Indre Genelyte

Indre Genelyte
Linköping University | LiU · Ageing and Social Change (ASC)

Doctor of Philosophy

About

5
Publications
469
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Citations
Introduction
Indre Genelyte received her doctoral degree at the Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society (REMESO), Linköping University. Her thesis is entitled ‘Lost in Mobility? Labour Migration from Baltic Lithuania to Sweden’.

Publications

Publications (5)
Article
Full-text available
The labour market activity of older workers and their ability and disposition to maintain it depend on institutional conditions, age norms, labour demand and shifting overall economic conditions. The paper discusses exclusion and inequality in later working life from a European comparative perspective and emphasises shifts in late work and retireme...
Chapter
This chapter aims to make both theoretical and empirical contributions to the better understanding of intra-European migration from New Member States (NMS) to Old Member States (OMS ). It does so by addressing Lithuanian migration to Sweden from the perspective of the sending country and the testimony of the migrants themselves. It aims to explain...
Article
Full-text available
This article connects micro and macro scales of inequality to Lithuanians’ decisions to depart to Sweden during the economic crisis with austerity measures and its aftermath (2008–2013). This period revealed unequal opportunities regarding the quality of life that were largely created by the gradual re-commodification of labor as well as unaddresse...
Thesis
Full-text available
This thesis seeks to make both theoretical and empirical contributions to the understanding of intra-EU mobility, with a focus on labour migration from Lithuania to Sweden. Inspired by a critical realist perspective, the thesis aims to help to explain the dynamics and individual decision-making behind mass labour emigration from the Baltic states,...
Chapter
At a time when migration policy has moved to the centre of national and European policy agendas, the three Baltic states are taking their first steps towards building a cohesive policy response to emigration. This is especially important in the wake of the global financial crisis, which generated an increased outflow from the Baltic states. The Bal...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Ageing societies need to extend working lives and EIWO pushes the boundaries of knowledge about late working life and the potential of its inclusive and equal prolongation via a theoretically driven, gender-sensitive combination of multi-level perspectives. EIWO takes a life-course approach on exclusion and inequality by security of tenure, quality of work, workplaces and their consequences. EIWO identifies life-course policies promoting life-long learning processes and flexible adaptation to prolong working lives and to avoid increased exclusion and inequality. It provides evidence for policies to ensure both individual, company and societal benefits from longer lives EIWOit has five objectives: 1) To produce new knowledge on chances and limits of longer working lives through investigating nature, sources and effects of exclusion and inequalities in Sweden and Europe with a focus on workplaces as the decisive level to realise late exits in practice. 2) To assess policy, institutional and corporate-level influences on unequal employment chances and life-long learning opportunities, security levels and their impact on late work trajectories. 3) To gain an in-depth understanding of how earlier life courses influence and structure perceptions and accumulations of inequality and disadvantage. 4) To inform Swedish social and employers’ policies for inclusive and fostering labour markets by an enhanced understanding of alternative practices within Europe. 5) To propose policies to minimise risks that cumulate over the life course and to mitigate exclusion and inequalities in late working life. The programme builds on current and previous research as well as on an international network of senior and junior scholars. Added value comprises theoretical advances, methodological innovation and impact on EU- and national labour market and branch- and company policy.
Project
This thesis seeks to make both theoretical and empirical contributions to the understanding of intra-EU mobility, with a focus on labour migration from Lithuania to Sweden. Inspired by a critical realist perspective, the thesis aims to help to explain the dynamics and individual decision-making behind mass labour emigration from the Baltic states, its socioeconomic consequences and policy responses. Theoretically, the thesis proposes a model that synthesizes a social transformation approach with an extended version of Hirschman’s analytical framework of exit, voice and loyalty. The three empirical articles, based mainly on semi-structured interviews, are situated within this framework. Two of the articles seek to explain the migrants’ decision-making process of stay-exit-entrance in the context of the structural-institutional social changes that followed (1) independence from the Soviet Union in 1990; (2) EU accession in 2004; and (3) the 2008/2009 economic crisis with austerity. The third article brings into the debate the perspective of the sending Baltic countries, in a broader context of the East-West migration debate. The dissertation shows that the consequences of the neoliberal policies of the post-communist and post-crisis transformations, together with the construction of formal migration channels after EU accession, constitute various migrant categories. Individual strategies of actively looking for channels to exit and enter, combining them in different ways at various points of the migratory process and establishing informal social networks are re-constituting who can be and who is a migrant. Furthermore, following the economic crisis and austerity measures, the decision to emigrate extends beyond individual survival strategies, instead becoming bound to an individual’s perception of the (ine)quality of life and pursuit of a better quality of life for oneself and one’s family across time and in different places. Finally, as the interviewed Baltic experts agree, the EU’s policy of the free movement is socially and economically problematic, although the official Baltic states’ policy responses focus primarily on ‘talented’ and ‘needed’ diaspora members’ return or engagement. These policies have proved to be inadequate to address demographic and socioeconomic challenges in part brought about by emigration. The structural-institutional conditions, states’ and migrants’ strategies engender mobility as a social norm in the sending countries and promote and constitute the perpetuation of migration of both ‘precarious labour migrants’ and ‘active talented EU mobile citizens’.