Ignazio Ziano

Ignazio Ziano
Grenoble École de Management | GEM · Department of Marketing

Phd

About

63
Publications
47,052
Reads
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344
Citations
Introduction
Ignazio Ziano currently works at the Department of Marketing, Grenoble Ecole de Management. His research focuses on judgment and decision making and consumer behavior.
Additional affiliations
September 2018 - present
Grenoble École de Management
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
November 2014 - August 2018
Ghent University
Position
  • PhD Student
March 2014 - November 2014
Università degli Studi di Torino
Position
  • Research Intern
Education
September 2012 - November 2014
Università degli Studi di Torino
Field of study
  • Work and organizational psychology
September 2009 - July 2012
Università degli Studi di Torino
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (63)
Preprint
Full-text available
The identified victim effect is the phenomenon that people tend to contribute more to identified victims than to unidentified victims. Kogut and Ritov (2005a) found that the identified victim effect was limited to a single victim and driven by empathic emotions. In a pre-registered experiment with an online U.S. American Amazon MTurk sample (N = 20...
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Consumers’ portion size choices are important, both as larger portion sizes can lead to overeating and as uneaten portions can contribute to food waste. Existing research has largely focused on consumers’ portion size choices for themselves—even though consumers often choose for others. Fourteen studies examine portion size choices for others, test...
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Ten preregistered studies (N = 3,001) with French, British, and U.S. American participants investigated people’s social prototypes for victims of workplace harassment. We found people imagined victims of workplace harassment in physically, socially, psychologically, politically, and economically different ways compared to non-victims: e.g., as less...
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Consumers have access to information about workers' satisfaction through a variety of means (media, word-of mouth, specialized websites). How does this affect their consumer behavior? Seven preregistered studies (with British and U.S. American participants, total N = 3057) show that consumers expect companies with more satisfied workers to produce...
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Quality and price expectations are a central issue for marketers and consumer psychologists alike. Seven experiments (N = 3626, with U.S. American, British, and French participants) show that consumers expect and perceive products to be of higher quality and price when made by well-paid workers, compared to both low-wage workers and to companies of...
Article
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Significance Communicating in ways that motivate engagement in social distancing remains a critical global public health priority during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study tested motivational qualities of messages about social distancing (those that promoted choice and agency vs. those that were forceful and shaming) in 25,718 people in 89 countries...
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This paper investigates the content and the consequences of the prototypes of the depressed. Twelve preregistered studies (total N = 4573, with U.S. American, British, and French participants) show that laypeople consider depressed people as having specific psychological, social, and physical features compared to people described as non-depressed o...
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Consumers often have to make divisions to evaluate attributes. In seven experiments (total N = 3841, six preregistered), this research shows how spontaneous anchors bias divisions. That is, consumers will recruit typical values of the attribute from memory and use them as priors when dividing. This process biases consumers’ judgments and subsequent...
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People strive to be liked by others, and likability has profound effects on various life domains such as relationships and career success. Eight experiments (seven preregistered; total N = 2587) involving Western and Asian samples show that people providing ambiguous (i.e., vague, imprecise) responses to questions are seen as less likable compared...
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Do people imagine ostracized individuals a certain way and are they perceived differently depending on their conformity to this prototype? This was investigated in five main and five supplementary studies (all preregistered; total N = 3789) which showed that people imagine ostracized individuals as socially, psychologically, and physically differen...
Article
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We report a consistent effect in the evaluation of actions: later actions – specifically, actions that are closer to a final, positive outcome - are considered as contributing more to that outcome, compared to earlier actions. Twelve experiments (total n = 5658, six pre-registered, with U.S. American and British participants, manipulating action ti...
Article
Consumers often have to make divisions to evaluate attributes. In seven experiments (total N = 3841, six preregistered), this research shows how spontaneous anchors bias divisions. That is, consumers will recruit typical values of the attribute from memory and use them as priors when dividing. This process biases consumers’ judgments and subsequent...
Article
Full-text available
Personality inferences are fundamental to human social interactions and have far-reaching effects on various social decisions. Fourteen experiments (13 preregistered; total N = 5160; using audio, video, and text stimuli) involving British, U.S. American, Singaporean, and Australian participants show that people responding to a question immediately...
