Ian A. Tattam

Ian A. Tattam
State of Oregon · Department of Fish and Wildlife

MS

About

14
Publications
6,559
Reads
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273
Citations
Citations since 2017
4 Research Items
228 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023010203040
2017201820192020202120222023010203040
2017201820192020202120222023010203040
Additional affiliations
January 2007 - March 2011
Oregon State University
Position
  • FRA

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Barge transportation of steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) smolts through the Snake and Columbia rivers can increase the probability of straying by returning adults at the individual scale. However, the effect of barge transportation on a major population group has not been evaluated. We estimated the proportion of hatchery origin steelhead spawners p...
Article
Full-text available
Beaver have been referred to as ecosystem engineers because of the large impacts their dam building activities have on the landscape; however, the benefits they may provide to fluvial fish species has been debated. We conducted a watershed-scale experiment to test how increasing beaver dam and colony persistence in a highly degraded incised stream...
Article
Growth and movement of juvenile salmonids influence the expression of individual life history traits and production of adults at the population scale. We individually marked and recaptured juvenile Oncorhynchus mykiss over the course of a year in Murderers Creek, a semi-arid tributary to the South Fork John Day River in Northeast Oregon. We tagged...
Article
Full-text available
Anadromous Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha commonly mature at 3–5 years of age. Age at maturity is an important measure of population diversity, and has ecological importance. In the John Day River, a northeast Oregon tributary of the Columbia River, we tagged 24,240 wild Chinook Salmon smolts from 10 successive cohorts with passive integra...
Article
Full-text available
Juvenile Oncorhynchus mykiss migrate extensively in freshwater during the fall. We used individual tagging to study the spatial origin, influences, and outcomes of fall migration on fish that emigrated from summer rearing tributaries during the fall (early emigrants) and those that did not (late emigrants) in the South Fork John Day River, Oregon....
Article
Full-text available
Rotary screw traps are used in rivers throughout the west coast of North America to capture emigrating juvenile salmonids. Calibrating the capture efficiency of each trap is essential for valid estimates of fish passage. We released PIT-tagged Oncorhynchus mykiss upstream of a rotary screw trap in the South Fork John Day River, Oregon, to estimate...
Conference Paper
We review the initial results of a long-term restoration and monitoring project to restore the lower 32 km of Bridge Creek, an incised and degraded tributary to the John Day River in eastern Oregon, USA. The goal of the project is to cause a detectable population-level benefit to the anadromous steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) that use this sy...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding seasonal changes in growth, survival, and movement rates is crucial to salmonid management. These life history characteristics provide a context for evaluation of management actions. We evaluated the life history of individually marked Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri in the South Fork John Day River basin in Northeastern Oregon. This th...
Article
Full-text available
Resource managers need an accurate, reliable means of distinguishing hatchery-origin steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss from wild stocks. We evaluated the effectiveness of scale pattern analysis at distinguishing between wild and hatchery (progeny of wild broodstock) winter steelhead collected at Powerdale Dam in the Hood River basin. The characteristic...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
The Bridge Creek IMW is a watershed scale restoration experiment designed to test the effectiveness of beaver dam analog (BDA) structures in accelerating the recovery trajectory of incised stream channels, assist beaver in building more persistent dams, and to determine if this improve steelhead habitat and ultimately steelhead production.