Ingrid Pollet

Ingrid Pollet
Dalhousie University | Dal · Department of Biology

PhD

About

48
Publications
12,120
Reads
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1,904
Citations
Introduction
Ingrid Pollet currently holds a MITACS post-doc position at Acadia University and Birds Canada, studying the level of mercury in Leach's storm-petrels.
Additional affiliations
June 2017 - June 2017
Dalhousie University
Position
  • Demonstrator
Description
  • Marine Ornithology Field Course
June 2015 - July 2015
Dalhousie University
Position
  • Demonstrator
Description
  • Marine Ornithology Field Course
January 2011 - January 2016
Dalhousie University
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Influence of Extrinsic Factors on Movements and Reproductive Success of Leach’s Storm-Petrels (Oceanodroma leucorhoa)

Publications

Publications (48)
Article
Mercury (Hg) is globally-distributed, with severe toxic effects on wildlife. Methylmercury biomagnifies within food webs, so long-lived, top predators such as seabirds are prone to high mercury concentrations. We synthesized historical and contemporary data on mercury concentrations in seabirds from the North Atlantic. We collected 614 values deter...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation of mobile organisms is difficult in the absence of detailed information about movement and habitat use. While the miniaturization of tracking devices has eased the collection of such information, it remains logistically and financially difficult to track a wide range of species across a large geographic scale. Predictive distribution m...
Article
Full-text available
Reproduction in procellariiform birds is characterized by a single egg clutch, slow development, a long breeding season and obligate biparental care. Female Leach’s Storm Petrels Hydrobates leucorhous, nearly monomorphic members of this order, produce eggs that are between 20 and 25% of adult body weight. We tested whether female foraging behaviour...
Article
Bycatch in fisheries remains one of the biggest conservation threats to seabirds globally, but there has been limited attention given to bycatch in the Arctic. Here, we worked with Inuit commercial fishers in the Cambridge Bay region of Nunavut to record bycatch of birds, as part of a fish bycatch reporting initiative, in weir and gillnet fisheries...
Article
Full-text available
The widely held assumption that any important scientific information would be available in English underlies the underuse of non-English-language science across disciplines. However, non-English-language science is expected to bring unique and valuable scientific information, especially in disciplines where the evidence is patchy, and for emergent...
Preprint
Full-text available
The widely held assumption that any important scientific information would be available in English underlies the underuse of non-English-language science across disciplines. However, non-English-language science is expected to bring unique and valuable scientific information, especially in disciplines where the evidence is patchy, and for emergent...
Article
Full-text available
Seabirds are declining worldwide, and predation by introduced and endemic species is one threat that affects many of them. Leach’s Storm Petrel Hydrobates leucorhous (hereafter LHSP) populations are declining in a number of locations for reasons that are likely multicausal, and perhaps local or regional, but relative contributions of individual cau...
Article
People who are colour‐blind or have some form of colour vision deficiency form an invisible minority and scientists should strive to be as inclusive as possible. We reviewed 2873 figures published in 2019 from 1031 scientific papers in 27 ornithological journals to determine those that were colour‐blind compatible, and those that were black‐and‐whi...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis) was categorized as ́Vulnerable` by the IUCN after a study revealed a rapid wintering population decline of 65% between 1992–1993 and 2007–2009 in the Baltic Sea. As knowl-edge about the European long-tailed duck’s life cycle and movement ecology is limited, we investigate its year-round spatiotem...
Article
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Long-tailed Ducks (Clangula hyemalis) breed around lakes in tundra vegetation and spend their winter at sea. Their most important wintering site in Europe is the Baltic Sea, and most of the birds wintering there breed in northern Russia. In light of recent population declines, particularly of the Baltic Sea wintering population, it is important to...
