Inaki Carril Mundinano

Inaki Carril Mundinano
Monash University (Australia) · Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute

PhD

About

31
Publications
3,171
Reads
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401
Citations
Introduction
Inaki Carril Mundinano currently works at the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute, Monash University (Australia). Inaki does research in Neuroscience.

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
In the past decade, the New World common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) has taken a seminal position in neurobiological research, fueled in part by its smooth cortical sheet, which allows cortical areas to be easily accessed by current technologies on the dorsal surface of the brain. In this protocol, we describe a method for the precision placement...
Article
Retinotopic specializations in the ventral visual stream, especially foveal adaptations, provide primates with high-acuity vision in the central visual field. However, visual field specializations have not been studied in the dorsal visual stream, dedicated to processing visual motion and visually guided behaviors. To investigate this, we injected...
Article
An evolutionary hallmark of anthropoid primates, including humans, is the use of vision to guide precise manual movements. These behaviors are reliant on a specialized visual input to the posterior parietal cortex. Here, we show that normal primate reaching-and-grasping behavior depends critically on a visual pathway through the thalamic pulvinar,...
Article
Full-text available
Olfactory dysfunction is a frequent and early feature of patients with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) and is very uncommon in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Mechanisms underlying this clinical manifestation are poorly understood but the premature deposition of protein aggregat...
Article
Injury to the primary visual cortex (V1, striate cortex) and the geniculostriate pathway in adults results in cortical blindness, abolishing conscious visual perception. Early studies by Larry Weiskrantz and colleagues demonstrated that some patients with an occipital-lobe injury exhibited a degree of unconscious vision and visually-guided behaviou...
Article
The middle temporal (MT) area of the extrastriate visual cortex has long been studied in adulthood for its distinctive physiological properties and function as a part of the dorsal stream, yet interestingly possesses a similar maturation profile as the primary visual cortex (V1). Here we examined whether an early-life lesion to MT of marmoset monke...
Article
Infants and adults respond differently to brain injuries. Specifically, improved neuronal sparing along with reduced astrogliosis and glial scarring often observed earlier in life, likely contributes to improved long-term outcomes. Understanding the underlying mechanisms could enable the recapitulation of neuroprotective effects, observed in infant...
Article
Full-text available
We determined the retinal ganglion cell types projecting to the medial subdivision of inferior pulvinar (PIm) and the superior colliculus (SC) in the common marmoset monkey, Callithrix jacchus. Adult marmosets received a bidirectional tracer cocktail into the PIm (conjugated to Alexa fluor 488), and the SC (conjugated to Alexa fluor 594) using an M...
Preprint
Full-text available
The middle temporal (MT) area of the extrastriate visual cortex has long been studied in adulthood for its distinctive physiological properties and function as a part of the dorsal stream, yet interestingly possesses a similar maturation profile as the primary visual cortex (V1). Here we examined whether an early-life lesion of MT altered the dorsa...
Article
Full-text available
In rodents, innate and learned fear of predators depends on the medial hypothalamic defensive system, a conserved brain network that lies downstream of the amygdala and promotes avoidance via projections to the periaqueductal gray. Whether this network is involved in primate fear remains unknown. To address this, we provoked flight responses to a p...
Preprint
Infants and adults respond differently to brain injuries. Specifically, improved neuronal sparing along with reduced astrogliosis and glial scarring often observed earlier in life, likely contributes to improved long-term outcomes. Understanding the underlying mechanisms could enable the recapitulation of neuroprotective effects, observed in infant...
Preprint
In rodents, innate and learned fear of predators depends on the medial hypothalamic defensive system, a conserved brain network that lies downstream of the amygdala. However, it remains unknown whether this network is involved in primate fear. Here we demonstrate that visually evoked predator fear recruits a homologous medial hypothalamic defense s...
Article
Full-text available
Parkinson’s disease is characterized by motor and nonmotor symptoms that gradually appear as a consequence of the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Currently, no treatment can slow Parkinson’s disease progression. Inasmuch, there is a need to develop animal models that can be used to understand the pathop...
Article
The medial pulvinar (PM) is a multimodal associative thalamic nucleus, recently evolved in primates. PM participates in integrative and modulatory functions, including directed attention, and consistently exhibits alterations in disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. Despite essential cognitive functions, the cortical inputs to the PM have not...
Article
The cover image is based on the Research Article Unravelling the subcortical and retinal circuitry of the primate inferior pulvinar by William C. Kwan et al., DOI: 10.1002/cne.24387.
Article
Throughout the primate lineage, there is a wide diversity of prehensile capacity that is thought to stem from individual species foraging patterns. While many studies have explored primates with precise hand grips, such as higher apes, few have considered primates that lack opposition movements. The New World marmoset monkey occupies an intriguing...
Article
The primate visual brain possesses a myriad of pathways, whereby visual information originating at the retina is transmitted to multiple subcortical areas in parallel, before being relayed onto the visual cortex. The dominant retinogeniculostriate pathway has been an area of extensive study, and Vivien Casagrande's work in examining the once overlo...
Article
Full-text available
Traditional "textbook" theory suggests that the development and maturation of visual cortical areas occur as a wave from V1. However, more recent evidence would suggest that this is not the case, and the emergence of extrastriate areas occurs in a non-hierarchical fashion. This proposition comes from both physiological and anatomical studies but th...
Article
Full-text available
The existence of endogenous neural progenitors in the nigrostriatal system could represent a powerful tool for restorative therapies in Parkinson's disease. Sox-2 is a transcription factor expressed in pluripotent and adult stem cells, including neural progenitors. In the adult brain Sox-2 is expressed in the neurogenic niches. There is also widesp...
Article
Full-text available
Olfactory impairment is a common feature of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Olfactory bulb (OB) pathology in these diseases shows an increased number of olfactory dopaminergic cells, protein aggregates and dysfunction of neurotransmitter systems. Since cholin...
Data
A. Confocal images showing no staining for Sox-2 in absence of the primary antibody against Sox-2 (negative control of Sox-2 staining). Scale bar = 20 µm. B. Confocal images and an orthogonal confocal reconstruction of a z-stack showing nuclear localization of Sox-2 in the SN (the same nuclear staining was found in the striatum and in neurogenic ni...
Data
A. Double immunofluorescence images showing some Sox-2+/DCX+ cells in the SVZ. Note the weaker staining of Sox-2+/DCX+ cells comparing with other Sox-2+ cells of the SVZ (stem cells and transit amplifying progenitors). Scale bar = 20 µm. B, C Double immunofluorescence images and orthogonal confocal reconstructions of z-stacks showing Sox-2+ cells p...
Data
A. Schematic drawing of the distribution of TH+ neurons in control animals. Note that they are located close to the dorsolateral border of the striatum and the distribution is similar to that of Sox-2+/CR+ cells. B. Orthogonal confocal reconstruction of a z-stack showing a TH+ striatal cell (green) co-localized with calretinin (CR) (red). Scale bar...
Data
A. Orthogonal confocal reconstruction of a z-stack showing a CR+ striatal cell (green) co-localized with Sox-2 (red). Separate channels are shown in Fig. 4A. Scale bar = 20 µm. B. Triple immunofluorescence images showing that some Sox-2+ cells were negative for GFAP and CR (blue arrowhead). Scale bar = 20 µm. Abbreviations: calretinin: CR; glial fi...
Article
Full-text available
In addition to the medium spiny neurons the mammalian striatum contains a small population of GABAergic interneurons that are immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), which dramatically increases after lesions to the nigrostriatal pathway and striatal delivery of neurotrophic factors. The regulatory effect of levodopa (L-Dopa) on the number an...
Article
The effects of neonatal visual deafferentation on the final adult pattern of cortico-collicular connections from the rat primary somatosensory cortex barrel field were studied by injecting an anterograde tracer (BDA) into different locations of the barrel cortex. Collicular afferents originating in the barrel cortex normally end in the intermediate...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I wonder if anyone has experience using the retrograde viral vector rAAV2-retro (10.1016/j.neuron.2016.09.021) in non human primate brain
Thanks
Inaki

