Ian Cresswell

Ian Cresswell
UNSW Sydney | UNSW

Doctor of Philosophy

About

60
Publications
17,612
Reads
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1,543
Citations
Introduction
Ian has extensive national and international experience in ecosystem and species management, protected areas, oceans governance, and fisheries and wildlife regulation.
Additional affiliations
July 2019 - present
private
Position
  • Head of Faculty
Description
  • Independent scientist working in ecology and environmental science
July 2014 - July 2019
The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Position
  • Research Director
Description
  • Ian was responsible for leading CSIRO's program for the development of biodiversity and landscape management science to help Australians manage and protect biological resources, while also allowing broader economic, social and environmental benefit.
October 2008 - June 2014
The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Position
  • Managing Director
Description
  • Ian was responsible for ensuring the quality of the Flagship’s science and aligning its research activities for maximum benefit to its partners, stakeholders and the nation.

Publications

Publications (60)
Article
Full-text available
This is a synopsis of the 2021 State of the Environment report for Australia. As chief authors of the report, we present some of the key findings here, including new chapters dedicated to extreme events and Indigenous voices.
Article
Estimating the economic value of ecosystem services derived from estuarine habitats is important for prioritising management, conservation, and restoration activities, but remains challenging. Recently, a novel approach to estimate the value of estuarine habitats for species commercially harvested from estuaries was developed, which incorporates Ba...
Article
Full-text available
Globally we are experiencing a decline in aggregate natural capital. Many primary industries and enterprises are highly dependent on renewable and non-renewable natural capital, but there has been little focus on measuring and monitoring the flows benefits from natural capital. Natural capital accounting can help by potentially enabling the enterpr...
Technical Report
Experimental natural capital accounts for the prawn-fishing industry in the Wallis Lake estuary. A report to Forests and Wood Products Australia and Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment from the Lifting farm gate profits: the role of natural capital accounts project.
Article
Full-text available
Globally, many river systems are under stress due to overconsumption of water. Governments have responded with programmes to deliver environmental water to improve environmental outcomes. Although such programmes are essential, they may not be sufficient to achieve all desired environmental outcomes. The benefits of environmental water allocation m...
Technical Report
Natural capital is the stock of renewable and non-renewable resources, such as the soil, air, water and biodiversity that combine to provide a flow of environmental services and benefits to society. These environmental services may include tangible products such as the provisioning of food and fibre, but may also include less tangible services such...
Technical Report
The 'Lifting farm gate profits: the role of natural capital accounts' project seeks to determine whether natural capital accounting could drive better decision making and productivity of primary industries, which depend on healthy natural habitats. This project examined the application of two existing frameworks to report on how primary industries...
Technical Report
This report describes a case study that tested the practical application of natural capital accounting to irrigated cotton enterprises in Australia using a combination of two international frameworks: the System of Environmental Economic Accounts and the Natural Capital Protocol. The case study forms part of a larger project that worked across thre...
Article
While Australia has a long history in conservation, less well known are Australia’s efforts to identify and conserve important sites of geoheritage significance. This paper provides a background to geoheritage and geoconservation in Australia and reviews the policies and legislation that underpin listing of sites of geoheritage significance in all...
Chapter
While coastal systems play a key role in the culture, economy and environment of Australia, perhaps the least understood of all Australian coastal systems are its mangroves and salt marshes. Subsequently their protection and conservation has not always been adequately or comprehensively addressed. At the national level there is no coordination of m...
Chapter
Australia has an extensively mangrove-lined coast and even though it has a relatively low human population compared to the length of its coastline, there have been significant impacts on its mangroves. Belonging to the Indo-Malesian Group of the Old World Mangroves, the most species-rich region of the World, Australia uniquely carries the Old World...
Chapter
Full-text available
Oceans affect nearly all components of our lives. Eight of the world’s 10 largest cities are located on the coast and over half the world’s population lives within 200 km of the coast, and around one-quarter within 100 km. Nearly nine in 10 Australians live within 50 km of the coast. Australia is connected to the rest of the world through a global...
Chapter
Australia has a vast and diverse marine estate. Australia’s marine domain is governed by strong domestic management as well as commitments to international and regional arrangements. Governance and management involves multiple agencies and jurisdictions with coordination mechanisms to deal with conflicts.