Poster
Full-text available
Leach’s storm-petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa = Hydrobates leucorhous) is a small seabird species that was listed as globally vulnerable on the IUCN’s Red List of Threatened Species in 2016. Breeding populations have declined more than 30% over the last three generations in Atlantic Canada. Elevated mercury exposure may be contributing to this specie...
Article
Populations of Leach's Storm-Petrels (Oceanodroma leucorhoa) are in decline globally, but causes of these declines are unclear. One possibility is predation at breeding colonies. To estimate effects of one pair of Great Horned Owls (Bubo virginianus) on a Leach's Storm-Petrel colony, we analyzed owl pellets collected from Bon Portage Island, Nova S...
Article
Full-text available
Shearwaters and petrels (hereafter petrels) are highly adapted seabirds that occur across all the world’s oceans. Petrels are a threatened seabird group comprising 124 species. They have bet-hedging life histories typified by extended chick rearing periods, low fecundity, high adult survival, strong philopatry, monogamy and long-term mate fidelity...
Article
Regular estimates of breeding populations are important for detecting declines and for implementing appropriate conservation measures in a timely manner. In Atlantic colonies, Leach’s Storm Petrels Oceanodroma leucorhoa are in decline at most colonies that have been surveyed. Consequently, the species has recently been uplisted from ‘Least Concern’...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about the movements of small seabirds during migration, but such information is important for their conservation. Leach’s Storm Petrel Oceanodroma leucorhoa is the most abundant seabird in Atlantic Canada, but its population has declined in recent years. Here, we describe trans-equatorial and trans-Atlantic migration movements of 13...
Article
Knowing the spatial scales at which effective management can be implemented is fundamental for conservation planning. This is especially important for mobile species, which can be exposed to threats across large areas, but the space use requirements of different species can vary to an extent that might render some management approaches inefficient....
Article
Full-text available
Long-distance movements are characteristic of most seabirds in the order Procellariiformes. However, little is known about the migration and foraging ranges of many of the smaller species in this order, especially storm-petrels (Hydrobatidae). We used Global Location Sensors to document the year-round movements of sympatrically breeding Fork-tailed...
Article
Full-text available
Despite their importance in marine food webs, much has yet to be learned about the spatial ecology of small seabirds. This includes the Leach's storm-petrel Oceanodroma leucorhoa, a species that is declining throughout its Northwest Atlantic breeding range. In 2013 and 2014, we used global location sensors to track foraging movements of incubating...
Article
Full-text available
Mercury (Hg) is a ubiquitous heavy metal that occurs naturally in the environment, but its levels have been supplemented for decades by a variety of human activities. Mercury can have serious deleterious effects on a variety of organisms, with top predators being particularly susceptible because methylmercury bioaccumulates and biomagnifies in food...
Article
Bulwer's petrels are nocturnal seabirds that mostly prey on mesopelagic fauna. As aerial foragers and shallow divers, their feeding opportunities are limited by near-surface availability of their prey, which is highly variable both temporally (reflecting diurnal and lunar cycles) and spatially. Here we studied how Bulwer's petrels cope with these c...
Article
Sable Island is the most isolated seabird colony site in eastern Canada and the United States, offering a unique opportunity to study the population dynamics of terns and gulls in an area removed from human activities. Sable Island likely supported tens of thousands of terns prior to 1900, but the population declined during the first half of the 20...
Article
Full-text available
Populations of Leach’s Storm-petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa; hereafter storm-petrel), one of the most widespread procellariiform seabirds in the world, appear to be declining in many parts of their breeding range. As part of a regional effort to assess status of storm-petrel colonies in eastern North America, we estimated apparent survival and recap...
Article
Full-text available
Accumulating evidence suggests that Atlantic populations of Leach's Storm-Petrels (Oceanodroma leucorhoa) are experiencing significant declines. To better understand possible causes of these declines, we used geolocators to document movements of these small (similar to 50-g) pelagic seabirds during migration and the non-breeding period. During 2012...
