Inger Marie Berg-Hansen

Inger Marie Berg-Hansen
University of Oslo · Museum of Cultural History

Doctor of Philosophy

About

26
Publications
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Introduction
Inger Marie Berg-Hansen currently works at the Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo. Inger does research in Stone Age Archaeology.

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
The coastal settlement in Middle Mesolithic Southeast Norway is generally described as a dynamic system of small, short-lived sites and large sites that were visited repeatedly over a long time. It has been suggested that in this period – compared to the preceding Early Mesolithic – an increased attraction towards the large archipelagos along the N...
Book
Full-text available
Steinalderen i Sørøst-Norge. Faglig program for steinalderundersøkelser ved Kulturhistorisk museum inneholder en helhetlig oversikt over utgravinger av 430 boplasser, begravelser, depoter, fangstanlegg m.m. fra år 2000 til 2017, og presenterer en bred og oppdatert redegjørelse for forskningsstatus knyttet til steinalderen (ca. 9500–1700 f.Kr.) i re...
Article
Full-text available
This article aims to contribute novel data and perspectives into the long-standing debate about economic strategies in the fourth and third millennium in South Norway, by introducing novel results from a Pitted Ware coastal site in Agder County, southern Norway. The analysis of artifactual and faunal assemblages as well as lipid analysis from ceram...
Chapter
Traditionally, the Stone Age of Northern Europe has been studied employing typological approaches to formal tool types. Focus has been on establishing typologies and chronologies on national or regional geographical scales. In this paper, we take a new approach, mapping variation in lithic technological practice by identifying the development of me...
Article
The sea and the coast have always been central to Norwegian Stone Age research, and most of the archaeological sites we know from the period are located along the coast. Natural conditions associated with the land uplift after the last Ice Age have provided unique opportunities for exploring the coastal settlement of the Stone Age. The general sent...
Article
Full-text available
The earliest settlement of Latvia occurred at the very end of the Late Glacial, after the retreat of the ice sheet. Important evidence of this earliest occupation is the well-known site Salaspils Laukskola. Previous research has focused on the typological aspects of this assemblage, and the use of lithic raw materials, suggesting an affiliation to...
Chapter
Northernmost Germany represents one of the regions in North-West Europe where a succession of Late Palaeolithic traditions makes it possible to describe the techno-economic changes which led from the Late Upper Palaeolithic to the beginning of the Mesolithic. The aim of this paper will be to propose a model of the techno-economic evolution of the A...
Article
Full-text available
(http://www.sarks.fi/fa/faxxxvi.html) The Eastern Baltic Stone Age is characterized by several major shifts in tool technology. Our pic¬ture of cultural change is currently based on typological variation in well-preserved bone tools, ceramics, stone tools, and on diversity in lithic raw-material use. These variations have partly been interpreted as...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We present a study of variability in morphological and metrical attributes of the projectile inventory from the Final Palaeolithic to the Middle Mesolithic (10 900-7000 BC) in Northwest Europe, and compare this with the simultaneous development in blade production methods. The study is based on technological and morphological analysis from 43 excav...
Article
Full-text available
We describe a tanged point and a blade technology from Rubha Port an t-Seilich, Isle of Islay, Scotland that provides further support to a Late Pleistocene or Early Holocene presence in Scotland prior to the establishment of the narrow blade Mesolithic industry. The existing evidence for a Late Pleistocene or early Holocene presence comes from isol...
Chapter
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The site Alt Duvenstedt LA 121 is one of the best documented Ahrensburgian contexts in Schleswig-Holstein (Clausen 1996; 2004), which makes it well suited for detailed technological studies. It is also one of the oldest known Ahrensburgian sites. A recent study of the lithic assemblage reveals new aspects of the blade production at the site. This a...
Cover Page
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EAA 2019 - Call for papers Session 284: "Untangling the Final Palaeolithic and Early Mesolithic in Europe" Session format: Regular session Content: The last Ice Age came to an end 11,500 years ago when rapid climate warming of c. 5-10°C occurred within decades radically transforming Europe's environment. This change in the landscape had a signifi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper present an investigation of projectile point variability from the Final Paleolithic to the Middle Mesolithic (10 900-7000 BC) in Northwest Europe seen in relation to the concurrent blade production methods. The study is based on technological and morphological analysis from 55 excavated sites in Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Northwest Germ...
Article
A long‐standing debate in archaeology concerns the sources of technological diversification among prehistoric hunter‐gatherers. This includes the study of the emergence and spread of pressure blade technology in Northern Europe during the Early Holocene. Until now, there has been little technological study of lithic collections from the East Baltic...
Chapter
At the end of the last Ice Age, Northern Scandinavia was colonized from the north European mainland by groups of hunters and gatherers. It seems that the entire coast from Bohuslän to Finnmark was settled within only a couple hundred years. At present approximately 550 sites dated to this period are known in Norway alone. However, we don’t know the...
Thesis
Title: The Social Technology – Technology and Tradition in Northern Europe at the end of the Ice Age, 10,900 - 8,500 BC. Unpublished PhD Thesis, Department of Archaeology, Conservation and History, Faculty of Humanities, University of Oslo, 2017. Abstract: The thesis discusses how lithic technology can form the basis for studies of social relation...
Book
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I 2005 og 2006 ble det til sammen gjennomført 132 utgravninger av arkeologiske kulturminner i Kulturhistorisk museums distrikt. Det store flertallet av disse ble utført i forbindelse med utbyggingsprosjekter. Undersøkelsene har produsert et stort og verdifullt datamateriale fra forhistorisk tid og middelalder på Øst- og Sørlandet. Med denne utgivel...
Article
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Searching for early farms. Kjelsvika – a marginal settlement from Bronze Age and Iron Age in a central area at Lista, Vest-Agder. The excavations done by the Lundevågen Project in Kjelsvika at Lista in 2006-2007 uncovered traces of settlement and farming, as well as gravemounds, dated to the Bronze Age and Early Iron Age. These findings were unexpe...
Chapter
Full-text available
The wheel in the well - a rare find from a pre-Roman settlement at Borgenhaugen, Sarpsborg municipality, Østfold, Norway. Summary: In 2003 a wooden disc wheel was discovered on the bottom of a well at Borgenhaugen, Sarpsborg, Østfold County in the context of an Iron Age settlement site. This is the oldest wheel so far found in Norway dating to the...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The project aims to identify variation and changes in the projectile inventory from Final Palaeolithic to Middle Mesolithic (10900 – 7000 cal. BC). Seen in relation to the development in blade production methods and concepts within the same time frame, we will explore the reasons behind the variation and how this can provide new insights on interaction dynamics and the culture-historical development of the Stone Age of Northwest Europe.