Imadeldin E Aradaib

Veterinary Medicine, Epidemiology, Infectious Diseases

BVSc; MVSc; DVM; MPVM; PhD.
32.51

Publications

  • Source
    Dataset: abdalla
    Imadeldin E Aradaib

    Full-text · Dataset · Aug 2015
  • Source
    Alaa M. Ibrahim · Ibrahim A. Adam · Badreldin T. Osman · Imadeldin E. Aradaib
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a tick-borne disease caused by CCHF virus (CCHFV) of the genus Nairovirus in the family Bunyaviridae. CCHFV causes subclinical infection in domestic livestock and an often fatal hemorrhagic illness in humans, with approximately 30% mortality rates. In the present study, a cross-sectional serosurvey was conducted in a total of 282 randomly selected cattle from five localities in East Darfur State, Sudan. The exposure status to CCHF was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of CCHFV-specific IgG antibodies in cattle serum samples. The CCHFV-specific IgG antibodies were detected in 54 out of 282 animals, accounting for a 19.14% prevalence rate. Older cattle (>2 years of age) were approximately five times more likely to be infected with the virus (OR=4.90, CI=1.28-18.98, p-value=0.02). Heavily tick-infested cattle (ticks all over the body) were at 11 times higher at risk compared to tick-free animals (OR=11.11, CI=2.86-43.25, p-value=0.01). Grazing system is another factor affecting CCHF, where cattle grazing on open system were 27 times more at risk compared to other grazing systems (OR=27.22, CI=7.46-99.24, p-value=0.001). There was an association between localities and CCHF cattle (OR=0.24, CI=0.07-0.83, p-value=0.02). This study confirms the exposure of cattle to CCHF in East Darfur and identifies potential risk factors associated with the disease. Further epidemiological studies and improved surveillance are urgently needed to prevent a possible outbreak of CCHF among humans in the Darfur region of Sudan. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases
  • Source
    Ibrahim A Adam · Mohamed A Abdalla · Mohamed Eh Mohamed · Imadeldin E Aradaib

    Full-text · Dataset · Jul 2014
  • Source
    Ibrahim A Adam · Mohamed A Abdalla · Mohamed Eh Mohamed · Imadeldin E Aradaib
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Bluetongue virus causes febrile disease in sheep and a fatal hemorrhagic infection in North American White-tailed deer. However, in cattle the disease is typically asymptomatic and no clinical overt disease is associated with bluetongue infection. Bluetongue virus activity has been detected in Khartoum, Sennar and South Darfur states of the Sudan. Currently, no information is available in regard to previous exposure of livestock to Bluetongue virus in North Kordufan State, the largest livestock producing region in the country. The present study was conducted to determine the prevalence of bluetongue antibodies and to identify the potential risk factors associated with the presence of bluetongue antibodies among cattle in North Kordufan State, Sudan. A total of 299 bovine blood samples were collected randomly from six localities in North Kordufan State and were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of BTV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies. The serological evidence of Bluetongue virus infection was observed in 58 out of 299 cows, accounting for a 19.4 % prevalence rate among cattle in North Kordufan State. Older cattle (>2 years of age) had four times the odds to be infected with BTV compared to young cattle (OR = 4.309, CI = 1.941-9.567, p-value = 0.01). Application of preventive measures, such as spraying or dipping with insecticide protects cattle against Bluetongue infection. Application of vector control measures decreased the odds for bluetongue seropositivity by 7 times (OR = 7.408, CI = 3.111-17.637, p-value = 0.01). The results of this study indicated that age and application of routine insecticides are influential risk factors for seroprevalence of Bluetongue in cattle. Surveillance of Bluetongue virus should be extended to include other susceptible animals and to study the distribution of the insect vectors in the region to better predict and respond to BTV outbreak in the State of North Kordufan, Sudan.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · BMC Veterinary Research
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an insect-transmitted virus, which causes bluetongue disease (BT) in sheep and a fatal hemorrhagic infection in North American white-tailed deer. However, in cattle the disease is typically asymptomatic and no overt clinical signs of disease appear to be associated with BTV infection. Serological evidence and isolation of different BTV serotypes have been reported in Sudan, however, no information is currently available in regard to previous exposure of Sudanese livestock to BTV infection in East Darfur State, Sudan. To determine the prevalence of BTV antibodies and to identify the potential risk factors associated with BTV infection among cattle in East Darfur State, Sudan. A total of 224 blood samples were collected randomly from five localities in East Darfur State, Sudan. The serum samples were screened for detection of BTV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (c-ELISA). Serological evidence of BTV infection was observed in 150 out of 224 animals accounting for a 67% prevalence rate among cattle in East Darfur State. Older cattle (>2 years of age) were six times more likely to be infected with BTV (OR = 6.62, CI = 2.87-15.26, p-value = 0.01). Regarding animal source (contact with other herds) as a risk factor, it was shown that cattle purchased from market or introduced from other herds were 3 times at higher risk of being infected with BTV (OR = 3.87, CI = 1.07-13.87, p value = 0.03). Exposure of cattle to the insect vector increased the risk of contracting BTV infection by six times compared to non-exposed cattle (OR = 6.44, CI = 1.53-27.08, p value = 0.01). The present study indicated that age, animal source and the intensity of the insect vector are influential risk factors for BTV infection in cattle in the Darfur region. Surveillance for BTV infection should be extended to include other susceptible ruminants and to study the distribution of the insect vectors to better predict and respond to a possible BTV outbreak in the State of East Darfur, Sudan.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2014 · Irish Veterinary Journal
  • Imadeldin E Aradaib

