled sampling could result in loss of this valuable resource for future research. This study reports on the histological (optical microscopy), physical (FTIR-A...
Article
Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy using attenuated total reflection (ATR) is commonly used for the examination of bone. During sample preparation bone is commonly ground, changing the particle size distribution. Although previous studies have examined changes in crystallinity caused by the intensity of grinding using FTIR, the effect o...
Article
An understanding of the structural complexity of mineralised tissues is fundamental for exploration into the field of diagenesis. Here we review aspects of current and past research on bone and tooth diagenesis using the most comprehensive collection of literature on diagenesis to date. Environmental factors such as soil pH, soil hydrology and ambi...
Article
Bone is a highly specialised form of hard and rigid connective tissue whose histological structure undergoes post-mortem modifications. In taphonomic research, histological examination of bone thin sections is used to investigate these post-mortem microstructural changes in skeletal tissues. In this study, diagenetic modifications in pig skeletal r...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, the subsistence patterns of two prehistoric communities on the island of Euboea were reconstructed using carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of human and faunal bone collagen. The Late Neolithic (5300/5200-3300/3200 B.C.) samples were obtained from Tharrounia (human n=14, faunal n=4), while the Early Bronze Age (2900/2850-2350/...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (6)
Project
With DENMARK I will: (1) Assess DNA-mineral associations and correlate with eDNA preservation state in sediments from terrestrial, freshwater and marine settings. (2) Quantify the Gibbs free energy (ΔGbu) and kinetic bond parameters of in vitro DNA-mineral interactions for a range of sedimentary minerals and a range of environmentally relevant solution compositions . (3) Examine the nature, fraction and stability of interacting bonds of in vitro DNA-mineral associations at the bulk level. (4) Link the sediment data to the in vitro single bond and bulk data to make a conceptual model for addressing the characteristics and longevity of different DNA-mineral systems, and improve eDNA extraction protocols. Environmental DNA (eDNA) is trace amounts of DNA released by organisms into water and sediments. It has recently attracted a lot of attention as it can be a valuable tool for detecting present and past organisms without the need to directly sample them. However, biotic and abiotic decay has severe effects on DNA survival. The adsorption of DNA to mineral surfaces in sediments as well as saline conditions have been shown to protect DNA molecules and decrease the DNA decay rate. Understanding which minerals and environmental conditions provide the best preservation of adsorbed DNA can thus allow us to: a) target such environments for paleoecological and palaeogenetic studies; b) serve as a quantitative tool for assessing DNA migration, i.e. is the recovered eDNA autochthonous?; and c) significantly advance eDNA extraction and analysis protocols by targeting and extracting eDNA from specific minerals. Currently, we only have a qualitative understanding of the DNA-mineral adsorption/desorption at the bulk level and we have no quantitative insight into the DNA-mineral interactions and solution conditions that enhance DNA survival, nor the combined impact on DNA longevity in natural environments.
Archived project
This research project has three primary aims: 1. to understand to what extent petrous bone can constitute a reservoir of surviving biomolecules. 2. to provide new data for the successful screening of archaeological bone prior to collagen and DNA analyses. 3. to provide a foundation for future investigations to further explore bone diagenesis.
Project
The CRUMBEL project studies the collections of cremated bone found in Belgium dating from the Neolithic to the Early-Medieval period using state of the art analytical and geochemical analyses. Recording the Belgian collections in a database including as much osteoarchaeological information represents a crucial part of this project. Until now the dominance of cremation as funeral practice between 3000 BC and 700 AD in Northern Europe led to limited information on migrations and living conditions. CRUMBEL will greatly improve our current understanding of how people lived in Belgium. https://www.crumbel.org/