Preprint
Full-text available
Kruger, Wirtz, van Boven, and Altermatt (2004) described the effort heuristic as the tendency to evaluate the quality and the monetary value of an object as higher if the production of that object was perceived as involving more effort. We attempted two preregistered replications (total N = 1405; U.S. American participants from MTurk and Prolific)...
Article
Full-text available
Five experiments (total n = 2422, with U.S. American and French participants, four preregistered) show that people are more likely to use median salaries rather than CEO-median employee compensation ratios when making inequality and fairness judgments based on company compensation data. In separate evaluation of companies, we find no significant im...
Article
Full-text available
The phenomenon that contemplating future events elicits stronger emotions than contemplating past events has been coined “temporal value asymmetry” (TVA) (Caruso et al. 2008). We conducted very close replications of three experiments derived from two influential TVA papers: Studies 1 and 4 in Caruso et al. (2008), demonstrating TVA in monetary valu...
Preprint
Full-text available
We report a consistent effect in the evaluation of actions: later actions – specifically, actions that are closer to a final, positive outcome - are considered as contributing more to that outcome, compared to earlier actions. Twelve experiments (total n = 5658, six pre-registered, with U.S. American and British participants, manipulating action ti...
Preprint
Full-text available
The phenomenon that contemplating future events elicits stronger emotions than contemplating ‎past events has been coined "temporal value asymmetry (TVA)” (Caruso et al. 2008). We ran ‎very close replications of three experiments derived from two influential TVA papers: Studies ‎‎1 and 4 in Caruso et al. (2008), demonstrating TVA in monetary valuat...
Article
Dubois, Rucker, and Galinsky (2012, Experiment 1) found that consumers view larger-size options as a signal of higher status. We conducted a close replication of this finding (N = 415), and observed a nonsignificant effect in the opposite direction (small vs. large product size: doriginal = 1.49, 95%CI [1.09, 1.89], dreplication = 0.09 95%CI [-0.15...
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In this comment, we highlight a difference of opinion with "Mertens, S., Herberz, M., Hahnel, U. J., & Brosch, T. (2022). The effectiveness of nudging: A meta-analysis of choice architecture interventions across behavioral domains. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 119(1)."
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Most global inequality is between-countries, but inequality perceptions have mostly been investigated within-country. Five studies (total N = 2149, four preregistered) show that Westerners (U.S. American, British, and French participants) believe that developing and middle-income countries’ GDP per capita is much closer to developed countries’ than...
Article
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Royzman and Baron (2002) demonstrated that people prefer indirect harm to direct harm: ‎they judge actions that produce harm as a by-product to be more moral than actions that ‎produce harm directly. In two preregistered studies, we successfully replicated Study 2 of ‎Royzman and Baron (2002) with a Hong Kong student sample (N = 46) and an online ‎...
Article
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Is it better to save 4500 lives out of 11,000 or 4500 lives out of 250,000? Fetherstonhaugh et al. (1997) showed that people prefer the former: to save lives if they are a higher proportion of the total, a phenomenon they termed “psychophysical numbing”. We attempted to replicate Studies 1 and 2 of Fetherstonhaugh et al. (1997) (5 data collections,...
Article
Consumers tend to see themselves in a positive light, yet we present evidence that they are pessimistic about whether they will receive a product’s benefits. In 15 studies (N = 6,547; including nine preregistered), we found that consumers believe that product efficacy is higher for others than it is for themselves. For example, consumers believe th...
Preprint
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Is it better to save 4,500 lives out of 11,000 or 4,500 lives out of 250,000? Fetherstonhaugh ‎et al. (1997) showed that people prefer the former: to save lives if they are a higher ‎proportion of the total, a phenomenon they termed “psychophysical numbing”. We ‎attempted to replicate Studies 1 and 2 of Fetherstonhaugh et al. (1997) (5 data collect...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has increased negative emotions and decreased positive emotions globally. Left unchecked, these emotional changes might have a wide array of adverse impacts. To reduce negative emotions and increase positive emotions, we tested the effectiveness of reappraisal, an emotion-regulation strategy that modifies how one thinks about...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has increased negative emotions and decreased positive emotions globally. Left unchecked, these emotional changes might have a wide array of adverse impacts. To reduce negative emotions and increase positive emotions, we tested the effectiveness of reappraisal, an emotion-regulation strategy that modifies how one thinks about...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has increased negative emotions and decreased positive emotions globally. Left unchecked, these emotional changes might have a wide array of adverse impacts. To reduce negative emotions and increase positive emotions, we tested the effectiveness of reappraisal, an emotion-regulation strategy that modifies how one thinks about...
