Hugues Lantuit

Hugues Lantuit
Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research | AWI · Department of Permafrost Research

PhD

About

186
Publications
42,849
Reads
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Introduction
Hugues Lantuit leads the Arctic Coastal Research Group at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research
Education
September 2002 - November 2004
McGill University
Field of study
  • Geography
September 1998 - June 2002
Paris Diderot University
Field of study
  • Geography

Publications

Publications (186)
Article
Full-text available
Arctic permafrost coasts are sensitive to changing climate. The lengthening open water season and the increasing open water area are likely to induce greater erosion and threaten community and industry infrastructure as well as dramatically change nutrient pathways in the near-shore zone. The shallow, mediterranean Arctic Ocean is likely to be stro...
Article
Ongoing climate warming in the western Canadian Arctic is leading to thawing of permafrost soils and subsequent mobilization of its organic matter pool. Part of this mobilized terrestrial organic matter enters the aquatic system as dissolved organic matter (DOM) and is laterally transported from land to sea. Mobilized organic matter is an important...
Article
Full-text available
Arctic coasts, which feature land-ocean transport of freshwater, sediments, and other terrestrial material, are impacted by climate change, including increased temperatures, melting glaciers, changes in precipitation and runoff. These trends are assumed to affect productivity in fjordic estuaries. However, the spatial extent and temporal variation...
Article
Full-text available
Changes in snowpack associated with climatic warming has drastic impacts on surface energy balance in the cryosphere. Yet, traditional monitoring techniques, such as punctual measurements in the field, do not cover the full snowpack spatial and temporal variability, which hampers efforts to upscale measurements to the global scale. This variability...
Article
Full-text available
The Arctic is greatly affected by climate change. Increasing air temperatures drive permafrost thaw and an increase in coastal erosion and river discharge. This results in a greater input of sediment and organic matter into nearshore waters, impacting ecosystems by reducing light transmission through the water column and altering biogeochemistry. T...
Poster
Full-text available
La région Arctique est particulièrement fragilisée par les changements climatiques, où le réchauffement est deux à trois fois plus élevées qu’ailleurs sur la planète. On note une diminution massive de l’étendue et de l’épaisseur de la glace de mer, ce qui prolonge la période d’eau libre de glace et qui expose les côtes aux évènements de tempêtes pr...
Article
Abstract | Arctic coasts are vulnerable to the effects of climate change, including rising sea levels and the loss of permafrost, sea ice and glaciers. Assessing the influence of anthropogenic warming on Arctic coastal dynamics, however, is challenged by the limited availability of observational, oceanographic and environmental data. Yet, with the...
Conference Paper
People in the Arctic have been experiencing dramatic changes to their landscapes for several decades. One cause is the thawing of permafrost, which affects the livelihoods of indigenous people the hardest. The thawing process of permafrost is also associated with ecological impacts including the release of greenhouse gases. Thawing is evident from...
Preprint
Full-text available
Ongoing climate warming in the western Canadian Arctic is leading to thawing of permafrost soils and subsequent mobilization of its organic matter pool. Part of this mobilized terrestrial organic matter enters the aquatic system as dissolved organic matter (DOM) and is laterally transported from land to sea. Mobilized organic matter is an important...
Article
Full-text available
The Arctic is greatly impacted by climate change. The increase in air temperature drives the thawing of permafrost and an increase in coastal erosion and river discharge. This leads to a greater input of sediment and organic matter into coastal waters, which substantially impacts the ecosystems by reducing light transmission through the water colum...
Article
Full-text available
The Arctic is greatly impacted by climate change. The increase in air temperature drives the thawing of permafrost and an increase in coastal erosion and river discharge. This leads to a greater input of sediment and organic matter into coastal waters, which substantially impacts the ecosystems by reducing light transmission through the water colum...
