Ignacio Gestoso

Ignacio Gestoso
Universidad de Cádiz | UCA · Department of Biology

PhD

About

58
Publications
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632
Citations

Publications

Publications (58)
Article
Full-text available
Aims The present study is the first attempt to grasp the scale and richness of marine biological invasions in Macaronesia. We pioneered a comprehensive non‐native species (NNS), inventory in the region to determine their diversity patterns and native distribution origins. NNS were defined here as the result of both introductions and range expansion...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat loss and fragmentation, and biological invasions are widely considered the most significant threats to global biodiversity. While marine invasions have already shown dramatic impacts around the world’s coasts, many of these habitats are becoming increasingly urbanized, resulting in fragmentation of natural landscape worldwide. This study de...
Article
Full-text available
Globally, there is growing concern regarding the effects of the increasing anthropogenic pressures in marine communities. Artificial structures such as marinas and aquaculture facilities serve as invasion hotspots; hence, monitoring fouling communities on these structures can be valuable for detecting new invasions. In the current study, 24 settlem...
Presentation
Full-text available
Experiment about trophic transfer of microplastic, comparing native and invasive species. Funded by Assemble+ Transnational Access
Article
Plasticrusts are a novel form of plastic debris which has only recently been discovered in Madeira Island, NE Atlantic Ocean. Plasticrusts consist of plastic encrusting wave-exposed rocky intertidal habitats and are presumably generated by waves smashing plastic debris against intertidal rocks. However, direct observations of this process are lacki...
Article
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Species of the genera Cystoseira, Ericaria, Gongolaria, and Sargassum (family Sargassaceae) are key components of the Mediterranean-Atlantic marine forests, essential for biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Populations of these foundational species are particularly vulnerable to anthropogenic impacts, likely to be intensified under future scena...
Article
Global warming is increasing the frequency, duration and intensity of extreme events such as marine heat waves (MHWs). The effects of MHWs include a variety of negative environmental impacts. Extreme weather events can interact with other environmental stressors such as invasion by marine non-indigenous species (NIS). The aim of this study was to (...
Article
Full-text available
Rising sea surface temperatures affect the feeding behaviour and reproductive success of many coastal benthic invertebrates. This experimental study investigated the effects of ocean warming on macroalgal food consumption rates in the sea urchins Arbacia lixula and Paracentrotus lividus from Madeira Island to assess how the feeding pressure they ex...
Article
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Macroalgal forests play a key role in shallow temperate rocky reefs worldwide, supporting communities with high productivity and providing several ecosystem services. Sea urchin grazing has been increasingly influencing spatial and temporal variation in algae distributions and it has become the main cause for the loss of these habitats in many coas...
Article
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The global lockdown to mitigate COVID-19 pandemic health risks has altered human interactions with nature. Here, we report immediate impacts of changes in human activities on wildlife and environmental threats during the early lockdown months of 2020, based on 877 qualitative reports and 332 quantitative assessments from 89 different studies. Hundr...
Article
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Marine forests ecosystems are typical of temperate rocky benthic areas. These systems are formed by canopy-forming macroalgae (Laminariales, Tilopteridales and Fucales) of high ecological value that provide numerous ecosystem services. These key species are also indicators of good environmental status. In recent decades, marine forests have been th...
Article
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The threat posed by invasive non-native species worldwide requires a global approach to identify which introduced species are likely to pose an elevated risk of impact to native species and ecosystems. To inform policy, stakeholders and management decisions on global threats to aquatic ecosystems, 195 assessors representing 120 risk assessment area...
Article
https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1cc8a8MvAtqOZ5 (ONLINE FREE DOWNLOAD LINK FOR 50 DAYS, until 10/04/2021) Ascidians are recognized as major invaders on a global scale, found from the poles to the tropics and from shallow to deep sea waters with approximately 3000 known described species worldwide. However, to date only a few opportunistic studies fo...
Article