Preprint
Full-text available
Personality inferences are fundamental to human social interactions and have far-reaching effects on various social decisions. Eleven experiments (10 preregistered; total N = 4512; using audio, video, and text stimuli) involving British, U.S. American, Singaporean, and Australian participants show that people responding to a question immediately (v...
Article
Full-text available
We propose that perceptions of auditory loudness and interpersonal closeness are bidirectionally related. Across 12 experiments (total N = 2,219; 10 preregistered; with Singaporean, British, U.S. American, and Australian participants), we demonstrated that louder audio made people feel physically (Study 1a) and socially (Study 1b) closer to others,...
Preprint
In nine experiments (total N = 2107, with British, French, and U.S. American participants), this paper proposes and tests a social perception theory of the endowment effect. First, the authors show that buyers are more likely to focus on themselves, and that sellers are more likely to focus on buyers. Then, the authors show that the endowment effec...
Preprint
Full-text available
In nine experiments (total N = 2107, with British, French, and U.S. American participants), this paper proposes and tests a social perception theory of the endowment effect. First, the authors show that buyers are more likely to focus on themselves, and that sellers are more likely to focus on buyers. Then, the authors show that the endowment effec...
Preprint
Full-text available
We propose that perceptions of auditory loudness and interpersonal closeness are bidirectionally related. Across 12 experiments (total N = 2219; 10 preregistered; with Singaporean, British, U.S. American, Indian, and Australian participants), we demonstrated that louder audio made people feel physically (Study 1a) and socially (Study 1b) closer to...
Preprint
Consumers often have to make divisions to evaluate attributes. In six experiments (total N = 3296, four preregistered), this research shows that consumers may rely on their prior for the attribute to generate an estimate rather than divide following a normative procedure. That is, consumers will recruit typical values of the attribute from memory a...
Article
Full-text available
Evaluating other people's sincerity is a ubiquitous and important part of social interactions. Fourteen experiments (total N = 7,565; 10 preregistered; 11 in the main article, three in the online supplemental materials; with U.S. American and British members of the public, and French students) show that response speed is an important cue on which p...
Preprint
Full-text available
In this paper (n= 611, three experiments, with U.S. Americans participants), we examine how individuals perceive their own adherence to the social distancing protocol in relation to others. We show that people believe that that they are more likely to social distance than others are, because they believe that they are more likely to follow expert a...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper (n= 611, three experiments, with U.S. Americans participants), we examine how individuals perceive their own adherence to the social distancing protocol in relation to others. We show that people believe that that they are more likely to social distance than others are, because they believe that they are more likely to follow expert a...
Article
Full-text available
Shafir, Diamond, and Tversky (1997) described money illusion as people’s inclination to ‎think of money without taking inflation sufficiently into account, i.e., in nominal terms ‎rather than in real terms. We successfully replicated Problems 1 to 4 of Shafir, Diamond, ‎and Tversky’s study (1997) on money illusion (MTurk; N = 604). We found effect...
Preprint
Full-text available
Evaluating other people’s sincerity is a ubiquitous and important part of social interactions. Fourteen experiments (total N = 7565; ten preregistered; eleven in the main paper, three in the SOM; with U.S. American and British members of the public, and French students) show that response speed is an important cue on which people base their sinceri...
Article
Full-text available
Does uncertainty about an outcome influence decisions? The sure-thing principle (Savage, 1954) posits that it should not, but Tversky and Shafir (1992) found that people regularly violate it in hypothetical gambling and vacation decisions, a phenomenon they termed “disjunction effect”. Very close replications and extensions of Tversky and Shafir (1...
Article
Full-text available
People tend to regard themselves as better than average. We conducted a replication and ‎extension of Alicke's (1985) classic study on trait dimensions in evaluations of self versus ‎others with U.S. American MTurk workers in two waves (total N = 1573; 149 total traits). ‎We successfully replicated the trait desirability effect, such that participa...
