Ika Djukic

Ika Djukic
Institute of Ecosystem Research & Environmental Information Management · Environment Agency Austria

Mag.Dr.

About

61
Publications
38,902
Reads
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1,369
Citations
Introduction
My professional background is in the interdisciplinary understanding of ecosystem processes in changing environment with main areas of expertise in vegetation ecology (Master degree, University of Vienna) and biogeochemistry (PhD, BOKU Vienna & Columbia University, New York). During my post-doctoral research I have been engaged in the study of biogeochemical process in alpine ecosystems in tropical forests in Australia and Mediterranean grasslands (BOKU, Vienna) as well as in the study of the ef
Additional affiliations
June 2016 - June 2016
Hokkaido University
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • ILTER-Nitrogen Initiative International Training Cours
January 2014 - present
Institute of Ecosystem Research & Environmental Information Management
Position
  • Researcher
July 2013 - May 2016
Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
July 2009 - January 2010
Columbia University in the City of New York
Field of study
  • Soil ecology
September 2006 - September 2011
October 1998 - November 2004
University of Vienna
Field of study
  • Ecology

Publications

Publications (61)
Article
Soil fungi, as a major decomposer of organic matter, govern carbon (C) cycle and act as crucial regulators of the soil C and nutrient balance in terrestrial ecosystems. Climate change and parent material alter important environmental conditions that may affect fungal community. However, very little is known about the diversity and community structu...
Article
Full-text available
Plant community biomass production is co‐dependent on climatic and edaphic factors that are often covarying and non‐independent. Disentangling how these factors act in isolation is challenging, especially along large climatic gradients that can mask soil effects. As anthropogenic pressure increasingly alters local climate and soil resource supply u...
Article
Litter decomposition is a key process for carbon and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems and is mainly controlled by environmental conditions, substrate quantity and quality as well as microbial community abundance and composition. In particular, the effects of climate and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on litter decomposition and its t...
Article
Full-text available
Litter decomposition is a key process for carbon and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems and is mainly controlled by environmental conditions, substrate quantity and quality as well as microbial community abundance and composition. In particular, the effects of climate and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on litter decomposition and its t...
Article
Litter decomposition is a key process for carbon and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems and is mainly controlled by environmental conditions, substrate quantity and quality as well as microbial community abundance and composition. In particular, the effects of climate and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on litter decomposition and its t...
Article
Litter decomposition is a key process for carbon and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems and is mainly controlled by environmental conditions, substrate quantity and quality as well as microbial community abundance and composition. In particular, the effects of climate and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on litter decomposition and its t...
Article
Full-text available
Litter decomposition is a key process for carbon and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems and is mainly controlled by environmental conditions, substrate quantity and quality as well as microbial community abundance and composition. In particular, the effects of climate and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on litter decomposition and its t...
Article
Full-text available
Litter decomposition is a key process for carbon and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems and is mainly controlled by environmental conditions, substrate quantity, and quality as well as microbial community abundance and composition. In particular, the effects of climate and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on litter decomposition and its...
Article
Predicted increase in climate warming will affect soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics in vulnerable cold alpine environments. In contrast to freeze and thaw cycles, less is known about the effects of temperature regimes in the range between 2 and 10 °C on SOC availability to soil microorganisms. For this reason, CO2 efflux, extracellular enzyme acti...
Article
Microbial necromass is an important part of soil organic carbon (SOC), but the changes in its contribution along elevational gradients and soil types are poorly understood. At two sites, the alkaline site Hochschwab and the acidic site Rauris, soil samples from three elevation levels and depths were analysed for amino sugars as microbial necromass...
Article
Wetland ecosystems are critical to the regulation of the global carbon cycle, and there is a high demand for data to improve carbon sequestration and emission models and predictions. Decomposition of plant litter is an important component of ecosystem carbon cycling, yet a lack of knowledge on decay rates in wetlands is an impediment to predicting...
Article
Full-text available
Plant community biomass production is co-dependent on climatic and edaphic factors that are often covarying and non-independent. Disentangling how these factors act in isolation is challenging, especially along large climatic gradients that can mask soil effects. As anthropogenic pressure increasingly alters local climate and soil resource supply u...