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To evaluate the impact of successful invasions of marine ecosystems by non- indigenous species (NIS) in a future climate change scenario, we analysed how an increase in temperature may affect biotic interactions between resident species and newcomers. In this context, we examined the effect of temperature on interference competition (i.e. displacem...
Article
Seagrass meadows are globally recognized as important coastal habitats due to the various ecological functions and ecosystem services they provide. Substantial global decline of seagrass habitats has been recorded over the last decades, underlining the need for extensive studies, including monitoring and mapping these habitats across their distribu...
Article
In recent decades, maritime traffic has been increasing globally. Introduction vectors involving ships, hull fouling and ballast water are often cited as having high risk for introducing marine non-indigenous species (NIS) worldwide. Due to its geographical location, Madeira Island (Portugal) had a significant role in past maritime connections, wit...
Article
Full-text available
Marine litter is currently worldwide distributed , and plastic is its principal component. Nevertheless, to date, little is known about how this global threat is affecting the marine coastal areas of the Madeira archipelago (NE Atlantic). In this context, we conducted the first comprehensive survey for marine litter characterization in the region,...
Article
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Microbial biofilms can be key mediators for settlement of macrofoulers. The present study examines the coupled effects of microbial biofilms and local environmental conditions on the composition, structure and functioning of macrofouling assemblages. Settlement of invertebrates over a gradient of human-impacted sites was investigated on local biofi...
Article
Marine microplastic pollution is an issue of great concern nowadays since high concentrations have been detected in the ocean, mainly in the subtropical gyres that accumulate this type of debris. The long-term effects of this pollution on ecosystems and marine biota are still unknown. The aim of this study is to quantify and characterise microplast...
Article
Assessing the resistance of fouling communities to anthropogenic disturbances is an important goal for the development of effective management and control strategies. In this context, we conducted a manipulative experiment on natural and artificial habitats to examine fouling communities that developed outside and inside a marina on Madeira Island...
Article
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The impact of invasive species on recipient communities can vary with environmental context and across levels of biological complexity. We investigated how an established invasive seaweed species affected the biomass, eco-physiology, carbon and nitrogen storage capacity of native seaweeds at sites with a different environmental setting due to a per...
Poster
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The archipelago of Madeira (Portugal) is located in the NE Atlantic and belongs to the biogeographical region of Macaronesia. The aquaculture industry is an emerging activity in the island, accounting for 60% of national sea bream production. Given the physical and oceanographic features of this outermost region, and the lack of information regardi...
Article
Rocky intertidal communities have proved to be tractable systems for experimental ecology, contributing much to our general understanding of population and community ecology. Physical environmental factors are usually considered strong structuring elements for these assemblages. In this study, we adopted a mixed model sampling design to study the e...
Article
Plastic debris is one of the most extensive pollution problems our planet is facing today and a particular concern for marine environment conservation. The dimension of the problem is so large that it is possible our current era will generate an anthropogenic marker horizon of plastic in earth's sedimentary record. Here we present a new type of pla...
Article
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The patterns of variability in the composition and structure of benthic communities along two depth strata (5 and 10 m) and the presence of sea urchins in structuring the subtidal rocky reefs were quantified in a long-established coastal marine protected area (Garajau MPA) and in two size equivalent and contiguous impacted areas (one highly urbaniz...
Article
Hull fouling has been a driving force behind the development of most modern marine antifouling coatings that mainly contain copper based biocides to inhibit growth of fouling organisms. Despite these efforts, several non-indigenous species continue to be transferred via hull-fouling worldwide. In this study we designed a disturbance gradient with t...
Article
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The introduction of non‑indigenous species (NIS) in new environments represents a major threat for coastal ecosys‑tems. A good understanding of the mechanisms and magnitude of the impact of NIS colonisation on native eco‑systems is becoming increasingly crucial to develop mitigation measures and prevent new invasions. In this present study, we aske...
