Ingrid Vilà-Giménez

Ingrid Vilà-Giménez
Universitat de Girona | UDG · Department of Specific Didactics (Faculty of Education and Psychology)

PhD in Language Sciences

About

16
Publications
7,126
Reads
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117
Citations
Introduction
PhD in Language Sciences from the Universitat Pompeu Fabra. Postdoctoral researcher working at the Dept. of Subject-Specific Education at the Universitat de Girona (Margarita Salas fellowship). My research focuses on the multimodal integration of gesture, speech, and prosody, and its significant role in children's language development and in teaching-learning processes. Research member of the GrEP (Universitat Pompeu Fabra) and the GRECA (Universitat de Girona). – See www.ingridvilagimenez.com
Additional affiliations
March 2022 - present
Universitat de Girona
Position
  • Postdoctoral Researcher
Description
  • Postdoctoral Researcher (Margarita Salas fellowship; Funded by European Union-NextGenerationEU, Ministry of Universities and Recovery, Transformation and Resilience Plan, through a call from Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona)
September 2020 - March 2022
Universitat de Girona
Position
  • Adjunct Professor
March 2018 - present
Universitat Oberta de Catalunya
Position
  • Collaborator Teacher
Description
  • Supervision of Master’s thesis - M.A., Learning Difficulties and Language Disorders
Education
September 2015 - June 2016
University Pompeu Fabra
Field of study
  • Linguistics
September 2014 - June 2015
University of Barcelona
Field of study
  • Teacher training
September 2010 - June 2014
Universitat de Girona
Field of study
  • Philology

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Full-text available
Though the positive effects of iconic gestures on word recall and comprehension by children have been clearly established, less is known about the benefits of beat gestures (rhythmic hand/arm movements produced together with prominent prosody). This study investigated (a) whether beat gestures combined with prosodic information help children recall...
Article
Full-text available
Iconic and pointing gestures are important precursors of children’s early language and cognitive development. While beat gestures seem to have positive effects on the recall of information by preschoolers, little is known about the potential beneficial effects of observing beat gestures on the development of children’s narrative performance. We tes...
Article
Full-text available
Gesture is an integral part of language development. While recent evidence shows that observing a speaker who is simultaneously producing beat gestures helps preschoolers remember and understand information and also improves the production of oral narratives, little is known about the potential value of encouraging children to produce beat gestures...
Article
Full-text available
Speakers produce both referential gestures, which depict properties of a referent, and non-referential gestures, which lack semantic content. While a large number of studies have demonstrated the cognitive and linguistic benefits of referential gestures as well as their precursor and predictive role in both typically developing (TD) and non-TD chil...
Article
Full-text available
A longitudinal study with 45 children (Hispanic, 13%; non-Hispanic, 87%) investigated whether the early production of non-referential beat and flip gestures, as opposed to referential iconic gestures, in parent-child naturalistic interactions from 14 to 58 months old predicts narrative abilities at age 5. Results revealed that only non-referential...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Research on prosodic development has mostly focused on infants' skills, and there is much less research on preschool and older children's prosodic abilities and in particular on the advanced pragmatic uses of prosody (i.e., pragmatic prosody). The present cross-sectional study assesses children's expressive pragmatic prosody profiles in three devel...
Article
Full-text available
While recent studies have claimed that non-referential gestures (i.e., gestures that do not visually represent any semantic content in speech) are used to mark discourse-new and/or-accessible referents and focused information in adult speech, to our knowledge, no prior investigation has studied the relationship between information structure (IS) an...
Article
Full-text available
While it is well known that prosodic features are central in the conveyance of pragmatic meaning across languages, developmental research has assessed a narrow set of pragmatic functions of prosody. Research on prosodic development has focused on early infancy, with the subsequent preschool ages and beyond having received less attention. This study...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Gestures are harbingers of children's linguistic steps. Further in development, evidence has demonstrated that using iconic character-viewpoint gestures when performing more complex linguistic discourses (e.g., narratives) can predict better-structured, complete goal-based stories. However, previous studies have not assessed and compared the develo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Gestures can be described in various terms including their form, their relationship to spoken prosody, their semantic relationship with an utterance, or their pragmatic functions (see [1] for a review). However, McNeill's [2] classic descriptive types, with referential categories (iconic, metaphoric and deictic) distinct from a rhythmic category (b...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Children from 5 to 6 years of age have been shown to start producing non-referential beat gestures in narrative speech. However, it still remains unclear how the use of these non-referential gestures along with referential iconic gestures evolves over time in children’s narrative discourse, and how the temporal integration between gestures and pros...
Thesis
Full-text available
Co-speech gestures are children’s first path towards communication. Further in development, research has primarily focused on the role of iconic gestures in boosting children’s narrative abilities, while less is known about the effects of non-referential gestures. The main goal of this PhD dissertation is to investigate the scaffolding role of non-...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (5)
Project
This project is comprised of two studies that follow a longitudinal approach. Specifically, it analyses the predictive value of non-referential gestures and referential gestures in children's later narrative abilities.
Project
This project aims to analyze (a) the temporal integration between gesture and speech prominence and (b) the development of gesture and IS in children's narrative discourse.
Project
We are developing a labeling system that proposes a multidimensional approach to gesture analysis, in that researchers may code for dimensions of the form of the gesture, independent of its relationship with speech prosody, or of its various pragmatic meanings. At the same time, this labeling scheme challenges a simplistic definition of non-referential "beat" gestures as biphasic rhythmic non-meaningful gestures.