Ignacio A Lazagabaster

Ignacio A Lazagabaster
University of Liverpool | UoL · Evolution, Ecology & Behaviour

PhD

About

27
Publications
4,234
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152
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2014 - May 2016
Arizona State University
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
Full-text available
The Early Pleistocene was a critical time period in the evolution of eastern African mammal faunas, but fossil assemblages sampling this interval are poorly known from Ethiopia’s Afar Depression. Field work by the Hadar Research Project in the Busidima Formation exposures (~2.7–0.8 Ma) of Hadar in the lower Awash Valley, resulted in the recovery of...
Article
Full-text available
The Middle Pleistocene archaeological record of the southern Levant has proven key to understanding human evolution and intercontinental faunal biogeography. Knowledge of archaeological sites of that period in the southern Levant is biased, with most Middle Pleistocene localities in the Mediterranean areas in the north, despite the mosaic of enviro...
Article
Full-text available
Long temporal records of Holocene wild mammal communities are essential to examine the role of human impacts and climatic fluctuations in the configuration of modern ecosystems. We show that such records can be assembled through extensive radiocarbon dating of faunal remains obtained from biogenic cave deposits. We dated 110 mammalian remains from...
Article
Most biogeographers considered the Maghreb to be part of the Palearctic biogeographic region, though it is relatively recently that the proportion of Palearctic species increased there. How and when exactly these biogeographic changes occurred is not well understood, but they are probably the result of the increasing aridification of the Sahara and...
Article
Full-text available
Biotic interactions between Africa and Eurasia across the Levant have invoked particular attention among scientists aiming to unravel early human dispersals. However, it remains unclear whether behavioral capacities enabled early modern humans to surpass the Saharo–Arabian deserts or if climatic changes triggered punctuated dispersals out of Africa...
Article
Full-text available
African forest hogs (genus Hylochoerus) are extant Afro-tropical suids that inhabit a variety of forest environments and thick bushlands and are predominantly herbivores. Hylochoerus likely evolved from a Pleistocene Kolpochoerus majus-like ancestor, but its recent evolutionary history is virtually unknown. Here, we describe a partial right lower t...
Article
Full-text available
Investigating historical anthropogenic impacts on faunal communities is key to understanding present patterns of biodiversity and holds important implications for conservation biology. While several studies have demonstrated the human role in the extinction of large herbivores, effective methods to study human interference on large carnivores in th...
Article
89th Annual Meeting of the American-Association-of-Physical-Anthropologists (AAPA), Los Angeles, CA, APR 15-18, 2020
Article
Full-text available
Suids are among the most common mammalian groups in the Plio-Pleistocene vertebrate fossil record of Africa and the most studied largely due to their significance as biochronological indicators. However, despite their abundance in the fossil record, the remains are mostly isolated teeth and fragmentary crania and mandibles. As a result, disagreemen...
Article
Stable carbon isotope studies suggest that early hominins may have diversified their diet as early as 3.76 Ma. Early Pliocene hominins, including Australopithecus anamensis, had diets that were dominated by C 3 resources while Late Pliocene hominins, including Australopithecus afarensis—a putative descendant of A. anamensis—had diets that included...
Article
Analyses of stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) from herbivore dental enamel and paleosol carbonates are important tools for Plio-Pleistocene paleovegetation reconstructions. A single herbivore tooth documents an isotopic record of vegetation on the order of 10–1–1 years and in proportion to that individual's foraging range. Paleosol carbonates, converse...
Article
Suidae cranial material is very scarce in South Africa. Here we present a newly found partial cranium recovered from the site of Malapa, South Africa. The cranium is dorsoventrally crushed and does not preserve dentition. We reconstruct the cranium using three-dimensional techniques based on more complete material from Eastern Africa. We assign the...
Article
The fossiliferous late Pliocene deposits of the Lee Adoyta sub-basin, lower Awash Valley (LAV), Ethiopia, sample a poorly-known time interval in this region (~2.82 to <2.5 Ma). Recent fieldwork in Lee Adoyta by the Ledi-Geraru Research Project has produced a rich mammalian fauna, including the earliest specimen of the genus Homo. Here, we describe...
Article
Reconstructions of habitat at sites like Kanapoi are key to understanding the environmental circumstances in which hominins evolved during the early Pliocene. While Australopithecus anamensis shows evidence of terrestrial bipedality traditionally associated with a more open setting, its enamel has low δ¹³C values consistent with consumption of C3 f...
Article
Full-text available
Establishing the relationship between craniodental morphology and dietary ecology in extant species permits inferences to be made about the ecology and biology of fossil species and the habitats they inhabited. Previous work linking diet and craniodental morphology has historically relied upon categorical classifications of diet and has not conside...
Article
Dietary inferences are a key foundation for paleoecological, ecomorphological and macroevolutionary studies because they inform us about the direct relationships between the components of an ecosystem. However, we need to consider the range of dietary variation we want to investigate and characterize before choosing a proxy. The goal of the present...
Conference Paper
The evolutionary history of ungulates in Africa is marked by the appearance and diversification of a suite of craniodental adaptations presumably related to diet. These morphological traits, in addition to stable carbon isotope (δ13C) data, have been widely used to infer the diet of extinct species, although the relationship between these proxies r...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Ledi-Geraru research area forms part the Lower Awash Valley (Afar, Ethiopia), a region with abundant sedimentary deposits which have yielded some of the most emblematic hominin fossil discoveries in the history of paleoanthropology. Ledi-Geraru is localized north of Hadar and Dikika, and west of Gona. A series of surveys carried out since 2002...
Conference Paper
The potential role of basinal endemism in structuring patterns of hominin biogeography remains largely unexplored. Here we attempt to bridge this gap by analyzing patterns of endemism across eastern Africa during two periods in human evolution, one in which a single lineage (Australopithecus anamensis-afarensis) is patchily distributed, and the sec...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Se han analizado 262 cráneos de individuos adultos de sexo no determinado, proce-dentes de la Maqbara de San Nicolás (Murcia, s. XI-XIII). Esta necrópolis, situada so-bre una capa de limos de origen fluvial, fue excavada por un equipo de antropólogos que siguió la misma metodología durante cinco campañas. Se pretende analizar la pre-servación relat...
Poster
Full-text available
Se presentan dos cráneos con una cavidad en el hueso temporal izquierdo. Se trata de lesiones únicas y localizadas, con bordes redondeados y romos en el primer caso, e irregulares y afilados en el segundo. No se aprecia ningún signo de inflamación en las regiones adyacentes, ni contacto con el canal auditivo. La exploración macroscópica y radiológi...

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Is species diversity un-bounded or is it constrained by ecological limits? Are these limits imposed by biotic competition, or by physical drivers? Do phenotypic innovations release ecological bounds to diversity? These are crucial aspects of Cenozoic mammal evolution and macroecology that remain poorly understood. We try to answer this questions analyzing a functional big-database of mammals using the latest statistical approaches.
Project
The project focuses on wild mammal community structure in the Judean Desert, and the way it changed through the Holocene in relation to human settlement intensity in the region. DEADSEA_ECO includes investigation of arid cave biogenic assemblages, bioarchaeological sampling of human settlement deposits, and dating of structures on the desert highlands. The research is supported by the European Research Council Horizon 2020 (Grant 802752, Nimrod Marom).