Article
Knowledge of foraging movements during the breeding season is key to understanding energetic stresses faced by seabirds. Using archival light loggers (geolocators), a Bayesian state–space model, and stable isotope analysis, we compared foraging movements of Leach's storm-petrels Oceanodroma leucorhoa during their incubation periods in 2012 and 2013...
Article
Full-text available
A Leach's Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa) initially banded on Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain in October 1995 was recaptured on Bon Portage Island off the south tip of Nova Scotia, Canada in August 2009, 13 years and 10 months later, and some 4,660 km and 51° longitude away. Recoveries on breeding areas of seabirds that were originally banded...
Article
Migrating salmon can increase productivity in Pacific Northwestern streams and lakes through the deposition of nutrients from their decomposing carcasses after spawning. Several studies also report simultaneous biotransport of persistent organic pollutants that have contaminated lake food webs, although no similar effect has been shown conclusively...
Article
Full-text available
The Western Yellow-breasted Chat (Icteria virens auricollis (Deppe, 1830)) is a Neotropical migrant, with a Canadian distribution restricted to breeding populations in southern British Columbia. Given its small population size and diminishing breeding habitat, Yellow-breasted Chats are federally endangered in Canada. We used genotypic data at eight...
Article
Full-text available
Aberrant expression of Jagged1 and Notch1 are associated with poor outcome in breast cancer. However, the reason that Jagged1 and/or Notch overexpression portends a poor prognosis is unknown. We identify Slug, a transcriptional repressor, as a novel Notch target and show that elevated levels of Slug correlate with increased expression of Jagged1 in...
Article
The potential to promote neovascularization in ischemic tissues using exogenous agents has become an exciting area of therapeutics. In an attempt to identify novel small molecules with angiogenesis promoting activity, we screened a library of natural products and identified a sulfated steroid, sokotrasterol sulfate, that induces angiogenesis in vit...
Article
Full-text available
During embryogenesis, vascular and hemopoietic cells originate from a common precursor, the hemangioblast. Recent evidence suggests the existence of endothelial precursors in adult bone marrow cells, but it is unclear whether those precursors have a role in tumor neovascularization. In this report, we demonstrate that murine bone marrow contains en...
Article
Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a secreted cytokine that plays a major role in the formation and maintenance of the hemopoietic and vascular compartments. VEGF and its receptors, VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2, have been found to be expressed on subsets of normal and malignant hemopoietic cells, but the role of the individual receptors in hemopoi...
Article
With advancements in the analytical technologies and methodologies in proteomics, there is great interest in biomarker discovery in biofluids such as serum and plasma. Current hypotheses suggest that the low molecular weight (LMW) serum proteome possesses an archive of clipped and cleaved protein fragments that may provide insight into disease deve...
Article
Full-text available
The endothelium forms a continuous monolayer at the interface between blood and tissue and contributes significantly to the sensing and transducing of signals between blood and tissue. New blood vessel formation, or angiogenesis, is initiated by the activation of endothelial cells and is an important process required for various pathological and ph...
Article
VEGF is a secreted growth factor that mediates its biological effects by binding to two transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors, VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2. VEGF has previously been shown to be critical in the establishment of cells of the hematopoietic and endothelial lineages. VEGF and its receptors are expressed on subsets of hematopoietic cells, and a...
Article
Full-text available
Notch proteins comprise a family of transmembrane receptors. Ligand activation of Notch releases the intracellular domain of the receptor that translocates to the nucleus and regulates transcription through the DNA-binding protein RBP-Jkappa. Previously, it has been shown that the Notch4 intracellular region (N4IC) can inhibit endothelial sprouting...
Article
Various studies have identified a critical role for Notch signaling in cardiovascular development. In this and other systems, Notch receptors and ligands are expressed in regions that undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation. However, there is no direct evidence that Notch activation can induce mesenchymal transdifferentiation. In this stud...