    No preview · Conference Paper · Aug 2013
  • Source
    Imadeldin Aradaib · Mohamed E Ahmed

    Full-text · Conference Paper · Aug 2013
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Echinococcus granulosus (EG) complex, the cause of cystic echinococcosis (CE), infects humans and several other animal species worldwide and hence the disease is of public health importance. Ten genetic variants, or genotypes designated as (G1-G10), are distributed worldwide based on genetic diversity. The objective of this study was to provide some sequence data and phylogeny of EG isolates recovered from the Sudanese one-humped camel (Camelus dromedaries). Fifty samples of hydatid cysts were collected from the one- humped camels (Camelus dromedaries) at Taboul slaughter house, central Sudan. DNAs were extracted from protoscolices and/or associated germinal layers of hydatid cysts using a commercial kit. The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (NADH1) gene and the cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene were used as targets for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The PCR products were purified and partial sequences were generated. Sequences were further examined by sequence analysis and subsequent phylogeny to compare these sequences to those from known strains of EG circulating globally. The identity of the PCR products were confirmed as NADH1 and Cox1 nucleotide sequences using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) of NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information, Bethesda, MD). The phylogenetic analysis showed that 98% (n = 49) of the isolates clustered with Echinococcus canadensis genotype 6 (G6), whereas only one isolate (2%) clustered with Echinococcus ortleppi (G5). This investigation expands on the existing sequence data generated from EG isolates recovered from camel in the Sudan. The circulation of the cattle genotype (G5) in the one-humped camel is reported here for the first time.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2013 · BMC Veterinary Research
  • Source
    Ibrahim A Adam · Mubarak Am Mahmoud · Imadeldin E Aradaib
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF), caused by CCHF virus (CCFV), may cause a fatal hemorrhagic illness in humans with mortality rate of approximately 30%. However, in animals the disease is typically asymptomatic and no clinical hemorrhagic infections appears to be associated with CCHFV. Recently, CCHF activity has been detected in western and southern Kordufan region, Sudan. Currently, no information is available in regard to previous exposure of livestock to CCHFV infection in the region. In the present study, a seroepidemiological survey was conducted to determine the prevalence of CCHF and to identify the potential risk factors associated with the disease among cattle in North Kordufan State, Sudan. In this survey, 299 blood samples were collected randomly from six localities in North Kordufan State and were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of CCHFV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies. The result of the study indicated that the prevalence rate of CCHF was relatively high among cattle, where serological evidence of the infection was observed in 21 (7.0%) of 299 animals. Older cattle were eight times more likely to be infected with the virus (OR=8.0824, CI=1.174-66.317, p-value=0.034). Cross breeds were at 37 time higher at risk compared to endogenous breed (OR=37.06, CI=1.455-944, p-value=0.029). Highly tick-infested cattle are 6 times higher at risk for CCHF when compared to tick-free animals (OR=6.532, CI=1.042-10.852, p-value=0.030). It is recommended that surveillance of CCHF should be extended to include other ruminant animals and to study the distribution of ticks in the region to better predict and respond to CCHF outbreak in the State of North Kordufan, Sudan.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2013 · Virology Journal
  • Source
    Dataset: meahmed1

    Full-text · Dataset · May 2013
  • Source
    Dataset: Khairalla

    Full-text · Dataset · May 2013
  • Source
    Dataset: JVDI-3

    Full-text · Dataset · May 2013
  • Source

    Full-text · Dataset · May 2013
  • Source

    Full-text · Dataset · May 2013
  • Source
    Dataset: Hydatid

    Full-text · Dataset · May 2013
  • Source
    Dataset: Genetic BTV

    Full-text · Dataset · May 2013
  • Source

    Full-text · Dataset · May 2013
  • Source
    Dataset: EHDVBTV2

    Full-text · Dataset · May 2013
  • Source

    Full-text · Dataset · May 2013
  • Source

    Full-text · Dataset · May 2013

316 Following View all

263 Followers View all