Ian M Latella

Ian M Latella
University of Nevada, Reno | UNR · Department of Biology

M.Sc

About

26
Publications
8,461
Reads
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267
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2006 - present
University of New Mexico
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • BIO 124 Introduction to Biology for Health Sciences Majors BIO 202 Genetics BIO 386 General Vertebrate Zoology BIO 488 Herpetology BIO 461 Tropical Biology BIO 436/536 Phylogenetics

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
The worldwide spread of invasive species affects native biodiversity and causes economic loss, but also allows better understanding of historical biogeographic patterns. Prediction of likely invaders facilitates economic and conservation decisions and gives insight into characteristics that have allowed natural colonization over evolutionary time....
Article
Full-text available
The distributions and characteristics of naturalized species may be explained by novel anthropogenous aspects of world biogeography such as the creation of favorable transport environments for propagules on ships. Conversely, the unprecedented connectivity of humans may simply accelerate omnipresent ecological and evolutionary forces, for example,...
Article
Full-text available
A new species of Anolis is described from western Panama and eastern Costa Rica. Populations of the new form were previously allocated to A. chocorum. However, the new species differs from A. chocorum in characters of color pattern, scalation and proportion.
Article
Full-text available
For species with variable phenology, it is often challenging to produce reliable estimates of population dynamics or changes in occupancy. The Arizona Toad (Anaxyrus microscaphus) is a southwestern USA endemic that has been petitioned for legal protection, but status assessments are limited by a lack of information on population trends. Also, timin...
Article
1 Nonnative (“invasive,” “exotic,” “naturalized”) species frequently are vilified. However, some philosophers and ecologists have questioned whether nonnative species and assemblages are objectively, ahistorically identifiable as different entities relative to native species and assemblages, once selection biases are taken into account. 2.We used a...
Article
Full-text available
Adaptive radiation is a widely recognized pattern of evolution wherein substantial phenotypic change accompanies rapid speciation. Adaptive radiation may be triggered by environmental opportunities resulting from dispersal to new areas or via the evolution of traits, called key innovations, that allow for invasion of new niches. Species sampling is...
Article
Full-text available
Anolis lizards (anoles) are textbook study organisms in evolution and ecology. Although several topics in evolutionary biology have been elucidated by the study of anoles, progress in some areas has been hampered by limited phylogenetic information on this group. Here we present a phylogenetic analysis of all 379 extant species of Anolis, with new...
Article
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Hybridization, facilitated by habitat modification, poses a significant conservation risk to many amphibian species. The construction of water impoundments, which alter stream conditions, has facilitated the spread of Woodhouse’s Toads (Anaxyrus woodhousii) and resulted in hybridization with Arizona Toads (A. microscaphus) in Arizona, Nevada, and U...
Article
Full-text available
Ectotherms such as lizards are expected to alter their behaviour and microhabitat use and experience population declines in response to rising temperatures. But the role of changing rainfall patterns on lizard behaviour and microhabitat use is not understood. We used a 5-year rainfall manipulation experiment in a piñon pine-juniper woodland in cent...
Article
Full-text available
We describe a new species of Anolis from the Andes of northern Peru. This form is similar to species formerly assigned to the genus Phenacosaurus and to Ernest Williams' tigrinus series. That is, the new species possesses large smooth headscales, cryptic coloration, and short limbs and tail. We present new DNA and morphological data and perform a c...
Article
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Koerner. 2015. Too wet for frogs: changes in a tropical leaf litter community coincide with La Niña . Ecosphere 6(1):4. http://dx. Abstract. Extreme climatic events such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation profoundly affect many plants and animals, including amphibians, which are strongly negatively affected by drought conditions. How amphibians re...
Presentation
Full-text available
Abstract: The global amphibian crisis is broad in scope and urgency with an estimated 43% of all species in decline and 32% of species threatened with extinction. While tropical declines have received a lot of attention, amphibian declines in the arid southwestern United States is also a pressing issue. The fungal disease Batrachochytrium dendrobat...
Article
Full-text available
Males of the three species of the Anolis laevis group, so-called proboscis anoles, display a remarkable appendage extending from the snout. All A. laevis group Anolis are poorly known and rarely collected. We redescribe Anolis proboscis based on the type specimen and male and female specimens we collected recently near the town of Mindo, Pichincha...
Article
A new species of Anolis is described from western Panama and eastern Costa Rica. Populations of the new form were previously allocated to A. chocorum. However, the new species differs from A. chocorum in characters of color pattern, scalation and proportion.

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Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
Purpose of Project: This project will collect data that can be used to assess the occurrence and distribution of the Gila monster (Heloderma suspectum) in Hidalgo County in southwestern New Mexico. The Gila monster is a Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) and is listed as endangered by the State of New Mexico. Random walk, time constrained surveys will be employed and Gila monsters encountered during these surveys will be measured. This project will involve a public participation component to encourage local residents to report Gila monster observations and distribution information for this species. This study coincides with a New Mexico Department of Game and Fish (Agency) initiative to develop a recovery plan this species. The goal of this work is to identify additional populations, to complement the well-studied Red Rock population (Grant County), to establish and implement long-term monitoring of multiple Gila monster populations.