Preprint
Full-text available
Changes in snowpack associated with climatic warming has drastic impacts on surface energy balance in the cryosphere. Yet, traditional monitoring techniques, such as punctual measurements in the field, do not cover the full snowpack spatial and temporal variability, which hampers efforts to upscale measurements to the global scale. This variability...
Article
Full-text available
We determine Hg concentrations of various deposits in Siberia's deep permafrost and link sediment properties and Hg enrichment to establish a first Hg inventory of late Pleistocene permafrost down to a depth of 36 m below surface. As Arctic warming is transforming the ice-rich permafrost of Siberia, sediment is released and increases the flux of pa...
Article
Full-text available
Permafrost thaw is a challenge in many Arctic regions, one that modifies ecosystems and affects infrastructure and livelihoods. To date, there have been no demographic studies of the population on permafrost. We present the first estimates of the number of inhabitants on permafrost in the Arctic Circumpolar Permafrost Region (ACPR) and project chan...
Preprint
Full-text available
In the Arctic, air temperatures are warming and sea ice is declining, resulting in larger waves and a longer open water season, all of which intensify the thaw and erosion of ice-rich coasts. This change in climate has been shown to increase the rate of Arctic coastal erosion, causing problems for industrial, military, and civil infrastructure as w...
Article
Full-text available
Warming air and sea temperatures, longer open-water seasons and sea-level rise collectively promote the erosion of permafrost coasts in the Arctic, which profoundly impacts organic matter pathways. Although estimates on organic carbon (OC) fluxes from erosion exist for some parts of the Arctic, little is known about how much OC is transformed into...
Presentation
In high Arctic fjords, riverine inputs of freshwater and terrestrial particles give rise to turbid plumes in the nearshore zone during melt season and thus act as a major impediment to light availability and primary productivity within the water column. However, the remoteness of Arctic fjords limits our understanding of key drivers of these plumes...
Article
Full-text available
Spatial analysis in earth sciences is often based on the concept of spatial autocorrelation, expressed by W. Tobler as the first law of geography: “everything is related to everything else, but near things are more related than distant things." Here, we show that subsurface soil properties in permafrost tundra terrain exhibit tremendous spatial var...
Article
Full-text available
Essay: https://arctic.noaa.gov/Report-Card/Report-Card-2020/ArtMID/7975/ArticleID/904/Coastal-Permafrost-Erosion
Article
Arctic coastal infrastructure and cultural and archeological sites are increasingly vulnerable to erosion and flooding due to amplified warming of the Arctic, sea level rise, lengthening of open water periods, and a predicted increase in frequency of major storms. Mitigating these hazards necessitates decision-making tools at an appropriate scale....
Article
Full-text available
Collapse of permafrost coasts delivers large quantities of particulate organic carbon (POC) to arctic coastal areas. With rapidly-changing environmental conditions, sediment and organic carbon (OC) mobilization and transport pathways are also changing. Here, we assess the sources and sinks of POC in the highly-dynamic nearshore zone of Herschel Isl...
Article
Full-text available
Plain Language Summary Increasing air and sea surface temperatures at high latitudes leads to accelerated thaw, destabilization, and erosion of perennially frozen soils (i.e., permafrost), which are often rich in organic carbon. Coastal erosion leads to an increased mobilization of organic carbon into the Arctic Ocean, which there can be converted...
Article
Full-text available
Plain Language Summary One effect climate change has in the Arctic is the thawing of permafrost. Permafrost is defined as ground that remains below 0 °C for at least two consecutive years. The low temperatures in the High North lead to very slow decomposition rates of organic material from plants and animals. A lot of this material has accumulated...
Poster
Full-text available
Abstract is available at: https://epic.awi.de/id/eprint/50808/
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is affecting the rate of carbon cycling, particularly in the Arctic. Permafrost degradation through deeper thaw and physical disturbances results in the release of carbon dioxide and methane to the atmosphere and to an increase in lateral dissolved organic matter (DOM) fluxes. Whereas riverine DOM fluxes of the large Arctic rivers ar...