Article
Full-text available
The intracellular pathways by which inflammatory mediators transmit their angiogenic signals is not well studied. The effects of a potent inflammatory mediator, bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), are transmitted through Toll-like receptors (TLRs). A major, although not exclusive, LPS/TLR intracellular signaling pathway is routed through TNF (tumor...
Article
Full-text available
Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors play an essential role in the formation and maintenance of the hematopoietic and vascular compartments. The VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) is expressed on a population of hematopoietic cells, although its role in hematopoiesis is still unclear. In this report, we have utilized a strategy to sel...
Article
Full-text available
Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, is home to the largest oil sands mining operation in the world. Two of the companies currently mining the oil sands hope to use wetlands formed from oil sands effluent as part of their reclamation strategy required at mine closure. To evaluate the ability of these created wetlands to sustain amphibians, one populatio...
Article
The objective of this study was to determine if trace metal bioavailability from suspended particulate matter (SPM) and recently deposited lake sediment (LS) to the filter-feeding bivalve Mytilus trossulus was dependent on the nutritional content and/or the geochemistry of the sediment. For SPM these characteristics are seasonally dependent; for LS...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The BfN funded MEERESENTEN project aims to determine thresholds for long-tailed ducks wintering and molting in the German part of the Baltic Sea by: - Determining breeding success of seaducks breeding in the Russian Arctic. - Using data loggers to improve understanding of habitat parameters during migration and resting stages. - Studying nutritional ecology using stable isotope analysis and genetic methods. At the same time, the age structure of ducks will be determined in stopover areas. From these figures, population thresholds will be derived.
Project
Project (co-)lead: Erpur S. Hansen, April Hedd (Environment and Climate Change Canada). Project partners: Johannis Danielsen (The Faroe Marine Research Institute), Norman Ratcliffe (British Antarctic Survey), Mark Bolton (RSPB), Tim Dunn (JNCC). Partnership is open. Project description: In 2016, Leach’s Storm-Petrel (LSP) was assessed as globally threatened and uplisted to "Vulnerable" on the IUCN Red-List. In the Northwest Atlantic, containing >90% of the Atlantic-basin breeding population, numbers have declined by >40% over the last three decades. Similar declines have been detected in the largest Northeast Atlantic colonies. The LSP population on the island of Dun, St Kilda, Scotland declined by 54% between 1999 and 2006, and playback surveys in Elliðaey I., Westman archipelago, Iceland in 2017 and 2018 demonstrated -40-49% reduction in density since 1991. Causes of decline are likely to vary among colonies and be cumulative in nature, and include predation, contaminants (Hg [high in LSP tissues], microplastics, anthropogenic risks (e.g., light pollution and consequent stranding on land at oil and gas platforms) and climate-related change at breeding and wintering grounds; relative impacts of these stressors are poorly understood. Productivity in Canada and St Kilda are favorable, but low adult survival in Canada and high predation level by Great Skuas on St Kilda suspected to be key demographic drivers for their population declines. What is likely to be the world’s largest population of the closely related, but IUCN ”Least Concern” -Listed, European Storm-Petrel (ESP) breeding main breeding in the Faroes, with smaller populations in Britain, Ireland and the Westman archipelago, Iceland. Robust population estimates are lacking for most ESP colonies and trends in population size are largely unknown. Demographic information for ESP (productivity and adult survival rate) is dated and geographically limited. Given the two storm-petrel species occupy similar ecological roles, have similar wide-ranging distribution during the non-breeding season distribution and are susceptible to similar suite of threats, the significant knowledge gaps are cause of concern. Key objectives are to: (1) Fill regional information gaps regarding population size and, where possible, trends in abundance for both species at key sites throughout the Atlantic. Given the synchrony in LSP population declines in the Atlantic, it seems plausible that conditions in winter (e.g., food