Chapter
Full-text available
People have been using marine resources for millennia for food, transportation, recreation and cultural purposes (Chapter 6). Advances in technology over recent decades have made it technically and economically feasible to access and use a wider range of living and non-living marine resources. Current annual ocean economic activity globally is esti...
Article
Ecosystem-based management (EBM) is now widely accepted as the best means of managing the complex interactions in marine systems. However, progress towards implementing and operationalizing it has been slow. We take a pragmatic approach to EBM. Our simple definition is balancing human activities and environmental stewardship in a multiple-use conte...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The value of Australia’s biodiversity is difficult to measure, but biodiversity is a key part of Australia’s national identity, and is integral to subsistence and cultural activity for Indigenous Australians. It is also fundamentally important to environmental services that support human health and wellbeing, and economically important to a wide ra...
Technical Report
The value of Australia’s biodiversity is difficult to measure, but biodiversity is a key part of Australia’s national identity, and is integral to subsistence and cultural activity for Indigenous Australians. It is also fundamentally important to environmental services that support human health and wellbeing, and economically important to a wide ra...
Chapter
Species zonation is a common feature within estuaries where the combined and interactive effects of steep environmental gradients and food availability and to interspe-cies competition, herbivory, and predation result in compositional changes in biotic assemblages across these gradients. For vegetation and for rock-inhabiting biota, it is often man...
Chapter
6.1 Introduction The concept of an ecosystem approach has arisen largely as a management response to decline in biodiversity and natural resources, which single species management and primarily sectoral approaches had failed to stem. Because of its integrated nature, an ecosystem approach was seen as a way to better manage multiple impacts on envir...
Article
Full-text available
The current measures of diversity for vegetation, namely alpha, beta, and gamma diversity are not logically consistent, which reduces their effectiveness as a framework for comparative vegetation analysis. The current terms mix concepts: specifically, while alpha diversity measures floristic diversity at a site, and gamma diversity measures florist...
Article
This article 1) examines the policy context that created a demand for biogeographic information, 2) describes early national and regional experiences in applying biogeographic classifications, 3) extracts lessons about their usefulness, 4) introduces a broad-scale biogeographic classification for the open ocean and deep seabed called the Global Ope...
Article
Full-text available
Mangroves along the Kimberley Coast occupy an unparalleled position globally: they reside in a tropical humid to subhumid climate in the species-rich setting of the Old World Mangroves, and are located along a macrotidal ria shore. This setting provides a range of habitats for mangroves related to larger scale hinterland influences, coastal landfor...
Article
Full-text available
Incorporating the areas of the rocky Kimberley Coast, flanked by the deltaic gulfs of Cambridge Gulf and King Sound, as well as the Dampier Peninsula, the Kimberley region host a complicated coastal zone with a plethora of coastal habitats. The smallest scale of habitat includes rocky cliff, scree slopes, gravelly/bouldery shore, sandy beaches, spi...
Article
The latest international status reports confirm that change, and especially loss, of biodiversity continues all over the globe. Consequently, it would seem the body of international biodiversity law and its attendant governance apparatus have failed to deliver their intended effects. From this standpoint, we argue that particular weaknesses in exis...
Article
Full-text available
A growing need to manage marine biodiversity sustainably at local, regional and global scales cannot be met by applying existing biological data. Abiotic surrogates of biodiversity are thus increasingly valuable in filling the gaps in our knowledge of biodiversity patterns, especially identification of hotspots, habitats needed by endangered or com...
Technical Report
Full-text available
http://www.iode.org/index.php?option=com_oe&task=viewDocumentRecord&docID=3931
Data
Full-text available
Provincial Bioregions of the Australian Marine Territories
Article
There is a recognised need to implement an integrated approach to natural resource management that leads to sustainable outcomes - the long-term viability and use of land and its associated natural resources. This includes both economic viability and the maintenance of environmental values (ecologically sustainable land management). The need for ad...
Article
There is a recognised need to implement an integrated approach to natural resource management that leads to sustainable outcomes—the long-term viability and use of land and its associated natural resources. This includes both economic viability and the maintenance of environmental values (ecologically sustainable land management). The need for adap...
Article
Australia is unique among continents in that it has tropical and temperate coastlines stretching the length of the continent (c. 3000 km), connected by western and eastern coastlines, of about the same length. In the interior, there are significant extensive systems of salt lakes, which can remain dry for many years, as well as typically dry depres...