Preprint
Full-text available
Hundreds of studies have shown that consumers tend to see themselves in the bestpossible light, yet we present evidence that consumers have a surprisingly glum perspective on receiving a product’s claimed effects. In 10 studies (N = 3,825; including 8 pre-registered), we found that consumers believe that product efficacy is higher for others than i...
Preprint
Full-text available
People tend to regard themselves as better than average. We conducted a replication and ‎extension of Alicke's (1985) classic study on trait dimensions in evaluations of self versus ‎others with U.S. American MTurk workers in two waves (total N = 1573; 149 total traits). ‎We successfully replicated the trait desirability effect, such that participa...
Preprint
Dubois, Rucker, and Galinsky (2012, Experiment 1) found that consumers view larger-size options as a signal of higher status. We conducted a close replication of this finding (N = 415, MTurk), and observed a non-significant effect in the opposite direction (small product size – large product size, original d = 1.49, 95% CI [1.09, 1.89], replication...
Preprint
Full-text available
Eight studies (total N = 1962) show that consumers believe that cultural products that took a higher amount of effort to produce are going to make them feel emotionally worse-off after consumption. This effect is especially stronger when considering the author's mood when composing the work, and counteracts the effort heuristic (Kruger, Wirtz, Van...
Preprint
Full-text available
Dubois, Rucker, and Galinsky (2012, Experiment 1) found that consumers view larger-size options as a signal of higher status. We conducted a close replication of this finding (N = 415, MTurk), and observed a non-significant effect in the opposite direction (small product size-medium product size, original d = 1.49, 95% CI [1.09, 1.89], replication...
Preprint
Full-text available
The ownership effect is the phenomenon that owning an object increases liking and ‎perceived value of that object (Beggan, 1992). We conducted close replications of three ‎ownership effect experiments using different paradigms in two data collections (MTurk, ‎total n = 1312). We successfully replicated Nuttin’s (1987) name-letter effect with ‎parti...
Article
Full-text available
The ownership effect is the phenomenon that owning an object increases liking and ‎perceived value of that object (Beggan, 1992). We conducted close replications of three ‎ownership effect experiments using different paradigms in two data collections (MTurk, ‎total n = 1312). We successfully replicated Nuttin’s (1987) name-letter effect with ‎parti...
Preprint
Full-text available
Shafir, Diamond and Tversky (1997) described money illusion as people’ inclination to ‎think of money without taking inflation sufficiently into account, i.e., in nominal terms ‎rather than in real terms. We successfully replicated Problems 1 to 4 of Shafir, Diamond and ‎Tversky’s study (1997) on money illusion (MTurk; N = 604). We found effect siz...
Preprint
Full-text available
We conducted a very close replication of the disjunction effect first introduced by Tversky ‎and Shafir (1992) (N = 890). The target article demonstrated the effect using two paradigms ‎in a between-subject design, and we added an extension also testing a within-subject design, ‎with design being randomly assigned. Our results were consistent with...
Preprint
Full-text available
How does speed of response influence an individual’s standing and reputation? Five experiments (n = 1,544) demonstrate that “time-takers” are perceived to be high in status but low in competence and warmth, making them important jerks. Despite being a socially dispreferred norm violation, an intentionally slower response to an interpersonal request...
Preprint
How does speed of response influence an individual’s standing and reputation? Five experiments (n = 1,544) demonstrate that “time-takers” are perceived to be high in status but low in competence and warmth, making them important jerks. Despite being a socially dispreferred norm violation, an intentionally slower response to an interpersonal request...
Preprint
Royzman and Baron (2002) demonstrated that people prefer indirect harm to direct harm: they judge actions that produce harm as a by-product to be more moral than actions that produce harm directly. In two preregistered studies, we successfully replicated Study 2 of Royzman and Baron (2002) with a Hong Kong student sample (N = 45) and an online Amer...
Preprint
Full-text available
Six experiments (total n = 3,552, four preregistered, three incentivized) show that consumers believe similar others would use the same products more often and would find them more useful than they themselves would. Overestimation of usefulness of the same product to others is caused by the overestimation of other people’s materialism: we find that...
Preprint
Five experiments (total n = 2422, with U.S. American and French participants, four preregistered) show that people are more likely to use median salaries rather than CEO-median employee compensation ratios when making inequality and fairness judgments based on company compensation data. In separate evaluation of companies, we find no significant im...
