Hugo Saiz

Hugo Saiz
King Juan Carlos University | URJC · Departamento de Biología y Geología, Física y Química Inorgánica

PhD

About

56
Publications
13,245
Reads
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827
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2014 - January 2016
Université de Rennes 1
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2008 - September 2014
Spanish National Research Council
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (56)
Preprint
Full-text available
Experimental evidence shows that grassland plant diversity enhances ecosystem functioning. Yet, the transfer of results from controlled biodiversity experiments to naturally assembled ‘real world’ ecosystems remains challenging. Here, we address this issue by experimentally sowing locally absent plant species in 73 agricultural grasslands along a l...
Preprint
Full-text available
Experimental evidence shows that grassland plant diversity enhances ecosystem functioning. Yet, the transfer of results from controlled biodiversity experiments to naturally assembled ‘real world’ ecosystems remains challenging. Here, we address this issue by experimentally sowing locally absent plant species in 73 agricultural grasslands along a l...
Article
Full-text available
An understanding of the diversity spatial organization in plant communities provides essential information for management and conservation planning. In this study we investigated, using a multi-species approach, how plant–plant interactions determine the local structure and composition of diversity in a set of Mediterranean plant communities, rangi...
Article
Invasions constitute a major driver of biodiversity changes. Insular plant communities are particularly vulnerable to invasions and are relevant models for investigating mechanisms supporting the establishment and spread of introduced plants. Terrestrial flora of sub-Antarctic islands must often thrive in highly windy habitats, thus imposing strong...
Article
Dryland soils provide different societal and environmental services, such as food supply and biodiversity support. In Europe, most of dryland areas are devoted to agriculture. In the next decades, both European and worldwide drylands are expected to suffer with intensity the foreseen climate change-derived rise in aridity. Many studies have focusse...
Article
Full-text available
Deciphering the effect of neutral and deterministic processes on community assembly is critical to understand and predict diversity patterns. The information held in community trait distributions is commonly assumed as a signature of these processes, but empirical and modelling attempts have most often failed to untangle their confounding, sometime...
Article
Full-text available
Using 642 forest plots from three regions in Germany, we analyzed the direct and indirect effects of forest management intensity and of environmental variables on lichen functional diversity (FDis). Environmental stand variables were affected by management intensity and acted as an environmental filter: summing direct and indirect effects resulted...
Article
The functional traits of organisms within multispecies assemblages regulate biodiversity effects on ecosystem functioning. Yet how traits should assemble to boost multiple ecosystem functions simultaneously (multifunctionality) remains poorly explored. In a multibiome litter experiment covering most of the global variation in leaf trait spectra, we...
Article
Full-text available
Land-use intensification can increase provisioning ecosystem services, such as food and timber production, but it also drives changes in ecosystem functioning and biodiversity loss, which may ultimately compromise human wellbeing. To understand how changes in land-use intensity affect the relationships between biodiversity, ecosystem functions, and...
Article
1. Several studies have evaluated lichen responses in terms of shifts in species climate suitability, species richness, and community composition. In contrast, patterns of co‐occurrence among species that could be related to complex species interactions have received less consideration. Biotic interactions play a major role in shaping species niche...
Article
Aridity, which is increasing worldwide because of climate change, affects the structure and functioning of dryland ecosystems. Whether aridification leads to gradual (versus abrupt) and systemic (versus specific) ecosystem changes is largely unknown. We investigated how 20 structural and functional ecosystem attributes respond to aridity in global...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Plant communities are usually characterised by species composition and abundance, but also underlie a multitude of complex interactions that we have only recently started unveiling. Yet, we are still far from understanding ecological and evolutionary processes shaping the network-level organisation of plant diversity, and to what extent...
Article
Full-text available
Drylands cover more than 40% of the terrestrial surface, and their global extent and socioecological importance will increase in the future due to the forecasted increases in aridity driven by climate change. Despite the essential role of metallic micronutrients in life chemistry and ecosystem functioning, it is virtually unknown how their bioavail...
Article
Aim: Species-area relationships (also known as 'species-area curves' and 'species accumulation curves') represent the relationship between species richness and the area sampled in a given community. These relationships can be used to describe diversity patterns while accounting for the well-known scale-dependence of species richness. Despite their...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Species–area relationships (also known as “species–area curves” and “species accumulation curves”) represent the relationship between species richness and the area sampled in a given community. These relationships can be used to describe diversity patterns while accounting for the well‐known scale‐dependence of species richness. Despite their v...