Article
Full-text available
Excess nitrogen (N) deposition and gaseous N emissions from industrial, domestic, and agricultural sources have led to increased nitrate leaching, the loss of biological diversity, and has affected carbon (C) sequestration in forest ecosystems. Nitrate leaching affects the purity of karst water resources, which contribute around 50% to Austria’s dr...
Article
Full-text available
In light of increasing anthropogenic pressures on ecosystems around the globe, the question how biodiversity change of organisms in the critical zone between Earth’s canopies and bedrock relates to ecosystem functions is an urgent issue, as human life relies on these functions. Particularly, soils play vital roles in nutrient cycling, promotion of...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is a worldwide threat to biodiversity and ecosystem structure, functioning, and services. To understand the underlying drivers and mechanisms, and to predict the consequences for nature and people, we urgently need better understanding of the direction and magnitude of climate‐change impacts across the soil–plant–atmosphere continuum...
Article
Full-text available
Litter and soil organic matter decomposition represents one of the major drivers of carbon and nutrient cycling in a given ecosystem; however, it also contributes to a significant production of relevant greenhouse gasses. The Japanese archipelago spans several biomes (boreal‐temperate‐subtropical) and covers a large range of elevations and ecosyste...
Article
Human-induced environmental changes in temperature, light availability due to forest canopy management, nitrogen deposition, and land-use legacies can alter ecosystem processes such as litter decomposition. These influences can be both direct and indirect via altering the performance of understorey vegetation. To identify the direct and indirect ef...
Article
The distribution of microbial biomass and residues and their role in carbon (C) dynamics within soil aggregate fractions in the Alps are still poorly explored. We assessed the distribution of bacterial and fungal residues and their impact on the contribution of the microbial community to C dynamics within soil aggregate size fractions at different...
Article
Changes in soil fungal biomass ergosterol, microbial biomass and their role in soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics along elevation and depth gradients in the Alps are still poorly explored. We investigated changes in stocks of SOC, total N, microbial biomass C (MBC) and N (MBN) and fungal biomass ergosterol at different elevation levels (low, mid an...
Article
Full-text available
Through litter decomposition enormous amounts of carbon is emitted to the atmosphere. Numerous large-scale decomposition experiments have been conducted focusing on this fundamental soil process in order to understand the controls on the terrestrial carbon transfer to the atmosphere. However, previous studies were mostly based on site-specific litt...
Article
Full-text available
Since its founding in 1993 the International Long-term Ecological Research Network (ILTER) has gone through pronounced development phases. The current network comprises 44 active member LTER networks representing 700 LTER Sites and ~ 80 LTSER Platforms across all continents, active in the fields of ecosystem, critical zone and socio-ecological rese...
Article
Full-text available
Through litter decomposition enormous amount of carbon is emitted to the atmosphere. Numerous large-scale decomposition experiments have been conducted focusing on this fundamental soil process in order to understand the controls on the terrestrial carbon transfer to the atmosphere. However, previous studies were mostly based on site-specific litte...
Article
Full-text available
Through litter decomposition enormous amount of carbon is emitted to the atmosphere. Numerous large-scale decomposition experiments have been conducted focusing on this fundamental soil process in order to understand the controls on the terrestrial carbon transfer to the atmosphere. However, previous studies were mostly based on site-specific litte...
Article
Full-text available
Through litter decomposition enormous amounts of carbon is emitted to the atmosphere. Numerous large-scale decomposition experiments have been conducted focusing on this fundamental soil process in order to under-stand the controls on the terrestrial carbon transfer to the atmosphere. However, previous studies were mostly based on site-specific litt...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change and excess deposition of airborne nitrogen (N) are among the main stressors to floristic biodiversity. One particular concern is the deterioration of valuable habitats such as those protected under the European Habitat Directive. In future, climate-driven shifts (and losses) in the species potential distribution, but also N driven nu...
Data
Site- and scenario-specific effects of climate change and N deposition. (PDF)
Data
List of all distinctive plant species for the study sites. (PDF)
Data
Methods used for soil and climate input data for VSD+. (PDF)
Data
Future changes at the site level. (PDF)
Data
Methods and results for forest growth. (PDF)
Data
Future changes in the occurrence probability of plant species. (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
Nitrogen (N) cycle processes in terrestrial ecosystems are highly sensitive to temperature and soil moisture variations. Thus, future climate change may affect the degree to which N deposited from the atmosphere will be retained in forest ecosystems. We evaluated the effect of future changes in climate and N deposition on ecosystem N cycling using...