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The workings of the brain have long been a realm of philosophy. Yet, researchers around the world have trodden the path towards deciphering brain function in unprecedented ways either by tackling the most diverse fields of research or through bold technological innovation. The field of Neuroscience has expanded in every direction. However, a unifying, detailed depiction of how the brain is organized will only emerge by stitching knowledge together and elucidating how function at multiple scales is integrated to give rise to cognition and behavior. This Research Topic aims to provide an articulate, multi-scale view of brain function by incorporating knowledge ranging from molecular to cognitive and behavioral neuroscience. With the intent to consolidate the foundations of Neuroscience in the 21st century, we encourage the submission of original review and mini-review articles on a wide range of subtopics – genetics and neurodevelopment, neuroproteomics and metabolomics, cellular neurobiology and neuroimmunology, synaptic physiology and transmission, neural circuits and networks, neuroanatomy, cognitive neuroscience, and behavioral neuroscience. By providing a snapshot of each field, the curated collection of review articles will serve as the essential reference for a new educational platform being currently developed for the next generation of neuroscience students and researchers. This platform will encompass a state of the art neuroscience open online course, online learning and research tools, and a neuroscience book. As such, authors will gain exposure of their work over three types of open access media - the current Research Topic, a MOOC and an eBook. Aiming to place each subject matter into the broader context of brain function, contributions should include a graphic summary, a brief historical perspective, a summary of the established principles within the field of research, a critical appraisal of the current state of the art, and a highlight of future directions to be explored. https://www.frontiersin.org/research-topics/8552/fundamentals-of-21st-century-neuroscience
Project
We are currently investigating the role of the inferior pulvinar in visual cortical development and behaviour.