Article
Plants may depend on nurse plants to establish and survive on gypsum environments, which are stressful for plant life. Shrubs may act as nurse plants by ameliorating micro-environmental conditions in their local vicinity. Despite its importance, the role of nurse shrubs on the spatial patterning of plant establishment remains largely unknown in gyp...
Article
Full-text available
1.Trait intraspecific variability determines community dynamics and species coexistence. In response to competition, plants can display intraspecific variability to enhance their competitive ability or stabilize their niche differences with competitors. This response is multidimensional because it involves changes along different functional axes an...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic activities have modified vegetation on subalpine belts for a long time, lowering the treeline ecotone and influencing the landscape mainly through grazing and fire. The abandonment of these traditional land use practices during the last decades and global warming are contributing largely to the colonization of woody species in subalpi...
Article
1. Biotic interactions are key determinants of plant community structure. Indirect interactions such as intransitivity (i.e. in the absence of competitive hierarchies among species) have been hypothesized to benefit diversity within plant communities. However, their effect on functional diversity remains scarcely explored in real communities. Here...
Article
Full-text available
Many studies have reported the phytotoxicity of allelopathic compounds under controlled conditions. However, more field studies are required to provide realistic evidences for the significance of allelopathic interference in natural communities. We conducted a 2-years field experiment in a semiarid plant community (NE Spain). Specifically, we plant...
Data
Climatic profile of the study area. (A) Monthly rainfall (solid lines) in the study area during the period 2014–2016. The shaded area represents the average rainfall over 30 years (1970–2000). (B) Average monthly temperature (solid lines) in the study area during the period 2014–2016. The dashed line represents the average temperature over 30 years...
Data
Initial size (cm3, mean ± SE) of target species juveniles transplanted by microsite. ART, A. herba-alba; SAL, S. vermiculata; BS, bare soil. Significant differences among microsites (ANOVA, p < 0.05) are highlighted in bold. (PDF)
Data
Database. This appendix contains juvenile size and vitality data, seed germination and seedling survival data, and soil chemical data used. (XLSX)
Data
Annual growth (mean ± SE) of target species juveniles by year. Different letters indicate significant differences among years (Tukey's HSD test; p < 0.05). (TIF)
Data
Net interaction outcome of shrub microsites. Relative interaction index (RII) calculated for (A) the size (mean ± SE), (B) germination and (C) survival of the target species in A. herba-alba (square symbols) and S. vermiculata (triangle symbols) microsites. Bars in B) and C) indicate the 95% confidence interval obtained using the bootstraping (see...
Data
Vitality (mean % of green parts ± SE) of target species juveniles by season and shrub microsite. ART, A. herba-alba; SAL, S. vermiculata. (TIF)
Article
Despite commonly used to unveil the complex structure of interactions within ecological communities and their value to assess their resilience against external disturbances, network analyses have seldom been applied in plant communities. We evaluated how plant-plant spatial association networks vary in global drylands and assessed whether network s...
Article
Full-text available
Vegetation spatial patterns emerge in response to feedback interactions between organisms and their environment, because of the redistribution of water and nutrients around the plant canopy or as a consequence of facilitation/competition interactions at the plant level, even in the absence of pre-existing substratum heterogeneities. It has been sug...
Preprint
Full-text available
Aim Despite their widespread use and value to unveil the complex structure of the interactions within ecological communities and their value to assess the resilience of communities, network analyses have seldom been applied in plant communities. We aim to evaluate how plant-plant interaction networks vary in global drylands, and to assess whether n...
Article
Ecosystem management is a difficult task because it must conciliate the ecological, economic, and social dimensions of socioecological systems. In those systems, the action of any single component can have an effect on the others and result in a critical impact on the organization of the entire system. This study examined the collaboration networks...
Article
Full-text available
Plant establishment in semiarid ecosystems is affected by the limited spatial and temporal availability of resources and adequate microsites provided by nurse plants. There has been little research on plant establishment in these ecosystems that consider both the ecological roles of different plant types and the abiotic properties of their microsit...
Article
Full-text available
Plant establishment in semiarid ecosystems is affected by the limited spatial and tempora availability of resources and adequate microsites provided by nurse plants. There has been little researc on plant establishment in these ecosystems that consider both the ecological roles of different plan types and the abiotic properties of their microsites....
Article
Network science has helped to understand the organization principles of the interactions among the constituents of large complex systems. However, recently, the high resolution of the data sets collected has allowed to capture the different types of interactions coexisting within the same system. A particularly important example is that of systems...