Article
Full-text available
Climate warming is shifting the elevational boundary between forests and tundra upwards, but the related belowground responses are poorly understood. In the pristine South and Polar Urals with shifts of the treeline ecotone documented by historical photographs, we investigated fine root dynamics and production of extramatrical mycorrhizal mycelia (...
Article
Full-text available
Decomposition of plant litter is a key process for the transfer of carbon and nutrients in ecosystems. Carbon contained in the decaying biomass is released to the atmosphere as respired CO 2 , and may contribute to global warming. Litterbag studies have been used to improve our knowledge of the drivers of litter decomposition, but they lack compara...
Article
Full-text available
Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for all biota, but in excess behaves as a pollutant in the environment. The doubling of total reactive nitrogen (nitrogen not in the form of N 2 gas) pools globally has resulted in many undesirable changes in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The International Long-Term Ecological Research (ILTER) network, a glob...
Article
The farming practices in vineyards vary widely, but how does this affect vineyard soils? The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of vineyard management practices on soil organic matter and the soil microbial community. To this end, we investigated three adjacent vineyards in the Traisen valley, Austria, of which the soils had d...
Article
Full-text available
Litter decomposition is an important process for cycling of nutrients in terrestrial ecosystems. The objective of this study was to evaluate direct and indirect effects of climate on litter decomposition along an altitudinal gradient in a temperate Alpine region. Foliar litter of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Black pine (Pinus nigra) was inc...
Research
Temperate forests provide favorable conditions for carbonate bedrock weathering as the soil CO2 partial pressure is high and soil water is regularly available. As a result of weathering, abiotic CO2 can be released and contribute to the soil CO2 efflux. We used the distinct isotopic signature of the abiotic CO2 to estimate its contribution to the t...
Article
Full-text available
Temperate forests provide favorable conditions for carbonate bedrock weathering as the soil CO2 partial pressure is high and soil water is regularly available. As a result of weathering, abiotic CO2 can be released and contribute to the soil CO2 efflux. We used the distinct isotopic signature of the abiotic CO2 to estimate its contribution to the t...
Article
Full-text available
Temperate forests provide favorable conditions for carbonate bedrock weathering as the soil CO2 partial pressure is high and soil water is regularly available. As a result of weathering, abiotic CO2 can be released and contribute to the soil CO2 efflux. We used the distinct isotopic signature of the abiotic CO2 to estimate its contribution to the t...
Article
Lignin is an aromatic plant compound which decomposes more slowly than other organic matter compounds; however, it was recently shown that lignin could decompose as fast as litter bulk carbon in minerals soils. In alpine Histosols, where organic matter dynamics is largely unaffected by mineral constituents, lignin may be an important part of soil o...
Conference Paper
Plant communities are closely associated with distinct soil microbial communities by controlling available soil carbon, temperature and water content. In the Eastern North America forests, genus Quercus (Oak) represents one of the foundation tree taxa. However, the future of oak forests is uncertain as forests are impacted by events such as insect...
Conference Paper
Microorganisms are well known to be more sensitive to changes in environmental conditions than to other soil chemical and physical parameters. However, the consequences of the on-going warming of montane ecosystems on microorganisms and the processes they mediate are still not well understood. In addition, different terrestrial ecosystems comprise...
Article
Full-text available
Litter decomposition represents one of the largest fluxes in the global terrestrial carbon cycle. The aim of this study was to improve our understanding of the factors governing decomposition in alpine ecosystems and how their responses to changing environmental conditions change over time. Our study area stretches over an elevation gradient of 100...
Article
Litter decomposition is an important process in global carbon (C) and nutrient cycles. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of climate on litter decomposition along an altitudinal gradient in a temperate Alpine region, and to characterize the decompositional stages of the litter material with Fourier-transform mid-infrared spectrosc...
