Imelda Udoh

Imelda Udoh
University of Uyo | UNIUYO · Department of Linguistics and Nigerian Languages

PhD Linguistics

About

14
Publications
1,269
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33
Citations
Citations since 2016
9 Research Items
16 Citations
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Introduction
Professor of linguistics and Nigerian languages, at the University of Uyo, Uyo, Nigeria. She has done extensive research on the documentation and description of Nigerian languages, and she has many publications in this area, like The Languages of Southern Nigeria: A Geopolitical profile, published in 2019.

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
Nigeria is home to over 500 languages (Ethnologue 2009), accounting for 25% of languages spoken in Africa. Most have never been documented. 28 languages are listed in the UNESCO Atlas of Endangered Languages as endangered. In addition to these indigenous languages, there are three other foreign languages: English, French and Arabic, which have beco...
Article
Full-text available
The Nigerian speech communities during the pre-colonial era were indigenous language speaking communities before English became the official language of Nigeria. At present, English has not only become the dominant language in the indigenous communities, but also the medium of instruction in schools and media. Parents in most homes, even take pride...
Article
Full-text available
Leggbo has two classes of consonants – fortis and lenis consonants. The fortis consonants are articulated with more force, and they occur in stronger contexts than the lenis consonants, which are articulated with relatively less force and are therefore found in weak environments. Following the Phonological Strength Hierarchy (Katamba 1989), stops...
Presentation
Full-text available
This lecture explores the Nigerian linguistic landscape and shows how the precious languages spoken in Nigeria can serve as bricks for building a national identity. Crucially, the idea of Nigeria’s unity in diversity is promoted, adopting an approach that can unearth the linguistic and cultural interrelationships among these languages thereby showi...
Article
Full-text available
Being a multilingual and multicultural nation, Nigeria is blessed with over 525 languages (Blench, 2014) from four different language families. The sheer number of indigenous languages makes an interesting tapestry! Unfortunately, not much attention has been paid to the study of our indigenous languages, with all the abundant prospects. This paper...
Book
Full-text available
The Languages of Southern Nigeria: A Geopolitical Profile is the 5th edition in the series and it covers the seventeen States in the three southern geopolitical zones. It presents the languages and their varieties, as well as estimates of the speakers. It also provides political maps, as a guide, which will, later on, be converted to linguistic map...
Article
Full-text available
Leggbó does not have dedicated grammatical forms that primarily encode temporal notions, which implies that it does not have 'tense' as a grammatical category. However, some aspect-mood forms have temporal implications. Like all languages, it has lexical items that refer to time and specific constructions in which they are used. In this paper, we t...
Article
Full-text available
This paper argues that the Leggbo Stop consonants /b d k  m n/ are the underlying phonemes in weak contexts. The consonants [ l w j] are 'placeholders' which synchronically provide a trace for the ghost and lost consonants that once occurred in what have become weak contexts in the language. The [], a very unstable sound is used to illustrate th...
Article
This article describes ideophones in Leggbo, a Cross River language of Nigeria. It focuses on two processes -fortition and reduplication - in the language and their special relation to ideophones. Fortition involves consonant gemination and lengthening and is used for intensification. Reduplication can be either lexical or grammatical. Ideophones c...
Article
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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The NLP provides a database of the languages of Nigeria following the six Geopolitical Zones – the South South, South East, South West, North East, North Central and North West. The Project surveys the 774 Local Government Areas (L.G.As) and presents the languages and their varieties, as well as estimates of the speakers. It provides political maps, as a guide, which will eventually be converted to a linguistic map of these Zones. It also provides a database to help the decision on a National Language Policy for Nigeria. The entire report is expected to be published under the title Languages of Nigeria. The NLP is planned in three phases: 1. Phase 1 Geopolitical profiling of the 774 Local Government Areas in the 6 Geopolitical Zones. This is the Nigerian Geopolitical Languages Survey (NGLS). 2. Phase 2 Assessment of the vitality and documentation of the languages. 3. Phase 3 Classification of the languages of Nigeria. This Project that started in 2003 is still in the Phase 1. Considering the vast area to cover, the already existing geopolitical structure is being used. The best way to address this is to use the people close to the areas where the languages are spoken. The NLP is leveraging on this structure through a network and coordination of linguists, students, speakers, institutions and funders to address the chaotic linguistic situation. Although the NLP started as a project of the University of Uyo, its national scope has attracted the attention and collaboration of the Linguistic Association of Nigeria. Indeed, most linguists who have heard about it have embraced it with much enthusiasm, a vibrant Forum has been formed where issues concerning Nigerian languages are addressed. The objectives of the NLP are to: 1. explore and document the languages of Nigeria; 2. bring together individuals/groups and institutions/funders and language stakeholders in a bid to foster understanding, partnerships, collaboration and support of issues relating to languages of Nigeria; 3. form working groups to cover all 6 geopolitical zones of Nigeria as a fall out from the presentations and to follow up on the conference themes; 4. provide a platform for sharing project ideas, problems and solutions on the documentation of the languages of Nigeria; 5. gather information on the documentation efforts across Nigeria; 6. publish volumes on the languages of Nigerian; 7. produce a linguistic map of Nigeria; 8. host a biennial conference on the languages of Nigeria.