Article
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Biotic interactions, particularly predation/grazing and competition, are key factors limiting the introduction success of non-indigenous species (NIS). In addition, positive interactions are considered important drivers of community structure, and both positive and negative interactions between native and NIS can determine the ability of communitie...
Article
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Properties of the shells and byssus filaments secreted by marine mussels are affected by environmental and biotic factors. In this study, we investigated the effects of pH and temperature on shell and byssus in artificially created monospecific and mixed aggregations of the indigenous mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis and the invasive mussel Xenostr...
Article
While exploring the presence of non-indigenous fouling species colonizing settlement plates deployed in local marinas in Madeira Island (north-eastern AtlanticOcean), two non-indigenous species (NIS) of free-swimming crustaceans, Paracerceis sculpta (Holmes, 1904) and Sphaeroma walkeri Stebbing, 1905 (Isopoda: Sphaeromatidae), were detected. Parace...
Article
Biological invasions are a major threat to the world's biota and are considered a major cause of biodiversity loss. Therefore, world marine policy has recognized the need for more marine protected areas (MPAs) as a major tool for biodiversity conservation. The present work experimentally evaluated how protected communities from an offshore island c...
Article
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Different combinations of behavioural and physiological responses may play a crucial role in the ecological success of species, notably in the context of biological invasions. The invasive mussel Xenostrobus securis has successfully colonised the inner part of the Galician Rias Baixas (NW Spain), where it co-occurs with the commercially-important m...
Data
Temperature data recorded by robo-mussels. Robo-mussels recorded temperatures in mussel beds every 30 minutes during July and August 2013. (TIF)
Article
Predation is one of the most important factors in determining structure and dynamics of communities on intertidal rocky shores. Such regulatory role may be of special relevance in novel communities resulting from biological invasions. Non-indigenous species frequently escape natural predators that limit their distribution and abundance in the nativ...
Article
Expansion of invasive species in new host habitats is mediated by a combination of concurrent biotic and abiotic factors. Xenostrobus securis is an invasive mussel species that is spreading in the inner part of the Galician Rias Baixas, particularly in areas of low salinity. It cooccurs with the commercially important blue mussel Mytilus galloprovi...
Article
Climate-driven and biodiversity effects on the structure and functioning of ecosystems are increasingly studied as multiple stressors, which subsequently may influence species invasions. We used a mesocosm experiment to test how increases in temperature and CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) interact with functional diversity of resident macroalgal assemb...
Article
Anthropogenically induced global climate change has important implications for marine ecosystems with unprecedented ecological and economic consequences. Climate change will include the simultaneous increase of temperature and CO 2 concentration in oceans. However, experimental manipulations of these factors at the community scale are rare. In this...
Article
Marine algae are known to provide habitats for a wide range of marine organ-isms. Populations of marine epiphytal invertebrates are generalists and are less adapted to live in only one macroalga species. However, there are some exam-ples of local adaptation and, in particular, amphipods have shown strong host specificity. Amphitholina cuniculus, an...
Article
Full-text available
Estuaries, bays and other sheltered coastal areas are frequent environments of marine invasions. These invasive species can have great impacts mainly when they reach high density or if they have new functional attributes. Invasive bivalves are considered ecosystem engineers with this capacity. The invasive mussel Xenostrobus securis, a small brown...
Article
Full-text available
Seaweeds are a refuge from stressful conditions associated with life on rocky intertidal shores, and there is evidence that different macrophytes support different assemblages of mobile epifauna. Introduction of non-indigenous macroalgae may have a great impact on associated epifaunal assemblages and ecosystem processes in coastal areas. Previous s...
Article
Full-text available
Marine macroalgae harbour abundant and diverse assemblages of epifauna. Patterns of distribution and abundance of epifauna, which are often variable in space and time, differ markedly among macroalgae species. Non-indigenous seaweeds may alter composition and structure of epifaunal assemblages and therefore harbour different assemblages from those...