Preprint
Royzman and Baron (2002) demonstrated that people prefer indirect harm to direct harm: ‎they judge actions that produce harm as a by-product to be more moral than actions that ‎produce harm directly. In two preregistered studies, we successfully replicated Study 2 of ‎Royzman and Baron (2002) with a Hong Kong student sample (N = 45) and an online ‎...
Article
Observers infer consumers' values and personality from their consumption behaviors. Recent literature highlights the benefits of minority consumption, typically by comparing several qualitatively different options. In seven studies (total N = 1555; one pre-registered), the current research instead compares inferences derived from the acquisition of...
Preprint
Full-text available
Observers infer consumers’ values and personality from their consumption behaviors. Recent literature highlights the benefits of minority consumption, typically by comparing several qualitatively different options. In seven studies (total N=1,555; one pre-registered), the current research instead compares inferences derived from the acquisition of...
Article
Full-text available
In response to recommendations to redefine statistical significance to P ≤ 0.005, we propose that researchers should transparently report and justify all choices they make when designing a study, including the alpha level.
Article
Full-text available
In response to recommendations to redefine statistical significance to P ≤ 0.005, we propose that researchers should transparently report and justify all choices they make when designing a study, including the alpha level.
Preprint
Full-text available
In response to recommendations to redefine statistical significance to p ≤ .005, we propose that researchers should transparently report and justify all choices they make when designing a study, including the alpha level.

Questions

Questions (7)
Question
I'm looking to measure people's belief that a piece of culture is either highbrow (intellectual) or lowbrow (popular). To this point, however, I have yet to find a complete definition listing the features a highbrow or lowbrow piece should have. Any help from any source and approach is welcome.
Question
I'm specifically looking for papers where the expectations are manipulated (e.g. "this test is going to be very difficult" vs "very easy") and ultimately influence results. I'm already aware of all the literature on stereotype-based performance change (e.g. Levy, 1996; Aronson,1999), but I am looking for other kinds of manipulations. Thanks to anybody who'll help me!
Question
Has anybody tried to operationalize Bourdieu's concepts of economic, social and cultural capital? Such as that it can be parts of experiments. I seem to only find sociological accounts of that, but no measures.
Question
E.g.: the number of statuses and comments I can download at once from my contacts (after they gave me permission through an app or in another way). I can't seem to find anything of sort in the Terms and Conditions (I don't speak legalese). Any help or useful link could be appreciated. Cheers :)
Question
I'm talking about things like themes, but also cooccorrencies count etc. I can't seem to find any literature.
Question
Does anybody know which are anxiety and stress predictors in language production (such as text corpora etc.)? I can't seem to find them anywhere.
Question
I want to set up a simple facebook app that lets the user upload content and then asks them a couple of questions. I'd also like suggestions for an app that lets you take a test and gives you a result you can share. Thanks!

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Projects

Projects (2)
Archived project
Project
See http://mgto.org/pre-registered-replications/ Projects: https://osf.io/5z4a8/ In 2016, following recent developments in psychological science (the so-called “replication crisis”) and gaining my academic independence, I decided to make serious changes to my research agenda to prioritize pre-registered replications and focus on the realm of judgment and decision making. The aim was to revisit research findings I once took for granted and re-establish the foundations on which I hope to build my research. I, therefore, decided that all my teaching and mentoring work with guided thesis students will involve pre-registered replications or pre-registered meta-analyses, to examine the classics in the field. In 2017 I guided 3 masters students at Maastricht University to pre-test this realignment. It far exceeded my expectations. We completed 3 pre-registered replication, 3 pre-registered meta-analyses, and one review paper summarizing the insights gained. Once joining HKU, in 2018, I decided to scale up and mass-mobilize HKU’s undergraduate students and lead a mass pre-registered replication effort. In the first year, two semesters, of running this project, we’ve successfully completed 45 replication projects, making this one of the largest replication efforts in social-psychology. For each of the replication projects, we have full pre-registrations, data/code, and all written up in APA style submission ready student reports. In the second semester, most of the replications also include extensions with interesting insights. I will continue running this in academic year 2019-2020 with 20+ new replications+extensions. If any of this is of interest to you – lots of ways to join in. I am looking for interested early career researchers to join us.