Article
Full-text available
Despite recent advances in applying networks to study ecological systems, most of the network datasets are built attending only to a single type of interaction between nodes, which can be an oversimplification. In the present work, we built ecological networks that had positive and negative links for multiple plant communities based on the local sp...
Article
Full-text available
The Ordesa and Monte Perdido National Park and the Pyrenean Institute of Ecology (CSIC) recently joined the Spanish LTER network. As part of our strategy to understand recent changes in this protected area, we are carrying out a number of projects to evaluate changes at different spatiotemporal scales, using a variety of methods and approaches. We...
Article
Competitive interactions are a determinant driver of plant community structure in temperate grasslands. In such dense vegetation cover, competition mostly occurs over free space, which conditions niche availability. Clonal growth determines how plants exploit horizontal space, by (1) exploring and colonizing free patches (guerilla form) or (2) resi...
Article
Full-text available
Los espacios protegidos, por el hecho de albergar una gran geo-biodiversidad y asegurar una baja intervención humana, constituyen lugares muy adecuados para el seguimiento de organismos y procesos a escala ecológica, así como para la obtención de series temporales largas a escala geológica. En el marco de la red LTER-España, el Parque Nacional de O...
Data
Figure S2. Individual species–area relationship (ISAR) curves of Artemisia herba‐alba according to plant type at each study site.
Data
Figure S3. Individual species–area relationship (ISAR) curves of Salsola vermiculata according to plant type at each study site.
Data
Figure S1. Individual species–area relationship (ISAR) curves of Lygeum spartum according to plant type at each study site. Here and below: these curves can be interpreted as described in the legend of Fig. 3; Table 2 provides summaries of all curves.
Article
Full-text available
Plant–plant interactions are among the fundamental processes that shape structure and functioning of arid and semi-arid plant communities. Despite the large amount of studies that have assessed the relationship between plant–plant interactions (i.e., facilitation and competition) and diversity, often researchers forget a third kind of interaction,...
Presentation
How gypsophytes influence gypsum plant community structure. Gypsophytes act as diversity accummulators.
Poster
Biotic interactions between plants have a considerable role on community composition and structure in arid and semiarid areas. In gypsum habitats, where harsh conditions exist (high aridity and special substrate), some species might need the facilitation of other species to establish and survive. In this case, gypsovag species (not gypsum soil spec...
Article
Full-text available
Depopulation of rural areas is a widespread phenomenon that has occurred in most industrialized countries, and has contributed significantly to a reduction in the productivity of agro-ecological resources. In this study, we identified the main trends in the dynamics of rural populations in the Central Pyrenees in the 20th C and early 21st C, and us...
Poster
In gypsum habitats, under high abiotic stress conditions, gypsophytes could have an important role on diversity maintenance facilitating the establishment of less adapted species by creating microsites with less restrictive conditions, under the canopy (“nurse effect”). The net effect of nurse plants on seedling establishment could change with envi...
Article
Full-text available
In stressful environments many plant species are only able to survive if they benefit from the facilitative effect of "nurse" species. Typically, these nurses are species adapted to the stressful environmental conditions that favor the formation of vegetation patches, where other, less-adapted species can be established. However, ecological interac...
Data
En diciembre de 2012, se celebraron las primeras Jornadas IPErinas, reunión que permitió compartir al personal del Instituto Pirenaico de Ecología (CSIC), muchos de los trabajos de investigación que actualmente se están llevando a cabo por los distintos grupos del centro. Estas Jornadas surgieron de la necesidad de compartir y difundir los principa...
Article
Full-text available
Water redistribution from bare soil to vegetation patches is a key feature of semi-arid ecosystems, and is responsible for their patchy vegetation patterns. The magnitude of water redistribution depends on the properties of the bare soil (which determine the amount of water run-off) and the capacity of vegetation patches to trap water run-on. We ex...
Article
Full-text available
In semi-arid ecosystems, vegetation is heterogeneously distributed, with plant species often associating in patches. These associations between species are not constant, but depend on the particular response of each species to environmental factors. Here, we investigated how plant species associations change in response to livestock grazing in a se...
Data
Life form, abundance (ni), co-occurrences (ai) and association type (ass) of plant species in Cabo de Gata-Níjar Natural Park along grazing gradient. Association values are presented for species that could distinguish between neutral and negative associations. (XLSX)
Article
Full-text available
Network approaches can increase our understanding of both changes in ecosystems and the role that individual species play in such changes. In ecology, networks have been applied mainly to the study of food webs and mutualistic interactions, with few studies on plant communities. This study used a network approach to examine a semi-arid plant commun...

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