Article
Full-text available
The Arctic is directly impacted by climate change. The increase in air temperature drives the thawing of permafrost and an increase in coastal erosion and river discharge. This leads to a greater input of sediment and organic matter into coastal waters, which substantially impacts the ecosystems, the subsistence economy of the local population, and...
Article
Full-text available
Plain Language Summary The permanently frozen soils of the Arctic, known as permafrost, store large amounts of organic carbon, which accumulated over millennia due to slow decomposition in the cold Arctic regions. With climate warming this frozen organic carbon reservoir thaws and microbes recycle it quickly into greenhouse gases, which in turn sup...
Poster
Full-text available
1 Why Should we care about snow ? The lack of in-situ data in the Arctic and the problem about accessibility to these region constraints the traditional sampling over a year. While thermodynamic models such as CROCUS or SNOWPACK worked well in alpine area, they still need further calibrations for polar applications 1. 2 How to proceed? First snow c...
Article
Full-text available
Offshore permafrost plays a role in the global climate system, but observations of permafrost thickness, state, and composition are limited to specific regions. The current global permafrost map shows potential offshore permafrost distribution based on bathymetry and global sea level rise. As a first‐order estimate, we employ a heat transfer model...
Article
Full-text available
Permafrost landscapes are changing around the Arctic in response to climate warming, with coastal erosion being one of the most prominent and hazardous features. Using drone platforms, satellite images, and historic aerial photographs, we observed the rapid retreat of a permafrost coastline on Qikiqtaruk – Herschel Island, Yukon Territory, in the C...
Preprint
Thermokarst results from the thawing of ice-rich permafrost and alters the biogeochemical cycling in the Arctic by reworking soil material and redistributing soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) along uplands, hillslopes, and lowlands. Understanding the impact of this redistribution is key to better estimating the storage of SOC in per...
Article
Full-text available
Yukon’s Beaufort coast, Canada, is a highly dynamic landscape. Cultural sites, infrastructure, and travel routes used by the local population are particularly vulnerable to coastal erosion. To assess threats to these phenomena, rates of shoreline change for a 210 km length of the coast were analyzed and combined with socioeconomic and cultural info...
Article
Full-text available
A lasting legacy of the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007–2008 was the promotion of the Permafrost Young Researchers Network (PYRN), initially an IPY outreach and education activity by the International Permafrost Association (IPA). With the momentum of IPY, PYRN developed into a thriving network that still connects young permafrost scientists, e...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is an important control of carbon cycling, particularly in the Arctic. Permafrost degradation through deeper thaw and physical disturbances result in the release of carbon dioxide and methane to the atmosphere and to an increase in riverine dissolved organic matter (DOM) fluxes. Whereas riverine DOM fluxes of the large Arctic rivers...
Article
Full-text available
Permafrost warming has the potential to amplify global climate change, because when frozen sediments thaw it unlocks soil organic carbon. Yet to date, no globally consistent assessment of permafrost temperature change has been compiled. Here we use a global data set of permafrost temperature time series from the Global Terrestrial Network for Perma...
Article
Full-text available
Permafrost landscapes are changing around the Arctic in response to climate warming, with coastal erosion being one of the most prominent and hazardous features. Using drone platforms, satellite images and historic aerial photos, we observed the rapid retreat of a permafrost coastline on Qikiqtaruk–Herschel Island, Yukon Territory, in the Canadian...
Poster
Significant warming has occurred in the Arctic over the past four decades at a much faster rate then the rest of our planet. Negative anomalies of spatial and temporal trends snow and permafrost are now relatively well documented. Those trends lead to a series of strong climate-related feedbacks, which in turn contribute to the arctic amplification...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal ecosystems in the Arctic are affected by climate change. As summer rainfall frequency and intensity are projected to increase in the future, more organic matter, nutrients and sediment could be mobilized and transported into the coastal nearshore zones. However, knowledge of current processes and future changes is limited. We investigated s...