availability, or risk exposure at-sea) combined with other local pressures during the breeding season could be driving population decline; (2) Monitor productivity and adult survival for both species in the collaborating countries; (3) Identify foraging, migration and wintering areas of LSP, and quantify the degree of migratory connectivity for regional populations. (4) Determine diet composition for both species in Iceland, to compare with information from Canada and Scotland. General diet composition and a related contaminant comparison is an important part of contrasting demographic performance and interpreting effects. High mercury loads of Canadian LSP are believed in part to be associated with predominance of mesopelagic myctophid fish in the diet. Project timeline: 2018-2023; original timeline extended due to Covid-19 restrictions. Engagement of and relevance to local communities and indigenous peoples: Participation of local fieldwork volunteers is important to the project in Iceland, and local landowner participation is fundamental for the project in the Faroes. Key deliverables and timeline: Key deliverables for the project include an Atlantic-wide (within the CAFF/CBird boundary assessment) of population status and trends for LSP, and ESP in 2023. Country specific deliverables: Canada: Overall status and trend of Atlantic Canadian LSP population conducted in 2020 for COSEWIC, as part of national species status assessment process; publication planned for 2021. Publication on long-term demographic monitoring (adult survival and productivity) for LSP at key sites in Newfoundland planned for 2021. GLS tag deployments at 4 Canadian colonies in 2018-19 were replicated and extended both regionally and to Iceland in 2019-20. Covid-19 restrictions delayed targeted Canadian deployments in 2020, including at the large colony on Baccalieu Island. A publication on basin-wide patterns of movement, migration and regional population-level mixing on the wintering grounds is planned for 2022. Contaminant studies assessing regional patterns of mercury exposure and effects on survival and reproduction are ongoing. Faroe Islands: Nólsoy I. is likely the world largest ESP colony, designated a Ramsar site in 2012. ESP playback in Nólsoy in 2012-2014 and partially in 2018, will be financed annually from 2019. Installation of 28 ESP nest boxes in Nólsoy in 2018. Iceland. An extensive survey on Elliðaey I. in 2018 confirmed a 74% decline there but also revealed that the 1991 population estimate (198.000 AOB) was a considerable overestimate (due to biased habitat surveying). Preliminary calculations indicate that the LSP population was around 68.000 AOB in 1991 prior to the decline reflecting a LSP population estimate of about 18.000 AOB in 2018. Population surveys of ESP at Elliðaey I. and both species at other key sites in the Westman archipelago (delayed in 2019-2020), are planned post Covid-19 as is a publication updating the Icelandic population size and trend for LSP. First Icelandic estimates of survival for ESP and LSP are being estimated from the national ringing data from Elliðaey I., Westmans. In 2018, Petrel remains were found in 30-40% of 120 gull regurgitates. This predation level is thought to have increased in the last decade with Lesser Black-backed gull colonization from <5 to 120 nests in 2018. 11 GLS loggers were deployed in Elliðaey I. in 2019, and 20 in 2020, two were retrieved in 2020, the first for the E-Atlantic. Breeding success monitoring schemes are being initiated, and studies on contaminants and diet are planned pending Covid-19. Scotland: The majority of LSP and ESP surveys undertaken for the Seabirds Count Census are now complete, with the final survey of the Flannan Isles taking place in 2021. Population estimates and trends will be available at the time of the census publication in 2022. Relevance to other initiatives: The information collected will be important for future management of LSP and ESP populations in the North Atlantic, and for LSP it will contribute directly to conservation actions recommended by IUCN in 2016. Budget: Each partner is self-funded. Possible venues of collaborative funding are being examined. Canada - this forms part of a larger project aimed at understanding the causes of population decline for LSP with funding provided by Environment and Climate Change Canada and Bird Studies Canada. Faroes – volunteer based field work and nest box building and deployment. Iceland - Icelandic Storm-Petrel Population Monitoring Program has been based on volunteer field work program funded by RSPB and SINRC. Scotland – Ongoing “Seabirds Count” since 2015. Project status: Ongoing.