Article
Keywords: Mid-infrared spectroscopy FT-IR spectroscopy Forest soils and types Canonical discriminant function Inorganic and organic carbon Nitrogen When forest soils are investigated, the identification of litter and soil layers is a key step. Mid-infrared spectroscopy seems to be promising for this due to its capability to provide fingerprint info...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change affects a variety of soil properties and processes. Alpine soils take an extraordinary position in this context because of the vulnerability of mountain regions to climatic changes. We used altitudinal soil translocation to simulate the combined effects of changing climatic conditions and shifting vegetation zones in order to study s...
Article
Mountain regions are known to be especially vulnerable to climatic changes; however, informa-tion on the climate sensitivity of alpine ecosystems is still scarce to date. In this study, we investi-gate the impacts of climate and vegetation composition on soil organic-matter (SOM) stocks and characteristics along an elevation gradient (900 to 1900 m...
Article
a b s t r a c t In alpine environments, climate change may alter vegetation composition as well as the quantity and quality of plant litter, which in turn may affect microbial community composition and functioning. In this study, we analyzed soil microbial community composition and its activity along a vegetation gradient (900e1900 m above sea leve...
Conference Paper
Soil climosequences are, by definition, sequences of soils whose variations are caused by differences in climatic conditions. In the real world, vegetation almost always co-varies along climatic gradients. Therefore, most soil climosequences are implicitly also vegetation-sequences. Here, we report results from three soil climosequence studies alon...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (9)
Project
The Swiss Long-term Ecological Network is a set of highly instrumented research platforms (LWF-sites). It is designed to collect, store, manage, analyse and interpret long-term data based on a set of key physical, chemical and biological variables, which drive and respond to environmental changes. Its mission is to improve our understanding of how natural and anthropogenic stresses affect forest ecosystems in the long term, and which risks for humans are involved. The 19 forest sites (established in 1994) are part of the "International Co-operative Programme on Assessment and Monitoring of Air Pollution Effects on Forests" (ICP-Forests). In addition, the subalpine site Seehornwald-Davos is part of the Integrated Carbon Observing System (ICOS) with the class 1 label. The natural Sots pine stand at Pfynwald, is providing a long-term experimental research platform where precipitation is being manipulated since 2003. Using a network of selected study sites, we monitor the long-term responses of forest ecosystem components and processes to stress factors such as atmospheric deposition, changing climate and weather extremes. The data are stored in a central database and are available through a variety of data access methods. More infos can be found at https://www.elter-ri.eu/
Project
Although elevational patterns of diversity for plants and animals are well established, the knowledge about the variability in soil fungal community across elevation gradients is very little. The objective of the proposed study is to understand how climate change induced shifts in community structure, biomass and residues of soil fungi could explain the organic matter turnover as well as carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics along alpine elevation and depth gradients. In a first step, the key role of fine root biomass, belowground C allocation to terrestrial ecosystem C cycle associated with climate change will be determined. In a second step, spatial patterns of soil microbial community structure will be identified along with the combination of abiotic and/or biotic factors which drive this variation. In a third step, investigation on how qualitative and quantitative contribution of fungi to soil C and N dynamics varies across elevation gradients will be carried-out. Finally, field scale relationship between soil fungal community structure and ecosystem services will be evaluated.
Project
The Horizon 2020 project “eLTER” (European Long-Term Ecosystem and socio-ecological Research Infrastructure) started in June 2015. For clear identification, we use the short name “eLTER H2020”. eLTER H2020, which runs until 2019, will serve as the flagship for the further development of the Long-term Ecosystem Research infrastructure and community in Europe. eLTER H2020 will closely interact with two other major elements in this effort: eLTER ESFRI process, a formalization process in the framework of the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (eLTER was recently accepted as an “emerging ESFRI infrastructure”) LTER-Europe network of national networks (25 countries with a pool of around 400 LTER Sites and 35 LTSER Platforms). LTER-Europe is the formal European regional group of the global ILTER network. It provides multiple networking activities with permanent governance structures. The specific role of eLTER H2020 is to catalyze conceptual and service developments of a distributed, highly integrated and widely used research infrastructure to support a wide range of ecosystem and critical zone research questions, such as: How are ecosystems and biodiversity changing or adapting to global-change stresses? What are the determinants of ecosystem resilience? What are the threshold interactions resulting in system shifts? How can we respond locally, nationally and internationally to support systems that are more resilient to global change effects?