Ilze Plavgo

Ilze Plavgo
European University Institute | EUI · Department of Political and Social Sciences

Ph.D. in Political and Social Sciences; MSc in Public Policy and Human Development

About

7
Publications
2,221
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100
Citations
Introduction
I am a quantitative researcher working on inequality, poverty, and social policy. I am currently a post-doctoral Research Fellow at the European University Institute (EUI) where I work in the WellSIRe project studying the potential of social investment policies to smoothen life-course transitions and reduce poverty and inequality in Europe. Prior to the EUI, I worked as a social and economic policy analyst at the UNICEF Office of Research with a research focus on poverty and child wellbeing.
Education
October 2019 - December 2019
University of Cambridge
Field of study
  • Education and Development
September 2016 - September 2020
European University Institute
Field of study
  • Political and Social Sciences
September 2016 - August 2017
European University Institute
Field of study
  • Political and Social Sciences

Publications

Publications (7)
Article
Social policy research is truly interdisciplinary with academics from very different theoretical perspectives working together in fervent open-mindedness towards diverse methodological approaches. The exploration of social investment (SI) welfare provision is a clear example of this spirit of interdisciplinary engagement, having stirred up critical...
Article
Over the past decade, the notion of ‘social investment’ (SI) has gained considerable traction in the political debates over welfare state futures. The multifaceted character of SI policy interventions, the effects of policy complementarities and interactions for different social groups and generational cohorts, and the challenge of delineating effe...
Article
Full-text available
This study provides with a first indication on the number of multidimensionally poor children in sub-Saharan Africa. It presents a methodology measuring multidimensional child deprivation within and across countries, and it is in line with the Sustainable Development Goal 1 focusing on multidimensional poverty by age and gender. Using the Multiple...
Article
Full-text available
Poverty has serious consequences for children’s well-being as well as for their achievements in adult life. The Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis for the European Union (EU-MODA) compares the living conditions of children across the EU member states. Rooted in the established multidimensional poverty measurement tradition, EU-MODA contribut...
Article
Full-text available
Poverty has serious consequences for children’s well-being as well as for their achievements in adult life. The Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis for the European Union (EU-MODA) compares the living conditions of children across the EU member states, plus Iceland and Norway. Rooted in the established multidimensional poverty measurement tra...

Network

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
As part of my doctoral studies at the European University Institute (EUI), I analyse trends in intergenerational educational inequality and study mechanisms behind inequality in educational opportunities between children of differing socioeconomic backgrounds in developing countries. In the first part of my thesis, I explore trends in association between parents’ and children’s educational attainment over the last three decades in sub-Saharan Africa, with an aim to investigate whether educational expansion has been accompanied by a reduction of intergenerational inequality in primary school outcomes. I also study the role of national contextual factors in explaining differences in educational inequality between countries and cohorts. In the second part of my thesis, I study mechanisms behind inequality in educational opportunities between children of different socioeconomic groups in low-income settings. More specifically, I analyse whether inequality in education is driven by differences in children’s cognitive ability at school entry, by differences in family choices during the first years of primary school, or by differences in school quality due to school segregation.