Article
ABSTRACT The Australian Government has made a commitment to a National Land and Water Resources Audit (Audit) to provide data, analysis, and appraisal of natural resource management and to facilitate improved decision making at a range of scales. One of the themes within the Audit is ecosystem health. This article describes the goals of the Audit w...
Article
Several Australian-based efforts are currently underway to provide a better understanding of vegetation and broader ecosystem condition to inform management at a landscape scale. A key study, the National Land and Water Resources Audit, will foster more rigorous natural resource management decision making, by collating and presenting data on Austra...
Article
Full-text available
The natural seepage lines of the Leschenault Peninsula are expressions of the topography and stratigraphy, which act as sink and conduits for discharging groundwater. The drainage of the aquifer follows the lowest point in the landscape, and continues for some time after winter rainfall has ceased. Freshwater seepage sites are important in the firs...
Article
Full-text available
Five years of abundance data for the molluscs of the Leschenault Inlet estuary at 22 sites were analysed to provide preliminary results on patterns of their temporal and spatial variably and their potential associations. Only a limited number of the most commonly occurring species were selected for analysis, and only those collected in February and...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The taxonomic community globally sees an urgent need for capacity building and infrastructure renewal if taxonomy is to keep up with the demand for up-to-date information on species. The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) has recognised this taxonomic impediment and has formulated the concept of a Global Taxonomy Initiative (GTI) to progress...
Article
Full-text available
Despite an undeserved reputation for being dull and homogenous systems, mangal and saltmarsh in Australia have highly complex patterns and processes. Their role as key ‘edge’ systems between land and sea has implications for many species which have larval stages in mangal and saltmarsh, but spend adult life as benthic, pelagic or demersal species....
Book
Full-text available
This report documents the development of IMCRA and discusses how it may be used as a regional planning framework for conservation and sustainable resource use in coastal and marine environments. Several caveats and conditions are presented to assist users identify appropriate uses. IMCRA has been developed through the collaborative efforts of State...
Article
Vegetation pattern in Australia is influenced by climate and edaphic factors. A significant factor influencing pattern is also the cultural influence of Aboriginal people and their land management practices. These include burning of country to produce heterogeneity, and manipulation of small rainforest patches in a fashion akin to gardening. Landsc...
Article
Full-text available
Australia is a federation of eight states and territories, each of which controls its own protected areas system. These together with the federal system make nine separate protected areas systems. Each system has developed in a different way, with a variety of operational goals and terminology. A key requirement for cooperation between these jurisd...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The National Reserves System (NRS) encompasses the existing protected areas which are managed and / or administered by the State, mainland Territory or Commonwealth nature conservation agencies. One of the primary goals of the NRS is the conservation of biodiversity. Conservation may be achieved at a regional scale through a range of management mea...
Article
A method is proposed for identifying networks of protected areas to maximise the likelihood that they sample biological diversity. Environmental regionalisation is followed by the use of iterative heuristic algorithms to determine where protected areas should be located within regions so that all known species, communities, or environments are repr...
Technical Report
Full-text available
In 1985 the Commonwealth Government established the National Index of Ecosystems (NIE) for Australia. This is a collaborative project with the State and Territory nature conservation agencies with the aim of providing a framework for developing a truly national system of protected areas in Australia, which would conserve representative examples of...
Article
Full-text available
A classification is proposed for wetlands of the Darling System based on the scale of wetland vegetation copmlexes; extent of vegetation cover over the wetland; internal organization of vegetation in plan; vegetation structure; and details of the floristic/structural components. -from Authors
Article
Full-text available
The Quindalup Dunes contain a variety of aeolian landforms developed by regional climatic, geomorphic and sedimentologic factors, as well as local coastal/strandline processes, and vegetative and pedogenic processes. Superimposed on these are factors of distance from the strandline (which determines the degree of wind effects), soil salinity, and h...
Article
Classification revealed 49 generally species-rich vegetation units. -from Authors
Article
The Australian Government's regional marine planning program commenced under Australia's Oceans Policy in 2001 with a focus on the South-east Marine Region. The South-east Regional Marine Plan was completed and released in 2004. In 2005, the Government brought regional marine planning under the provisions of the powerful Environment Protection and...

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