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Objective 1 (O1) – Patterns. Which is the present ecological status of macroalgal forest from the human impacted coast of Madeira Archipelago? Objective 2 (O2) – Processes. Is this status naturally occurring or is it a degraded status consequence of human threats? Which are the main factors involved in determining the present conservation status? Which are the principal human threats operating here: local vs. global stressors? Objective 3 (O3) – Actions and Restoration. How can we promote or manipulate resident macroalgal communities, through biotic and abiotic interventions, to provide enough input for restoring the ecological degraded coastal systems?
Project
This project investigates plastic pollution in Europe. For that, we collect organisms and environmental samples that we analyse in the laboratory. We use FTIR and µFTIR for polymer identification.
Project
Litter disposal and accumulation in the marine environment is one of the fastest growing threats for the world’s oceans health. The issue has been highlighted by the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP, 2009) and was included in the 11 Descriptors of Good Environmental Status set by Europe’s Marine Strategy Framework directive (2008/56/EC). More recently, the G-7 leaders (during the 41st G-7 Summit, 7-8 June 2015), acknowledged that marine litter poses a global challenge and emphasized on the need to increase effectiveness and intensity of the work to combat marine litter. The presence and extent of plastic debris in the marine environment is of environmental concern because they are potentially bioavailable to a wide range of marine biota. Ingestion and entanglement in marine litter has been reported for a wide variety of organisms, from small zooplanktonic animals to large baleen whales (Kühln et al. 2015). So far, more than 700 species have been observed to have ingested marine plastics (Gall and Thomson, 2015) and the number of occurrences is constantly increasing. In some areas, entire populations are at risk (e.g. Knowlton et al. 2012; Richards and Beger, 2011) with cascading effects that may eventually result in the disruption of key ecosystem function and services (Newmann, 2015). As a result, marine litter adds a significant stressor to marine environments already under pressure from anthropogenic disturbances and given plastics ubiquitous nature this is a global and indiscriminate threat to the health of our seas and oceans. In addition to the ecological consequences listed above, marine litter has considerable socio-economic impacts. Some regional studies showed that the economic impact are extremely high (e.g. Mouat et al. 2010). Currently, it is estimated that about 13 million tonnes of plastic is entering the marine environment every year (Jambeck et al. 2015). Therefore, it is not surprising that plastic debris is commonly observed everywhere in the oceans (Galgani et al. 2015). Although geographically isolated from large population centres, the Azores is not immune from this growing environmental threat. The islands are located at the edge of accumulation zones of floating litter in the Atlantic (Maximenko et al. 2012; Erikssen et al. 2014) and the few studies and coastal clean-ups performed throughout the archipelago, suggest that large amount of macro and micro litter is present on the coastline and on the seafloor (Pham et al. 2013; Pieper, 2013). With the exception of the project AZORLIT (Establishing a Baseline on Marine Litter in the Azores; IUCN- project no P01495), no scientific projects have been dedicated to the study of marine litter in the region. Yet, anecdotal information suggest that many organisms are affected by this problem (e.g. turtles; Barreiros and Raykov, 2014; fish; Barreiros and Guerreiro, 2014; marine birds; Pedro et al. 2013) but consistent monitoring has yet to be undertaken. The presence of marine debris in 25% of the stomachs of turtles (Carreta carreta) analysed by Frick et al.(2009) suggests a clear threat to this species in the Azores and highlights the importance of investigating this topic in more details. This is also true for Cory’s Shearwater (Calonectris borealis), where 95% of the juveniles were found to have plastic in their stomachs (Van Franeker and Bried, unpublished data). A recent workshop (“Towards a Solution for Marine Litter in the Azores”) organised in Horta (19-20 June 2015) confirmed there is concern from local stakeholders and highlighted the need for more research in this field. The overall objective of this research proposal will be to provide some solid baseline data on the impact of marine litter on the marine ecosystems of the Azores that will help policy makers to address this problem in the region.