Ignacio Ojea Quintana

Ignacio Ojea Quintana
Australian National University | ANU · School of Philosophy

About

10
Publications
841
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30
Citations
Introduction
I am a Research Fellow at the Philosophy Department of the Australian National University working on issues about trust in social networks and the impact of artificial intelligence in online communities. I just finished my PhD at Columbia University with a dissertation on collective and distributed opinions and preferences.

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
This paper focuses on radical pooling, or the question of how to aggregate credences when there is a fundamental disagreement about which is the relevant logical space for inquiry. The solution advanced is based on the notion of consensus as common ground (Levi in Synthese 62:3–11, 1985), where agents can find it by suspending judgment on logical p...
Preprint
Full-text available
Attitudes about vaccination have become more polarized; it is common to see vaccine disinformation and fringe conspiracy theories online. An observational study of Twitter vaccine discourse is found in Ojea Quintana et al. (2021): the authors analyzed approximately six months' of Twitter discourse -- 1.3 million original tweets and 18 million retwe...
Preprint
Full-text available
Trust in vaccination is eroding, and attitudes about vaccination have become more polarized. This is an observational study of Twitter analyzing the impact that COVID-19 had on vaccine discourse over the first 5 months of the pandemic. Using Gephi's implementation of the Louvain modularity algorithm, we find that authors cluster into several large,...
Article
Full-text available
Epidemiological models directly shape policy responses to public health crises. We argue that they also play a less obvious but important role in solving certain coordination problems and social dilemmas that arise during pandemics. This role is both ethically and epistemically valuable. However, it also gives rise to an underappreciated dilemma, a...
Preprint
Full-text available
Epidemiological models directly shape policy responses to public health crises. We argue that they also play a less obvious but important role in solving certain coordination problems and social dilemmas that arise during pandemics. This role is both ethically and epistemically valuable. However, it also gives rise to an underappreciated dilemma, a...
Preprint
Full-text available
Protests and counter-protests seek to draw and direct attention and concern with confronting images and slogans. In recent years, as protests and counter-protests have partially migrated to the digital space, such images and slogans have also gone online. Two main ways in which these images and slogans are translated to the online space is through...
Article
Full-text available
We explore which types of probabilistic updating commute with convex IP pooling (Stewart and Ojea Quintana 2017). Positive results are stated for Bayesian conditionalization (and a mild generalization of it), imaging, and a certain parameterization of Jeffrey conditioning. This last observation is obtained with the help of a slight generalization o...
Article
Full-text available
The question of how the probabilistic opinions of different individuals should be aggregated to form a group opinion is controversial. But one assumption seems to be pretty much common ground: for a group of Bayesians, the representation of group opinion should itself be a unique probability distribution (Madansky [44]; Lehrer and Wagner [34]; McCo...
Conference Paper
The purpose of this essay is to study the extent in which the semantics for different logical systems can be represented game theoretically. I will begin by considering different definitions of what it means to gamify a semantics, and show completeness and limitative results. In particular, I will argue that under a proper definition of gamificatio...
Article
I will argue that Roy Cook's (forthcoming) reformulation of Yablo's Paradox in the infinitary system D is a genuinely non-circular paradox, but for different reasons than the ones he sustained. In fact, the first part of the job will be to show that his argument regarding the absence of fixed points in the construction is insufficient to prove the...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
This project provides an explanation for online segregation and integration by extending some ideas originally developed by Schelling [1969, 1971]. Agents in a social network aim to satisfy homophily and heterophily thresholds but, unlike other Schelling-like models, they do not change location within at topology but they cut and form new ties with neighbors. Hence the model is designed to represent the dynamics of friending/unfriending and following/unfollowing in social media. Although it is different from Schelling's, the model reveals that high degrees of macro segregation (integration) can emerge even with moderate homophily (heterophily) preferences at the micro level. We also show that heterophily has more effect than homophily in unequal populations. These results are demonstrated analytically and using simulations in Netlogo. The upshot, much like in Schelling's original models, is that large scale online segregation can emerge from otherwise innocuous individual behavior.