Ingo Müller

Ingo Müller
Stockholm University | SU · Department of Zoology

Master of Science

About

Introduction
Currently I am doing my PhD at Stockholm University, Naturhistoriska riksmuseet and the Museum für Naturkunde in Berlin. In this project, I investigate the biogeography and hybridisation patterns in two genera of New Guinean birds, with all samples coming from museum collections. The project will entail a high-quality de-novo genome assembly as well as genome resequencing. Bioinformatic analyses will include tools and methods such as STRUCTURE, PSMC, ABBA-BABA or F-statistics.

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This project aims to characterize inversions in Oceanian munia finches (genus Lonchura) and describe their distribution across the system using both a RAD-seq dataset and low-coverage whole genome sequences. I also look for patterns of selection by employing different population genetic statistics using mainly ANGSD and vcftools.
Project
The purpose of this project is to investigate the biogeography and hybridisation patterns in a genus of New Guinean honeyeaters (Melidectes) and in the Birds-of-Paradise genus Paradisaea. This project promises deeper insights into hybridisation as a driver of macroevolutionary change and its effects on speciation. All samples for both genera are stored in natural history collections. The first aim will be to assemble a high-quality de-novo reference genome for Melidectes torquatus which will be used as an outgroup. I will then re-sequence several individuals from multiple localities of four focal species of Melidectes and six species of Paradisaea. Both datasets will be analysed similarly and split into two chapters. Chapters I and III will describe (a) the biogeography of each respective group through population structure analyses and (b) genetic diversity in this system through different population genetic statistics. Chapters II and IV will then investigate (c) hybridisation patterns and why hybridisation only occurs in specific locations in Melidectes and whether and how gene flow is present in this system. Lastly, I aim to (d) estimate recent and past introgression in both genera. Furthermore, the inclusion of more distantly related taxa in the second half of the project will allow me to gain insights into evolutionary impacts of divergent hybridisation.