Article
Full-text available
The timing of snowmelt is an important turning point in the seasonal cycle of small Arctic catchments. The TerraSAR-X (TSX) satellite mission is a synthetic aperture radar system (SAR) with high potential to measure the high spatiotemporal variability of snow cover extent (SCE) and fractional snow cover (FSC) on the small catchment scale. We invest...
Article
Full-text available
Ice‐wedge polygons are widespread periglacial features and influence landscape hydrology and carbon storage. The influence of climate and topography on polygon development is not entirely clear, however, giving high uncertainties to projections of permafrost development. We studied the mid‐ to late Holocene development of modern ice‐wedge polygon s...
Article
Full-text available
Thermokarst lakes cover nearly one fourth of ice-rich permafrost lowlands in the Arctic. Sediments from an athalassic subsaline thermokarst lake on Herschel Island (69°36′N; 139°04′W, Canadian Arctic) were used to understand regional changes in climate and in sediment transport, hydrology, nutrient availability and permafrost disturbance. The sedim...
Article
To better understand the reaction of Arctic coasts to increasing environmental pressure, coastal changes along a 210-km length of the Yukon Territory coast in north-west Canada were investigated. Shoreline positions were acquired from aerial and satellite images between 1951 and 2011. Shoreline change rates were calculated for multiple time periods...
Article
Full-text available
Retrogressive thaw slumps (RTSs) are among the most active thermokarst landforms in the Arctic and deliver a large amount of material to the Arctic Ocean. However, their contribution to the organic carbon (OC) budget is unknown. We provide the first estimate of the contribution of RTSs to the nearshore OC budget of the Yukon Coast, Canada, and desc...
Chapter
Full-text available
Permafrost ecosystems occupy a quarter of the land surface in the Northern Hemisphere. Ongoing rapid temperature change in these areas causes permafrost warming in the Arctic and thawing in the Subarctic regions (Romanovsky et al. Permafr Periglac Process 21:106–116 2010).
Article
Full-text available
Reducing uncertainties about carbon cycling is important in the Arctic where rapid environmental changes contribute to enhanced mobilization of carbon. Here we quantify soil organic carbon (SOC) contents of permafrost soils along the Yukon Coastal Plain and determine the annual fluxes from coastal erosion. Different terrain units were assessed base...
Article
Arctic warming is leading to substantial changes to permafrost including rapid Degradation of ice and ice-rich coasts and riverbanks. In this study, we present and evaluate a high spatiotemporal resolution three-year time series of X-Band microwave satellite data from the TerraSAR-X (TSX) satellite to quantify cliff-top erosion (CTE) of an ice-rich...
Article
Full-text available
Arctic warming is leading to substantial changes to permafrost including rapid degradation of ice and ice-rich coasts and riverbanks. In this study, we present and evaluate a high spatiotemporal resolution three-year time series of X-Band microwave satellite data from the TerraSAR-X (TSX) satellite to quantify cliff-top erosion (CTE) of an ice-rich...
Article
Full-text available
We describe the evolution of coastal retrogressive thaw slumps (RTSs) between 1952 and 2011 along the Yukon Coast, Canada, and provide the first estimate of the contribution of RTSs to the nearshore organic carbon budget in this area. We 1) monitor the evolution of RTSs during the periods 1952–1972 and 1972–2011; 2) calculate the volume of material...
Article
Erosion of permafrost coasts has received increasing scientific attention since 1990s because of rapid land loss and the mobilisation potential of old organic carbon. The majority of permafrost coastal erosion studies are limited to time periods from a few years to decades. Most of these studies emphasize the spatial variability of coastal erosion,...
Article
Retrogressive thaw slumps (RTSs) are among the most active landforms in the Arctic; their number has increased significantly over the past decades. While processes initiating discrete RTSs are well identified, the major terrain controls on the development of coastal RTSs at a regional scale are not yet defined. Our research reveals the main geomorp...